Not what i was expecting

EriaKadu1332

New Member
I received a pair of chams that were sold under the guise of F. Lateralis lateralis.
But then I noticed something was off.
For starters, the axillary pits are incredibly prominent and they have a higher "brow" ridge than my other lats.
My other l lats are blue/green whereas these are a brighter, more rich color of green. The male in particular is almost an emerald color, nearly devoid of the white patterns and markings of a normal lateralis except for one white line along his body length on either side.
The female is a whole other story. She is younger, smaller than all my males, also with prominent brow ridges and axillary pits. She is a bright neon yellow and black. Her neck turns red with yellow striping and she looks so much like the colors of a female furcifer minor I've seen in a photo from Frank Payne.

With this, I was told this pair is Furcifer Viridis. However, after nearly a month and a half,, the female has not turned pink, as I have read is the case with that species. The male is slightly bigger than my lateralis lateralis males, but not by much. Again, the female is pretty young still so still pretty small.. Would they be a furcifer lateralis major? If so, who would have info on this species as far as proper care and breeding? Thanks in advance.
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Mendez

Avid Member
When it comes to furcifer major, lateralis, and viridis, I am truly out of my depths. With that said, here are some good articles that will tell you the weather conditions (humidity, high/low temperature) of each and a little bit about their appearance.

Furcifer Viridis: https://www.madcham.de/en/furcifer-viridis/
Furcifer Lateralis: https://www.madcham.de/en/furcifer-lateralis/
Furcifer Major: https://www.madcham.de/en/furcifer-major/

The lateralis article also mentions viridis and major. Hopefully, this can help you until an expert can weigh in.

P.S--your chams are beautiful!

Sorry I couldn't be of more help. Though it seems like you already know what you are talking about. Your chams seem like they're in good hands--you sound like an expert.

I'll keep researching and then get back to you about what I think your chams are.
 

Mendez

Avid Member
Does this guy have axillary pits? I don't see any pit. Furcifer major is the only one out of the three (lateralis, major, viridis) to not have any pits. If they have pits, it could either be viridis or lateralis.
 

EriaKadu1332

New Member
Does this guy have axillary pits? I don't see any pit. Furcifer major is the only one out of the three (lateralis, major, viridis) to not have any pits. If they have pits, it could either be viridis or lateralis.
All 5 have pits under their arms. The newest 2 have more distinct pits than my verified lateralis
 

Mendez

Avid Member
All 5 have pits under their arms. The newest 2 have more distinct pits than my verified lateralis
Well, then if the two new ones have pits, then that means they shouldn't be major. Though it seems like major could have shallow pits. I see the pits on the female. If the pits are prominent like you say, then I would say that they are not major. And if the female isn't turning pink, well...it's hard to say at what age they start showing those colors (whether it's at birth or developed at a certain age).

It's hard to tell. They could either be a different form of lateralis or they could be viridis due to the prominent pits. I don't own any lateralis so I think deciding between which species comes up to what your eyes see. Since you noticed that they look different and have differing morphological features, this could be your gut instinct telling you that they are not lateralis.

I see that viridis come from hotter climates--but this doesn't mean that they are out basking during peak hours. I would keep them exactly like your lateralis and see how they respond. If they are under the basking light for a longer time than your lateralis, then you can try slightly higher temps. Ultimately, the temps you provide them should come down to your observations.
 

EriaKadu1332

New Member
Well, then if the two new ones have pits, then that means they shouldn't be major. Though it seems like major could have shallow pits. I see the pits on the female. If the pits are prominent like you say, then I would say that they are not major. And if the female isn't turning pink, well...it's hard to say at what age they start showing those colors (whether it's at birth or developed at a certain age).

It's hard to tell. They could either be a different form of lateralis or they could be viridis due to the prominent pits. I don't own any lateralis so I think deciding between which species comes up to what your eyes see. Since you noticed that they look different and have differing morphological features, this could be your gut instinct telling you that they are not lateralis.

I see that viridis come from hotter climates--but this doesn't mean that they are out basking during peak hours. I would keep them exactly like your lateralis and see how they respond. If they are under the basking light for a longer time than your lateralis, then you can try slightly higher temps. Ultimately, the temps you provide them should come down to your observations.
Thank you for your help and info. I appreciate it
 
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