Upper respitory inffection / Baytril Doseage.

Evolution IX SE

New Member
Hello,
When a chameleon is being treated for an upper respratory inffection, do you administor Baytril through an injection? What is the reccomended doseage in Ml/Mg that you administor daily?
 

jleahl

New Member
Is your vet administering the Baytril? Are you just double-checking him, or are you medicating your cham yourself? I think maybe only Matt Wheelock would know the answer.
 

kinyonga

Chameleon Enthusiast
I would recommend that you speak to a vet about this.

First of all he/she can tell you the right dose...it calculated on the weight of your chameleon. Secondly, you need to know for sure that your chameleon has indeed got a respiratory infection and it would be helpful to know if baytril will work against the bacteria involved.

Medications are usually hard on the chameleon...so I'd want to be sure that they are really needed.
 

boothy

New Member
my female veild chameleon had URI 2 months ago and i took her to the vet and she gave me 4 needles of antibiotic 2cc in each needle and i ended up only giving her 3 cause one the stuff froze at the end so it would come out but shes been fine ever since and back to normal but i also got it right from the start so thats prolly why it didnt last to long but im still keeping an eye on her cause it can come back, but i didint use any baytril
 

Heika

New Member
Baytril is prescribed to the animal based on weight. It really, really depends on your animal's size as to how much baytril it should receive, and what potency the baytril is at. When my vet prescribes for a leaf chameleon, the baytril is diluted with something. And, I believe there are different potency levels for baytril anyhow. Best thing to do, as pretty much everyone else said, is to see the vet. Yes, it can be injected under the skin though.. that is how I administer it. It can also be given orally.

Heika
 

Evolution IX SE

New Member
it would be helpful to know if baytril will work against the bacteria involved.

I'm pretty sure a URI can be virial, fungal, parasitic, or "bacterial". And thanks for your comments but I really didn't have to join a forum to read "TAKE THE CHAMELEON TO THE VET" that pretty much seems to be the most common response from most members.:p I also never said I had a chameleon or one with a URI, and I'm positive I never mentioned dosing a reptile with an unknown ammount of Baytril. ;)

I simply asked if a chameleon has to be injected and what was the ammount. One person anserwed my question with there syringe response, that was all I was looking for. Sorry if I gave anyone the impression that I was injecting chameleons with an unkown ammount of baytril.:rolleyes:
 
I'm positive I never mentioned dosing a reptile with an unknown ammount of Baytril.
Take a look at what you said though (below), I think this part of your post definitely would warrant concern from forum members that do not know you (new poster) or your background. You might be surprised how many post like this occur from people who have JUST joined the forum, to ask a question to save them the vet visit so they can do it themselves, uneducated, and risk the life. Don't take offense to it and don't return with sarcasm.

what is the reccomended doseage in Ml/Mg that you administor daily?

For readers:

Respiratory infections are common; the incidence can be influenced by respiratory or systemic parasitism, unfavorable environmental temperatures, unsanitary conditions, concurrent disease, malnutrition, and hypovitaminosis A. Open-mouth breathing, nasal discharge, and dyspnea are frequent signs. Aeromonas and Pseudomonas spp are frequently isolated, but many respiratory infections are mixed. Septicemia may develop in severe or prolonged cases. Treatment consists of improving husbandry and initiating systemic antibiotics. Nebulization therapy with antibiotics diluted in saline, in combination with acetylcysteine, has been used together with parenteral antibiotics to treat bacterial pneumonia. Reptiles with respiratory infections should be maintained at the mid to upper end of their preferred optimal temperatures. Increased temperatures are important not only to stimulate the immune system but also to help mobilize respiratory secretions.

An Exerpt from: The Merck Veterinary Manual
 

kinyonga

Chameleon Enthusiast
Evolution IX SE said..."I'm pretty sure a URI can be virial, fungal, parasitic, or "bacterial"...URI's can be caused by more than bacteria.

You said..."And thanks for your comments but I really didn't have to join a forum to read "TAKE THE CHAMELEON TO THE VET" that pretty much seems to be the most common response from most members"...I did not say to take it to a vet...I said..."I would recommend that you speak to a vet about this". By speaking to a vet you would be able to find out the dosage and the means of administering it.

You said..."Sorry if I gave anyone the impression that I was injecting chameleons with an unkown ammount of baytril"...sorry I jumped to the conclusion that you were going to treat the chameleon yourself...but most people who ask questions about dosage and means of administering the medication ask it with that intention.
 
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