Name these chams

Kent67

Retired Moderator
I did not take these photos so hopefully the vacationers who posted them won't mind me linking to them. Know what they are?



 

Kent67

Retired Moderator
Aaah, that was quick. Nice work. I'll have to make it more difficult for Chris next time :) C. amber? I was actually stumped on that one. I found some other pics of it, calling it brev which it clearly isn't. Do you know if it is named for Montagne d'Ambre? These pics are supposed to be from around Perinet. Craziest spikes I've seen:

 

Chris Anderson

Dr. House of Chameleons
Staff member
There is a C. brevicornis group member from Mt. Amber which is green and has long been considered different but only recently described as such. It was named C. amber after the locale and is what I thought this animal was. Unfortunately, the photos don't match any species described from the Perinet area (C. brevicorne and C. crypticum)...I guess I'll need to email Raxworthy the photos and see what his take on it is as the key I just pulled out on the group is hard to be definitive without the specimen in the hand. I'll let you know what I find out.

Chris
 

Kent67

Retired Moderator
Interesting. Well, I've found two different sets of traveler's pics with that species. Both websites say Perinet or Andasibe as the location. One has pictures of C. oshaughnessyi, labeled as parsonii, in the Andasibe section so it very well could be a mistake. The other site has the picture from my first post under the heading of Tana/Perinet as well though.
 

Kent67

Retired Moderator
There is a C. brevicornis group member from Mt. Amber which is green and has long been considered different but only recently described as such. It was named C. amber after the locale and is what I thought this animal was. Unfortunately, the photos don't match any species described from the Perinet area (C. brevicorne and C. crypticum)...I guess I'll need to email Raxworthy the photos and see what his take on it is as the key I just pulled out on the group is hard to be definitive without the specimen in the hand. I'll let you know what I find out.

Chris
Chris,

If you have it, there are some pictures of what I assume are now called C. amber in CIN #36 along with a comparison of a brev from Ranomafana. The two are definitely different with the C. amber having larger occipital flaps, almost as large as cucullatus. Neither of them look like the photos I posted earlier in this thread so....if we find a new species, can it be named after me? haha :cool:
 

Chris Anderson

Dr. House of Chameleons
Staff member
hairfarm - send me an email ([email protected]) and I can forward you a pdf of the article describing the C. amber and a few other new C. brevicorne complex members. It has photos of them all but none have the dorsal crest of the animals in the photos you posted so I'm less and less confident on their ID.

Chris

PS: Its Chamaeleo (Chamaeleo) zeylanicus from India and Sri Lanka
 

Kent67

Retired Moderator
PS: Its Chamaeleo (Chamaeleo) zeylanicus from India and Sri Lanka
Damn, you're good. I would appreciate the pdf....I've been searching all the online article databases from my school but we apparently aren't subscribed to any that have the pdf for download. We do have it in the library though....sending email....
 

toddmkeller

Member
guys - seriously, if you were to read the ENTIRE post, you would realize two things.

1. This post is from July 2007, making it 25 months old!
2. The animals have already been successfully identified. It just makes you look like an idiot when you are randomly typing out names in binomial nomenclature.

See ya,

Todd
 
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