new to the forum. got a few questions.

tim2505

New Member
Hello people of chameleonforums.com,

I am new to the site, my name is Tim and I am English but now living in Austria. First of all I would like to say thank you to you all for the information I have been finding on this forum, it’s been so helpful.

Well I have always been interested in owning a chameleon since I was a boy 20 odd years ago! But was never in the right situation….. now I think I am ready to take one on. So I was thinking that I will spend the next 6 months to a year really researching and getting my facts straight (want to be the best dad I can.) so I have a few questions.

Anyone know of any breeders in Austria?

What is the most difficult thing about keeping a chameleon?

If there are any negative things about a chameleon what are they?

But really any advice would be most appreciated. Look forward to seeing what you all have to say.

Thanks a lot.

Tim.
 

carol5208

Chameleon Enthusiast
Hi Tim and welcome to the forums! I do not know of any breeders in Austria but maybe someone else does. The biggest downside for me in keeping chameleons is the live feeders you have to keep. If you don't breed your own they can get very costly and every feeder you feed, needs food! Oh and they poop too cause they eat, so their containers have to be kept clean and sanitary on a regular basis. It is not advised to feed just one prey like crickets, so you finding yourself housing 4-5 different kinds of bugs! Chameleons are super clean. They don't smell and really neither does their poop! The great thing is they only poop every couple of days or everyday and their poop and pee(called a urate) is all in one! The other negative thing is you just can't own one! They are addicting like potato chips! lol
 

KingJulian

New Member
Welcome to the forum!! What kind of cham are you looking into getting? I do have to say that there are some scary downsides to owning chams. For me, it's the fear of the unknown. You always read so many things that can happen to them and it's scary. But there are way more good things! They are awesome animals, and for not really being able to do much of anything, mine always puts a smile on my face :)
 

Djturna4thakidz

Established Member
For me the main downside is travel. If you want to leave for 2-3 days that feasable with an automated misting system but any longer and you have to have a sitter that knows about chams take care of them. It is best if your pet sitter also keeps chams because I have heard a lot of horror stories on here about bad pet sitters not taking proper care.
 

mowryrd

New Member
I have only had my chameleon for a few months but have, and still keep many other reptiles. THe bigest differance I see is that my snakes and geckos can do fine on there own for days ( if I go away on vaction or somthing) but the chameleon requires daily care especial if it's a baby. So you'll need a reptile sitter if you art going to be home for a bit. A mister on a timer helps but you can't just leave them for a week like a snake.
 

tim2505

New Member
Thanks so much for the replies. I have a very good friend who I trust who would be around the cham a lot before I would be thinking of going on holiday.
As for the cham I am after, I thought about starting with a veiled but after a little research I have been thinking of a panther mainly because of the colors. What do you think are the differences between them, as far as looking after them?

Thanks again.
 

KingJulian

New Member
Veileds and panthers are two of the more easier chams for beginners. The difference is which you prefer. Personally I've heard panthers are a little more laid back as far as handling, however you will get lots of people who say you shouldn't handle them on a daily basis. The best thing to do is research. Get which one makes you happier. I researched an prepared for mine for 6 months before getting him and I was still completely overwhelmed for the first month or 2. Best of luck in your decision :)
 

tim2505

New Member
Veileds and panthers are two of the more easier chams for beginners. The difference is which you prefer. Personally I've heard panthers are a little more laid back as far as handling, however you will get lots of people who say you shouldn't handle them on a daily basis. The best thing to do is research. Get which one makes you happier. I researched an prepared for mine for 6 months before getting him and I was still completely overwhelmed for the first month or 2. Best of luck in your decision :)

Can I ask which breed you went with first? For me as I know handling is not what chameleons are about, color to me is important.
 

tim2505

New Member
wow he is beautiful. I was wondering if any other people had any input into the negative side of owning a cham?
 

mcanham

Member
This could get overwhelming, downsides are you never know whats best. You can look at others and base you husbandry on that but these little creatures all seem to be unique. You worry about supplementation, dehydration, climate, humidity, stress, power outages, UVB, cats (from other posts this seems common), hunger strikes, complete sheds, one eye closed, both eyes closed, sleeping during the day, parasites, egg bound females, debris in eyes,gut loading feeders, should I use repashy cal plus or sticky tongue farms miner-all, natural sunlight, UVB bulb putting out enough UVB, basking temps, etc. I'm sure I could think of others but these are my daily worries it seems. There just like having kids but more expensive! They are very cool animals and just like kids well worth the trouble. Good luck and make sure whatever you get it's captive born.
 

tim2505

New Member
This could get overwhelming, downsides are you never know whats best. You can look at others and base you husbandry on that but these little creatures all seem to be unique. You worry about supplementation, dehydration, climate, humidity, stress, power outages, UVB, cats (from other posts this seems common), hunger strikes, complete sheds, one eye closed, both eyes closed, sleeping during the day, parasites, egg bound females, debris in eyes,gut loading feeders, should I use repashy cal plus or sticky tongue farms miner-all, natural sunlight, UVB bulb putting out enough UVB, basking temps, etc. I'm sure I could think of others but these are my daily worries it seems. There just like having kids but more expensive! They are very cool animals and just like kids well worth the trouble. Good luck and make sure whatever you get it's captive born.

wow thanks for the input. I imagine it is hard as to there being so many factors involved. the only reason i am asking for the downsides is to make sure I have the full picture before before I commit myself. I am reading as much as I can on the forum but asking questions and getting first hand answers is so good. thank you so much for spending the time to answer.

Tim.
 

tim2505

New Member
Welcome to the forum!! What kind of cham are you looking into getting? I do have to say that there are some scary downsides to owning chams. For me, it's the fear of the unknown. You always read so many things that can happen to them and it's scary. But there are way more good things! They are awesome animals, and for not really being able to do much of anything, mine always puts a smile on my face :)

well been looking around today and the panther sambava looks unreal. saying that finding them for sale in europe is hard. oh and the price.... have you any breeds that come close to the sambava as in colour?

thanks for taking the time out to answer my questions.

cheers

Tim
 
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