antibiotics HELP

ataraxia

Avid Member
im in need of a good antibiotic that will deal with possible mouth rot. it looked a little red at the site (like a feeder possibly bit him) when i first noticed and now it has turned brown. i also dont know if it is my imagination but the brown spot looks to have gotten a tad bigger. maybe mouth rot? im not sure if it is healing? at any rate i dont want to play any games. what would be a good safe broad spectrum antibiotic and dose per gram. no culture tests or sensitivity test have been done. we simply dont have any qualified vets in my town.

thanks in advance.
 

kinyonga

Chameleon Enthusiast
Any vet should be able to clean the area out and get a sample to do a culture and sensitvity test done. Without knowing the bacteria involved it will just be a shot in the dark as to whether an antibiotic will work.
 

jojackson

New Member
Last time I said as much I was advised that cultures are expensive over there, hence the broadspectrum treatment recommeded above, though I agree with you Kin. :)
 
It is my personal opinion that you should not be trying to aquire antibiotics and dosing and treating the animal on your own. As kinyonga said, any vet can clean the area and do a C&S test. You really need to have that done so you know the correct medication to give, otherwise it's hit or miss. Cultures are not cheap, but are necessary.
 

jojackson

New Member
think he will need to see a vet for any injectable drugs anyway, though Im not sure how that stuff works in America. There are a number of broadspectrum type injectable antibiotics that may work though a sensitivity and culture is the logical idea to determin what will tackle that particuar infection best, since the OP says 'I dont want to play games'. Get out your wallet buddy! :)
 

kinyonga

Chameleon Enthusiast
The most commonly involved bacteria in mouth rot in chameleons is pseudomonas aeruginosa....its a stubborn one to get rid of. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen, so it exploits some break in the host defenses to initiate an infection.
 

jojackson

New Member
P. aeruginosa is frequently isolated from nonsterile sites (mouth swabs, sputum, etc.), and, under these circumstances, it often represents colonization and not infection. The isolation of P. aeruginosa from nonsterile specimens should, therefore, be interpreted cautiously, and the advice of a microbiologist or infectious diseases physician/pharmacist should be sought prior to starting treatment. Often no treatment is needed.
When P. aeruginosa is isolated from a sterile site (blood, bone, deep collections), it should be taken seriously, and almost always requires treatment.[citation needed]
P. aeruginosa is naturally resistant to a large range of antibiotics and may demonstrate additional resistance after unsuccessful treatment, in particular, through modification of a porin. It should usually be possible to guide treatment according to laboratory sensitivities, rather than choosing an antibiotic empirically. If antibiotics are started empirically, then every effort should be made to obtain cultures, and the choice of antibiotic used should be reviewed when the culture results are available.
Phage therapy against ear infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa was reported in the journal Clinical Otolaryngology in August 2009[30]

Antibiotics that have activity against P. aeruginosa include:
aminoglycosides (gentamicin, amikacin, tobramycin)
quinolones (ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, and moxifloxacin)
cephalosporins (ceftazidime, cefepime, cefoperazone, cefpirome, but not cefuroxime, ceftriaxone, cefotaxime)
antipseudomonal penicillins: ureidopenicillins and carboxypenicillins (piperacillin, ticarcillin: P. aeruginosa is intrinsically resistant to all other penicillins)
carbapenems (meropenem, imipenem, doripenem, but not ertapenem)
polymyxins (polymyxin B and colistin)[31]
monobactams (aztreonam)
 
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