Anionic Polyacrylamide

Picasso123

New Member
This is the stuff used to form all the feeding gels for prey items. I can't see this highly digestible by any organism other then maybe microbes? Reminds me of Olestra as a way to make chips fat free. Is there some other way to water crickets?
 

Echoezra

Established Member
I have heard people say put a damp sponge, but then what, they're eating a sponge, lol, is that better? Most people are gutloading them with fresh vegetables anyway, so they will get moisture from that. Before gutloading day, like if you have a tank ful and are only gutloading a few at a time, for the rest, put chunks of potato in there, that's how they're shipped to our store.
 

mardithepanther

New Member
if you wont the stink put a moist paper towel or wet piece of cotton or sponge. they dont eat it just suck. i use both dry and wet gutloads. collard greens mustard greens kale, lettuce. etc i dont buy anything commercial.
 

CNorton

Avid Member
Water crystals are cheap and easy to come by. At Home Depot, Lowe's, Orchard, or most nurseries you can buy a product named Soil Moist that you just add water and the crickets eat it up. I bought one $12 bag about 2 years ago and I'm still not even halfway through it.
 

jojackson

New Member
Is there some other way to water crickets?

yes, raw carrot. never used anything else. (for moisture) :)
 

Picasso123

New Member
Water crystals are cheap and easy to come by. At Home Depot, Lowe's, Orchard, or most nurseries you can buy a product named Soil Moist that you just add water and the crickets eat it up. I bought one $12 bag about 2 years ago and I'm still not even halfway through it.
You can buy some water crystals. This is what I use. You basically mix it with water.
Third item down.
http://www.tikitikireptiles.com/products.php?id=16
Those are all forms of Anionic Polyacrylamide.

Why don't people just use plain gelatin if they want the water to stay put? I would much rather feed carrots, celery or cucumber to crickets. They're all 90% water anyways.

Makes me wonder of over exceptance of this product may lead to a shortened life span or illness later on??
 

CNorton

Avid Member
Those are all forms of Anionic Polyacrylamide.

Why don't people just use plain gelatin if they want the water to stay put? I would much rather feed carrots, celery or cucumber to crickets. They're all 90% water anyways.

Makes me wonder of over exceptance of this product may lead to a shortened life span or illness later on??
Never had any problems and yes there are some of us that have been using "water crystals" long-term. Not sure what else to suggest, if you've already got a preferred method then use it.
 

dlegare

Established Member
I've been using various forms of polymer gels for almost 20 years with no obvious problems. Only way I know it can hurt a reptile is if it eats some of the gel that isn't fully hydrated or worse gets ahold of a piece of dry product. Then it can cause impactions and ruptures of G.I. tract and or suffocation.
 

Hyokenseisou

New Member
I just use a fairly damp piece of folded up paper towel in my cricket bin (I used to use tissue paper, but paper towel holds more). I just check on it ever couple of days and moisten if needed, and it starts looking really gross (cause of poo or whatever), then I throw it out and put a new one in; works great! And I know it works because I hardly ever see any dead crickets in my bin and whenever I wet the towel again, 2 mins later I see the whole thing covered with them buggies.
And they don't eat the paper towel either.v And even if they did, I just end up throwing it away in a couple days.

Occasionally if I have extra, I throw in some chunks of carrot; they seem to really like carrots (as opposed to all the other types of fruits/veggies I've offered).
 
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