panther cham. one eye wont open

TC1144

New Member
hes about 2 years old one eye wont open the last week or two not very active took him out of his cage today and he just sat on my shoulder in the sun and usually hes is aggressive he eats and drinks just fine any ideas there is no crust shed or anything out of the norm just one eye closed and seems to be uncoordinated.
 

Chameleon Company

Avid Member
hes about 2 years old one eye wont open the last week or two not very active took him out of his cage today and he just sat on my shoulder in the sun and usually hes is aggressive he eats and drinks just fine any ideas there is no crust shed or anything out of the norm just one eye closed and seems to be uncoordinated.
Give direct supplementation of Vitamin A some thought.

(Part 1)

Possible Vitamin A Deficiency in Panther Chameleons, Symptoms and Solutions
By The Chameleon Company, LLC

Vitamin A deficiency is a common malady in LTC (Long-Term-Captive) Panther chameleons, either with WC (Wild Caught) or CB (Captive Born) origins. This stems from the chameleon's inability to synthesize real Vitamin A from common precursors, such as beta-carotene. This can be confusing when evaluating supplements, as many dry supplements list Vitamin A content, but only as the precursor, beta-carotene, and not as “pre-formed”, or in essence, real Vitamin A.

While lack of Vitamin A effects many aspects of chameleon health, the usual first observed symptom is the appearance of an unexplained eye irritation, manifested in difficulties in keeping first one eye open, and after a few days, both eyes are affected. In most cases, the eyes will not appear sunken, or in any other way mis-shaped initially, although secondary problems, such as an infection, can follow. The usual initial observation is that it is causing irritation to the chameleon, and that it can't keep the eye open as normal. It occurs more often in larger animals, but sometimes occurs in larger juveniles. In select cases the eye may appear as swollen. Successfully hatched chameleons seem to be born with a supply of Vitamin A, an essential ingredient for successful embryonic development, and fresh WC’s seem to be imported with a supply. Mother Nature seems able to provide this vitamin without problem. Without some real vitamin A in their diet, these stores will deplete. It is a difficult vitamin for the hobbyist to gut-load via crickets and insects though, and such attempts are usually ineffective in our experience.
Vitamin A is a fat soluble vitamin, as is Vitamin E. It is most commonly sold in gel caps, with each gel cap containing approximately three drops of an oil solvent. It is available on-line from many suppliers, or is sold in most vitamin and health stores. The most common, and consensus most effective form of vitamin A, is a compound known as retinal palmitate. It is a common human food supplement as well. Depending on manufacturer, gel caps may contain 2000-25,000 iu’s (intravenous units) per gel cap. Read the label to insure you are buying a product with retinal palmitate as the Vitamin A. The solvent may be fish oil, which outside of its odor, is OK.

You can usually find an adequate source at such as a GNC store. When looking online, here’s a link: http://www.carlsonlabs.com/p-27-vitamin-a-palmitate-15000-iu.aspx

However, if the link has expired, google “Vitamin A Carlson Laboratories” and you should find many product options.

Real Vitamin A can also be available as the compound retinal acetate, which is synthetically produced vitamin A. While not as effective as retinal palmitate, the acetate version is more easily crystalized, and then included in some dry products, such as the ZooMed vitamin powder marketed as Reptivite.
 

Chameleon Company

Avid Member
Here is the rest of the info.

(Part 2)

Vitamin A is toxic in large quantities. As you are dealing with an oil, a strong word of caution as well. Chameleons have an extreme dislike for almost any measurable quantity of oil introduced into their mouth. While inexact, usually a negative reaction starts to become likely to occur if a quantity of oil ½ drop or greater is introduced into an adult chameleon’s mouth, and is virtually guaranteed with 2 or more drops. This can induce vomiting and inhalation of the oil, possibly death. Fortunately, the amount of oil (and vitamin A) needed to effectively dose a chameleon is usually less than 1/20th of a drop. Again, an inexact science, but depending upon the concentration of the Vitamin A in the oil, your goal is to deliver a dose that contains approximately 100 iu’s per 50g of chameleon. An exceedingly rough estimate would be 1/20th of a drop of the oil in an average adult female panther chameleon, and 2-3 times as much for a male. There is a reasonable margin for error. This can administered by puncturing one or more gel caps, and wetting a Q-tip with the oil, so that is is wet, but not dripping. You can then grab the chameleon behind the head, and when it says “Ahhhh”, touch the Q-tip to its inner gum, etc. It will likely chomp down, then let go of the Q-tip once released itself. Or, if you are able to hand-feed, swab the back of a cricket or such with a smear of the oil, and then coax your chameleon into eating it.

