Sleeping alot, left eye shut, help!

#21
A little off topic here, but I had to point out... this is not true. Venus fly traps are not toxic and wouldn't compete for food in any threatening way. That said, the venus fly trap would likely not survive long in these conditions. They are bog plants that require very strong light and must remain wet at all times, while sitting in a tray of distilled/ro water(like they would be in a bog). They also need a chilly winter dormancy where they die back and don't grow for a few months. The cham would also kill them by closing their traps(which is bad for them if they're not feeding).
I would hate to see a Venus fly trap catch a feeder and my chameleon go for it.. If consumed by a chameleon you are 100% sure it's not toxic? You can guarantee the chameleon won't be harmed once so ever? I don't see why you would want to take that risk?
 

VerucaSalt

Established Member
#22
What I got done so far:
  • Bought calcium without d3
  • Added more foliage and more coming
  • Increased automatic mister spray time (2 min)
  • Changed dubia Roach diet (apples, carrots, ground flax seed, ground sunflower seeds, ground almonds, ground sesame seeds).
Anything else to add please? Thanks for all the advice. I don't really know if he's that much better but I'll wait!
Mix up the diet, they can't just eat roaches, in fact, switch to crickets as a staple-no uric acid stored, with superworms, theres an excellent thread in here I'll link if I can find it that lists their dietary pref for health. You will make progress, it just takes a while, but you're doing all you can!
 

jamest0o0

Chameleon Enthusiast
#23
I would hate to see a Venus fly trap catch a feeder and my chameleon go for it.. If consumed by a chameleon you are 100% sure it's not toxic? You can guarantee the chameleon won't be harmed once so ever? I don't see why you would want to take that risk?
All that would happen is the chameleon would destroy the fly trap. Yes I can guarantee the chameleon would be fine, there's no more risk than having any other plant in there. My only issue with it would be that the fly trap would never survive. They are very delicate. Have you kept them? Carnivorous plants are safe, they just wouldn't do well in 99% of cham enclosures. And I wouldn't want sticky species in their like pinguicula or drosera.

People are always so worried about toxicity in plants, but most all of the plants in the rainforest are toxic in some level. Most plants in general are. Pothos are filled with oxalates and toxic to cats/dogs. I can bet you wouldn't be filling that good after eating a few pothos leaves.
 

jamest0o0

Chameleon Enthusiast
#24
Mix up the diet, they can't just eat roaches, in fact, switch to crickets as a staple-no uric acid stored, with superworms, theres an excellent thread in here I'll link if I can find it that lists their dietary pref for health. You will make progress, it just takes a while, but you're doing all you can!
I agree with most of this, but roaches make a perfect staple. I just wouldn't feed off ones that have eaten animal proteins like cat food. I don't feed crickets at all, they carry so many diseases and parasites I'd rather not risk it. I'm still able to offer 10+ different feeders on a regular basis though.
 
#25
Thanks everyone! I think I might try to get some superworms. Do I gut load them like my roaches? Also, since superworms are kinda large, will they be to big for my cham?
 
#28
All that would happen is the chameleon would destroy the fly trap. Yes I can guarantee the chameleon would be fine, there's no more risk than having any other plant in there. My only issue with it would be that the fly trap would never survive. They are very delicate. Have you kept them? Carnivorous plants are safe, they just wouldn't do well in 99% of cham enclosures. And I wouldn't want sticky species in their like pinguicula or drosera.

People are always so worried about toxicity in plants, but most all of the plants in the rainforest are toxic in some level. Most plants in general are. Pothos are filled with oxalates and toxic to cats/dogs. I can bet you wouldn't be filling that good after eating a few pothos leaves.
Well alrighty then :)
 
#30
Here's pictures of him in this morning. This is when he scares me. He is really lethargic (even under the basking bulb) and won't eat because all he wants is to close his eyes so he doesn't keep them open long enough. When I was just holding him, he just walked blindly on my hand (both eyes closed). He also rubbed his right eye against the cage as if something was on it. Seems like both eyes are effected. This all happened this morning, last morning was also kinda the same. If I feed him, I will have to be at 3 o'clock until he gets better and eats in the morning. I think he also might look a little dehydrated?
 

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#33
I am happy to say that he has both his eyes open at moment. One looks a little different? Here are both of his eyes.

About the legs, one of the front ones has a small bump? This got me very worried. I just don't know why he would get mbd. What am I doing wrong? I know it occurs if there is no UVB but I have that... What to do?
 

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#35
Hello all! I am happy to say Jack seems to be acting much better lately! I am so happy! About his MBD, I think he had it from his previous owner, and now it has stopped progressing when I aquired him! Thanks to all!
 
#37
It's easy to blame the problem on someone else but you were giving him d3 every feeding that may have pushed him into having mbd.. you need to see a vet no way around that.
Here is some good info on mbd..
http://www.martinsreptiles.co.uk/ukchams/calciummbdd3.htm
Do some research please and get that poor guy to a vet. Just because he may be doing better doesn't mean that he is going to be able to heal from this on his own.
 

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