Platycerium Grande Staghorn

Brodybreaux25

Chameleon Enthusiast
Anyone ever researched these? Toxic? Light required? Watering?

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Kaizen

Chameleon Enthusiast
So, it looks like an epiphyte, so my guess is sufficient humidity will suffice for h20. With plants, I typically look at how it naturally grows. Epiphytes are usually understory plants, and that combined with the large leaf surface makes me think low light is probably sufficient. For toxicity, I have no idea. If you’re going to try to fuse it to something like a corkbark panel, or similar, I’d get it cool (like 50), do whatever root twork you need to do—I believe you’re well versed on carving wood—and then keep it tented and spray it with super thrive for a couple weeks.
 

snitz427

Chameleon Enthusiast
I have a huge staghorn named Fred. I tried a baby one in the cham cage but it didnt do well.

They get large and heavy. Must be mounted epiphytically and need a lot of light indoors. Daily misting or fogging but a good weekly soak. The dried up brown stuff is actually a frond so dont mess with it.
 

Hashtag ChamLife

Avid Member
I have several regular ol' staghorns and now I want one of these... super cool. That being said, I've tried mounted, hanging basket, and potted versions of staghorn in my cages. The mounted ones got heavy and couldn't really prune them. The potted style didn't get enough light and didn't do well with so much moisture. The hanging basket style was best as I could easily move it as it grew (that one is now thriving and on its 3 basket upgrade). The one I had mounted eventually fell off and I stuck it under my hibiscus outside and it's doing pretty great.

But I'd say knowing the size of your builds, and you knowledge and workmanship, if you were to mount the staghorn to a cork bark (for example) and then mount that so you could eventually relocate it... you'd do well.

All that being said, what's your application here? I'd assume this "grande" version is just that - super huge. Are you going to try and build a massive enclosure or use it in a free range? Believe it or not, in ideal settings, the normal staghorns grow quite quickly.

[I also totally agree with the banana peel!]
 

Hashtag ChamLife

Avid Member
Here are the 3 above mentioned staghorns:

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Left was the mounted one, right is basket, the tiny one behind the leaves of the hibiscus was the potted one. They all started off the same size...

Edit: cost wise, they started out as $6/ea slightly smaller than the center one. If you want one like the other two, expected to pay about $40ish. Could be more or less depending on how frequently you can get them there. I can actually find hanging basket style ones at Lowe's for $20 about half the size of mine. The nursery sells "cuttings" for $30 off their well aged ones but they can be hit or miss depending on who hacks it for you.

Also of note, they satellite like a bromeliad. Eventually it becomes multiple little "saucers" which produce their own "fern" growths.
 
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snitz427

Chameleon Enthusiast
There are a bunch or different types of staghorn - are you looking at one in particular or staghorns in general? They’e pretty cool - Im hoping to move Fred out into the greenhouse next year.
 

Hashtag ChamLife

Avid Member
Here are the 3 above mentioned staghorns:

View attachment 254133

Left was the mounted one, right is basket, the tiny one behind the leaves of the hibiscus was the potted one. They all started off the same size...

Edit: cost wise, they started out as $6/ea slightly smaller than the center one. If you want one like the other two, expected to pay about $40ish. Could be more or less depending on how frequently you can get them there. I can actually find hanging basket style ones at Lowe's for $20 about half the size of mine. The nursery sells "cuttings" for $30 off their well aged ones but they can be hit or miss depending on who hacks it for you.

Also of note, they satellite like a bromeliad. Eventually it becomes multiple little "saucers" which produce their own "fern" growths.
And for informational purposes... here's the aforementioned satellite growth...

20191221_212348.jpg

These two are fully developed and "maturing".

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I actually just noticed this when I dismounted it from the tree... looks like a new baby dropping up, yay!
 

Hashtag ChamLife

Avid Member
So they have to soak to hydrate?
I live in Florida and have never soaked mine. I water them pretty often though.

I pretty much treat them like air plants - I like to soak my epiphytes once a week or so (and once a month with a little Epsom salt), or mist them every day or two.
I too have a bunch of air plants. I soak those if the live in my plant area. My Xenographica are my favorites, though I had some awesome medusa's from south America.

Have you had success with them in your cham cages? Mine tend to rot at the base and die. I've only had 3/10 or so do well and bloom. [The spikey kind with purple flowers and the succulent looking one with orange buds]
 

GoodKarma19

Chameleon Enthusiast
I live in Florida and have never soaked mine. I water them pretty often though.


I too have a bunch of air plants. I soak those if the live in my plant area. My Xenographica are my favorites, though I had some awesome medusa's from south America.

Have you had success with them in your cham cages? Mine tend to rot at the base and die. I've only had 3/10 or so do well and bloom. [The spikey kind with purple flowers and the succulent looking one with orange buds]

I've had mixed success in my cages. My ExoTerra has about 10 or so, and most of them are doing really well! I've forgotten most of their names, though. The only one that isn't quite as happy is my ionantha. 1 other one was trying to rot out on me, but I moved it to a better draining location and she's getting back on her feet!

Seems like the ones with broader, smoother leaves are better suited. My "fuzzy" ones are prone to rot.

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snitz427

Chameleon Enthusiast
Oooo, he's a stud! :love:

You have him on a piece of bark?

Also, is he just a single growth and how old is he?


My friend in orlando cut it off her father’s 75 year old plant. Not sure how old this particular one is. He’s tied to a piece of cork for now... one day i want to transfer him to a really large piece where babies can grow around it.


I dont soak him only because he’s too large. I just give him a good, slow shower and get all over and under the plant really wet.
 

Hashtag ChamLife

Avid Member
My friend in orlando cut it off her father’s 75 year old plant. Not sure how old this particular one is. He’s tied to a piece of cork for now... one day i want to transfer him to a really large piece where babies can grow around it.


I dont soak him only because he’s too large. I just give him a good, slow shower and get all over and under the plant really wet.
Awesome! That's how the one I tried to mount in my cage started out. It was a cutting of my sister-in-laws that she got when she bought her house. She had no idea what it was... lucky. (Its super huge and really old).

That's the same basic treatment I give mine... a good long spray down, much like the chams. I use a pump sprayer and make sure to get over, under, between, leaves, etc. Seems to be the winning plan!

Nice job with Fred, he's got some nice long ferns!
 

snitz427

Chameleon Enthusiast
Awesome! That's how the one I tried to mount in my cage started out. It was a cutting of my sister-in-laws that she got when she bought her house. She had no idea what it was... lucky. (Its super huge and really old).

That's the same basic treatment I give mine... a good long spray down, much like the chams. I use a pump sprayer and make sure to get over, under, between, leaves, etc. Seems to be the winning plan!

Nice job with Fred, he's got some nice long ferns!

Well hes only been in my care for a month or so, so too soon to tell how Im doing. :p I’ll be crushed if he doesnt do well!
 
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