As a rule, we recommend this treatment to all adult chameleons once every two weeks. If an animal is showing symptoms of Vitamin A deficiency, such as eye closing with no other apparent malady, we recommend the dose daily for five days, then once every two weeks. In such cases where Vitamin A deficiency is the problem, and it is caught early, the eyes usually improve on the third or fourth day. In animals where treatment has been delayed, improvement can take up to 2-3 weeks, except in cases where the treatment has been delayed too long and become beyond repair. Good luck.
 

orchids2

New Member
It says to do this for "all" adult chams....should this be a part of all adults or just those adults exhibiting a deficiency?
 

TC1144

New Member
I have got him to open his eye but it looks a little hazy like there's some shed or infection in there not sure. he opens it for a minute to see where he is going then closes it and goes to sleep? but still no sunken in or swollen eye. its been 5 days.
 

porterco3

New Member
Chameleon Company,
Thank you for the detailed info, I too am haveing this problem I have 4 cages all set up the same, Do the supplements daily with d3 and vit bi weekly. My two veilds are fine and my two panthers just starting the one eye thing about 2 weeks ago both eat and drink fine and are normal other than not wanting to keep their eye open. I will try the Vit A for sure.
 

carol5208

Chameleon Enthusiast
Chameleon Company,
Thank you for the detailed info, I too am haveing this problem I have 4 cages all set up the same, Do the supplements daily with d3 and vit bi weekly. My two veilds are fine and my two panthers just starting the one eye thing about 2 weeks ago both eat and drink fine and are normal other than not wanting to keep their eye open. I will try the Vit A for sure.
you are not supposed to supplementing with the d3 daily. It should be bi-monthly also. Calcium without d3 everyday. Overtime, too much d3 can prove to be a bad thing as with any vitamin that is given excessively.
 

ataraxia

Avid Member
I have got him to open his eye but it looks a little hazy like there's some shed or infection in there not sure. he opens it for a minute to see where he is going then closes it and goes to sleep? but still no sunken in or swollen eye. its been 5 days.
If you have a haze on the eye, it is more than likely not a vitA issue. Have pictures? Sounds like you need to take him to a vet. Could be a infection, could be damage caused from lighting or even some sort of genetic problem.
http://www.arav.org/find-a-vet/

Chameleon Company,
Thank you for the detailed info, I too am haveing this problem I have 4 cages all set up the same, Do the supplements daily with d3 and vit bi weekly. My two veilds are fine and my two panthers just starting the one eye thing about 2 weeks ago both eat and drink fine and are normal other than not wanting to keep their eye open. I will try the Vit A for sure.
It would be best to start your own thread. So you can be helped directly. When you do start your thread it would be best that you include the information needed from the "how to ask for help form". Veileds are not as sensitive to Vit A sources where some panthers are. I have seen this first hand where a group of panthers are given the same schedule and one will need a little extra attention. At any rate, from what you have including so far. I would not give your animals calcium with D3 every feeding. This can cause the animal hardships and eventually closing the eyes. When you are filling out the form be sure to list the brand and type of vitamin used. Some panthers need a preformed source of vit A. A product called reptivite or repashy cal plus have this form in there product.
 

porterco3

New Member
Sorry That is how I supplement, My typing sucks I meant to say ... I supplement daily, and with d3 and vit bi weekly. I will check what brand vit I have been using

thank you
 

porterco3

New Member
At this point I have been using Zoo Med Repti calcium one with and 0ne without D3. As for the vitamin supplement I have two different ones which would be better

1. Repashy Supermin dust Micro fine powder it says contains both Preformed Vit A and beta carotene

2. Rep-cal Herptivite with Beta-carotene

I bought the Vit A gel caps listed above and after two days they seem to be getting a little better but still need some time
 

TC1144

New Member
I guess sometimes they just cant be fixed took scrooge to a local vet friend of a friend since i couldn't get him to snap out of it and neither could the vet. rip scrooge hes the profile pic well what can you do. thank you all for the advice.
 
Top Bottom