New Veiled Chameleon yellow raised spot

Veilcoveredeyes

New Member
Hello community,

I just purchased a juvenile cham at a local pet store. It wasnt until I got home i noticed a raised yellow bump on him. Going to take him the the vet but wondered if anyone has seen something like this or i should be concerned.
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Veilcoveredeyes

New Member
Nice and big! Are you running T5Ho uvb or the coil screw in UVB lights?


Haha yes couldn't resistance turning this old cabinet into a cham villa. I run UVB screw in lights. Have you ever seen something like that spot? Ive searched the forums but couldnt find anything similar.
 

Beman

Chameleon Enthusiast
Haha yes couldn't resistance turning this old cabinet into a cham villa. I run UVB screw in lights. Have you ever seen something like that spot? Ive searched the forums but couldnt find anything similar.
No, I have not seen anything like that. I did tag in two people that may know what it is.

Are they the standard UVB coil bulbs or the 2 in 1 heat and UVB bulbs?
 

Veilcoveredeyes

New Member
No, I have not seen anything like that. I did tag in two people that may know what it is.

Are they the standard UVB coil bulbs or the 2 in 1 heat and UVB bulbs?


Thanks for tagging them hopefully someone knows. Its a standard bulb. Do you reccomend 2 in 1?
 

Beman

Chameleon Enthusiast
Thanks for tagging them hopefully someone knows. Its a standard bulb. Do you reccomend 2 in 1?
The best for your settup would be a t5 HO fixture running the length of your cabinet. It will also push light down into the enclosure for you. I would do a dual or a quad for that set up. So if you do a dual it would be 1 5.0 or 6% Arcadia uvb bulb and the second bulbs would be a daylight bulb which gives you brightness. I quad is wider but has 4 bulbs. WIth this one same thing you want it to be the length of the enclosure. you would get a 10.0 or a12% arcadia uvb bulb for this one though then it has 3 additional daylight bulbs. www.lightyourreptiles.com is a great place to get fixtures.

With either of these you want your basking level at 7-8 inches for the cham to get the right UVB levels.

With the screw in bulbs you end up with a high risk of MBD in chams due to them not being adequate. The 2 in 1 bulbs are much too strong to use on indoor enclosures. So the T5 would be the best one for your set up. :)
 

Veilcoveredeyes

New Member
The best for your settup would be a t5 HO fixture running the length of your cabinet. It will also push light down into the enclosure for you. I would do a dual or a quad for that set up. So if you do a dual it would be 1 5.0 or 6% Arcadia uvb bulb and the second bulbs would be a daylight bulb which gives you brightness. I quad is wider but has 4 bulbs. WIth this one same thing you want it to be the length of the enclosure. you would get a 10.0 or a12% arcadia uvb bulb for this one though then it has 3 additional daylight bulbs. www.lightyourreptiles.com is a great place to get fixtures.

With either of these you want your basking level at 7-8 inches for the cham to get the right UVB levels.

With the screw in bulbs you end up with a high risk of MBD in chams due to them not being adequate. The 2 in 1 bulbs are much too strong to use on indoor enclosures. So the T5 would be the best one for your set up. :)


Wow! Thank you for this information. I'll put the villa under construction for the lighting renovations ;) The last thing I want to do is cause unnecessary problems for him. I appreciate you're feedback.
 

Beman

Chameleon Enthusiast
Wow! Thank you for this information. I'll put the villa under construction for the lighting renovations ;) The last thing I want to do is cause unnecessary problems for him. I appreciate you're feedback.
Your very welcome. :)
If you want to fill this out with detail we can give you additional feedback. In case you were given incorrect info on husbandry this is a great way to catch it early before you have cham health issues.

Here is some recommended information to include when asking for help in the health clinic forum. By providing this information you will receive more accurate and beneficial responses. It might not be necessary to answer all these questions, but the more you provide the better. Please remember that even the most knowledgeable person can only guess at what your problem may be. Only an experienced reptile veterinarian who can directly examine your animal can give a true diagnosis of your chameleon's health.


