Bioactive vivarium for veiled chameleon

Discussion in 'Enclosures And Supplies' started by Zevil, Nov 11, 2018.

  1. Zevil

    Zevil New Member

    So I'm getting a veiled. May I have suggestions on what kind of plants can I put inside the vivarium? I'm thinking pothos, bromeliad and fittonia. Thanks.
     
  2. bobbydigital

    bobbydigital Avid Member

    @jamest0o0 has some great info on bioactive enclosures
     
  3. Zevil

    Zevil New Member

    Thank you. My friend has a pot of devil's ivy. Can I use that?
     
  4. ERKleRose

    ERKleRose Chameleon Enthusiast

    Just a warning, veileds are notorious for eating substrate, not making them the best candidates for bioactive. So just be careful and if he/she eats it, go to a bare bottom enclosure. Here’s a cham-safe plant list: https://flchams.com/chameleon-safe-plant-list/ Have you read the veiled care sheet here? https://www.chameleonforums.com/care/caresheets/veiled/ Could you fill out this form, as well, to make sure your husbandry is 100%, please? https://www.chameleonforums.com/how-ask-help-66/ If you need any help, I use bioactive for my panthers, too.
     
  5. ERKleRose

    ERKleRose Chameleon Enthusiast

    Yes you can, another name for it is pothos, which is cham-safe
     
  6. ERKleRose

    ERKleRose Chameleon Enthusiast

    Just make sure to either Physan, bleach dip, or just rinse off really well (you’d do that after using one of the other two options as well) any plants you use
     
  7. ERKleRose

    ERKleRose Chameleon Enthusiast

    Those are all great plants that are cham-safe and look good in a bioactive enclosure, as well!
     
  8. Zevil

    Zevil New Member

    Thanks for all your replies! Yes I'm aware that animals in bioactive enclosures can get impaction from eating the substrate. First of all, there is no way I will do free range feeding. And second, the leaf litter will also reduce the chance of my future cham from eating the substrate. Also I believe a healthy cham will not resort to eating the substrate.
     
    ERKleRose likes this.
  9. Goose502

    Goose502 Avid Member

    There is absolutely no better way to house any reptile. There are no good reasons for ANY species to not use a bioactive enclosure. Unless your chameleon is in quarantine, bioactive substrate is the best way to house them.
     
  10. Zevil

    Zevil New Member

    I have another question. Currently I made an inch of clay balls for drainage and people are telling me to increase to 3 inches. Is there really a need? I live in a warm and humid area btw with an average of 28-30℃ and 70-85% humidity daily.
     
  11. ERKleRose

    ERKleRose Chameleon Enthusiast

    Make it 3 inches
     
  12. Goose502

    Goose502 Avid Member

    I would use at least 1.5 inches. It’s hard to tell what will work best for you as everyone uses different amounts of water for misting/maintaining humidity. As long as you have a way of removing excess water, the drainage layer can be modified to suit your need. Unfortunately, using bioactive substrate requires a little trial and error. My thought has always been that more soil means more plants and roots. The more plants you have, the more water they will absorb. So if you mist very heavily, you may need to drain your substrate much more often when you first plant, as opposed to a year down the road when the plant life has properly filled in.
     
    ERKleRose likes this.
  13. Zevil

    Zevil New Member

    Well maintaining humidity is not a problem, I live in a humid area so the enclosure won't be heavily misted. I also intend to have 9 inches of substrate in a 2x2 feet area and lots of plants.
     
  14. Goose502

    Goose502 Avid Member

    Misting, and misting heavily is recommended to allow the chameleon to properly clean their eyes. I personally get around this by using an outdoor enclosure during part of the year. I can leave the hose running forever and it wouldn’t hurt anything. In an indoor enclosure, periodic misting sessions of 5-10 minutes (a couple times a week or so), can, and most likely will stretch a drainage layer to its limits. This will be very problematic early, when your plants are still young. I don’t ever have an issue with humidity either, but we aren’t misting to solely maintain humidity.
     
    ERKleRose likes this.
  15. Zevil

    Zevil New Member

    Update. Still not 100% completed. Waiting to get my exo terra jungle vines, a few air plants and sticking Java moss on my background.
     

    Attached Files:

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  16. Zevil

    Zevil New Member

    I have a question. I have an exo terra feeder dish, with regular misting, the water will get into the dish and possibly soak the calcium dust and drown the feeder insects. Any solution to this?
     
  17. ERKleRose

    ERKleRose Chameleon Enthusiast

    Make a feeding cup/jug/pipe with drainage in the bottom. Put the bowl in the least misted part of the cage. Full Throttle Feeders sells a PVC pipe feeder with drainage that works well. I made my own version that works just as well, too.
     
  18. Zevil

    Zevil New Member

    The Hibiscus flower has already wilted. I'm thinking of swapping it out for blue forget-me-not (Myosotis sylvatica).
     
  19. Jordanworks479

    Jordanworks479 Established Member

    Looks great I love begonia Rex my favorite terrarium plant.
    What’s the dimensions on that?
    I think you have a perineal hibiscus they wilt during the winter try a red darling they bloom huge flowers year round (pic below).
    You can replace it with orchards they do well in terrariums imo.
     

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    Zevil likes this.

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