Brookesia superciliaris and therezieni

TCMontium

Member
Hello everyone,

I obtained a Brookesia specimen recently. It was sold as a "female Brookesia therezieni", but I am not sure about both of these being true. As far as I can see, the chameleon has no pointed lateroventral tubercles (aka. the spikes on the sides of the back continuing on the tail), which is said to be present at B. therezieni. If this description is true, :

"Pointed tubercles on lateroventral surface of tail B. therezieni
No pointed tubercles on lateroventral surface of tail B. superciliaris"

then my chameleon is a Brookesia superciliaris specimen. And a significant amound of the chameleons sold and bred for years as Brookesia superciliaris are actually Brookesia therezieni. I see many specimens of "Brookesia superciliaris" with visibly pointed lateroventral tubercles on google images and facebook, even some photos from experienced breeders.

Also, do you thing this is a female or male? I have never kept Brookesia specimens so I am not sure.



Thank you for your help,
 

Chris Anderson

Dr. House of Chameleons
Staff member
Would you mind posting some full body shots as well? Its hard to tell from the image, but there does appear to be a single lateroventral tubercle on the first picture just dorsal to the vent. Another difference is that B. therezieni tend to be more rough than B. superciliaris. Ultimately, these two species are very difficult to tell apart, and are freuquently misidentified.

Chris
 

TCMontium

Member
I can shoot full body too but since it is nearly impossible to see the tubercles from farther away I thought it wouldn't be more helpful than tail shots. I will try to post full body lateral and dorsal shots and better tail detail shots. It is now pretty much clear to me that she(?) does not have any big tubercles on her tail, but maybe they can be so small on B. therezieni females that they are unnoticable to an unfamiliar eye? I don't know. If female tubercles on tail are nearly as big as the males, than this is definately not a Brookesia therezieni.
 

TCMontium

Member
that's a good thing, thanks. Anyway i'm not going to mate her with a male, i'm just talking about the laying of infertile eggs. how do i know when it's time to move her in the bigger external lay bin if she refuses the little one?
Would you mind posting some full body shots as well? Its hard to tell from the image, but there does appear to be a single lateroventral tubercle on the first picture just dorsal to the vent. Another difference is that B. therezieni tend to be more rough than B. superciliaris. Ultimately, these two species are very difficult to tell apart, and are freuquently misidentified.

Chris
There are soil and leaf matter on the tail, those are not tubercles.
Photos are not too good. I read people say pygmies can die of stress just because you change their cage or handle them. Even thought I don't really believe them, I don't want to risk it since I do not know anything, just belief. :unsure: Otherwise I could take her out to sunlight and take perfect pictures.

 

Chris Anderson

Dr. House of Chameleons
Staff member
The lateroventral tubercles near the vent at the base of the tail are not going to be as large as those along the back in B. therezieni, but you should see some indication of them. This species can be quite difficult to distinguish from B. superciliaris. Based on these photos, I would agree that this animal appears to be B. superciliaris.

Chris
 
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