Chameleon Info:

  • Your Chameleon - The species, sex, and age of your chameleon. How long has it been in your care?
  • Handling - How often do you handle your chameleon?
  • Feeding - What are you feeding your cham? What amount? What is the schedule? How are you gut-loading your feeders?
  • Supplements - What brand and type of calcium and vitamin products are you dusting your feeders with and what is the schedule?
  • Watering - What kind of watering technique do you use? How often and how long to you mist? Do you see your chameleon drinking?
  • Fecal Description - Briefly note colors and consistency from recent droppings. Has this chameleon ever been tested for parasites?
  • History - Any previous information about your cham that might be useful to others when trying to help you.

Cage Info:

  • Cage Type - Describe your cage (Glass, Screen, Combo?) What are the dimensions?
  • Lighting - What brand, model, and types of lighting are you using? What is your daily lighting schedule?
  • Temperature - What temp range have you created (cage floor to basking spot)? Lowest overnight temp? How do you measure these temps?
  • Humidity - What are your humidity levels? How are you creating and maintaining these levels? What do you use to measure humidity?
  • Plants - Are you using live plants? If so, what kind?
  • Placement - Where is your cage located? Is it near any fans, air vents, or high traffic areas? At what height is the top of the cage relative to your room floor?
  • Location - Where are you geographically located?
 

Veilcoveredeyes

New Member
Now that he's shed I found that he's actually covered in spots. :( Im not going to handle him anymore as hes already stressed with the changes of today but wanted everyone to see. I know better than to buy animals from a pet store but everytime ive been in there he's just "called" out to me like please take me out of this place and couldnt resist him anymore. People say you cant bond with reptiles but i disagree. This little guy has my heart ❤ He looks like hes had a rough start to life. I have a house full of rescue animals and currently have a bearded dragon, leopard gecko, 2 sugar gliders, and four dogs... and now this sweet guy. Ugh sorry just cant stand to see animals suffering.

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Beman

Chameleon Enthusiast
Now that he's shed I found that he's actually covered in spots. :( Im not going to handle him anymore as hes already stressed with the changes of today but wanted everyone to see. I know better than to buy animals from a pet store but everytime ive been in there he's just "called" out to me like please take me out of this place and couldnt resist him anymore. People say you cant bond with reptiles but i disagree. This little guy has my heart ❤ He looks like hes had a rough start to life. I have a house full of rescue animals and currently have a bearded dragon, leopard gecko, 2 sugar gliders, and four dogs... and now this sweet guy. Ugh sorry just cant stand to see animals suffering.

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Yeah I would not handle any more today. Call the vet and try to get him in asap. Make sure it is an experienced reptile Vet. I found this online. Here is the link http://www.anapsid.org/lesions.html

There are a variety of reasons why your lizard may have one or more small, oozing lesions (flat sores or skin-covered bumps) somewhere on his body. Because they all exhibit very much alike, there is generally no way a herp keeper can tell what the underlying cause is, so it is important to have these lesions and bumps checked out by a reptile veterinarian.


The fluid oozing from the skin in between the scales or from lesions themselves are a combination of the intercellular fluid and fluids from ruptured cells. This fluid acts as a carrier for the virus or bacteria causing the systemic or localized infection.


Organisms that can cause bumps, lesions or other dermatitis include:


  • abscesses
  • adenoviruses (lizards)
  • Salmonella
  • fungal infection (may also be dry - see Black Spot article)
  • herpesvirus (snakes, lizards, chelonians, amphibians)
  • papillomas (lizards)
  • papilloma-like viruses (Bolivian side-necked turtles, to date)
  • paramyxovirus (snakes; may cause caseous plaques in mouth like stomatitis, also RTI symptoms)
  • parasitic worms (see below)
  • poxvirus (caiman, lizards)
 

Beman

Chameleon Enthusiast
Another option, if you just show up at the vet without an appointment, very few vets will turn you away. You may have to wait a while but most of the time they will find a way to squeeze you in. After all they are animal lovers too!
You big softie you! :p
 

AnamCara

Chameleon Enthusiast
Just as a precaution -- and you are likely already on this -- but be sure to keep him away from your other animals. Especially your other herps. Keep him isolated as much as possible.

Unknowns create more unknowns. Good luck!
 
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