Some furcifer campani pictures

javadi

Established Member
Just thought I’d share some pictures from my f. Campani (jeweled chameleon) group. I just love them!
 

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javadi

Established Member
Looking at F. campani's weather forecast on madcham (https://www.madcham.de/en/furcifer-campani/), they see very cold temperatures. Do these guys brumate in the cold season when the max temp is around 66F?
Excellent point and question. I've not studied them myself in the field, but I've spoken with the ever helpful madcham.de about this quite a bit. Paraphrasing from our discussions, it appears they do not brumate in winter in the wild, and some do survive the winter but many die off during this time. There are just far fewer of them around than in the warmer season. I can say that in captivity, they do well with very cool temperatures and do not truly "brumate" or "hibernate" like B. decaryi for instance. They appear to be active all year around in captivity without obvious differences in behavior. I still have a lot to learn about them though.
 

Mendez

Chameleon Enthusiast
That's super interesting! I never thought they would die off in the wild, but I guess it does make sense since they face such unforgiving weather. It's truly remarkable how a species that dies almost seasonally can pass on its genes for millions of years. Almost in a similar fashion to labordi. How long do these little guys live in captivity? I'm guessing around 2-3 years in captivity?
 

Mendez

Chameleon Enthusiast
Also, how did you contact madcham? I have a question about different species, F. willsii, on whether or not they brumate. They face similar weather patterns as parsonii, and with no cb success, I'm left to guess that maybe brumation is key to cb propagation.
 

javadi

Established Member
Hard to answer since captive bred individuals are (and have historically been) almost nonexistent, so most of what we know about them is from people's experience with wild caught imports which are of course subject to the typical import problems, leading to early death. Most die within weeks to months of arriving from Madagascar. In addition, care parameters for them tailored to improve their longevity have yet to be determined and disseminated. From the bit of success the community has had with them though (Kevin Stanford, Jurgen), 2-3 years is a reasonable guess. I have older wc imports at >1.5 years. I suspect with captive breeding efforts improving and a better understanding of their care though, they can probably live substantially longer.

I contacted madcham through their email on their website. I think they have a facebook page as well you can probably contact them on. Interesting about the willsii. Another species I'd love to work with. If you do find something interesting out about them, please let us know!
 

Mendez

Chameleon Enthusiast
I just contacted madcham through facebook page regarding F. willsii; I'll let you know what they say. Hopefully, we can get more info on them.

That sounds very promising with respect to F. campani's lengthening lifespan. Perhaps I'll have to try my hand with F. campani someday in the future! Super thankful to keepers like you who are figuring out the husbandry for these rarely kept species!
 
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