large wood grub - safe to feed ?

little leaf

Avid Member
we have started our wood splitting - and I find these often in the logs - it is about 1 1/2 " long- so juicy :p can I feed these - I think they are a big brown beetle- and I know they can not be put back in the ground- I used to know what it was - but they take like 2 yrs in old wood to hatch - and once out prematurely, they die - I know there are no pesticides on them - can this be a snack ?
thanks :)
 

Attachments

  • 002.jpg
    002.jpg
    238.8 KB · Views: 759
  • 003.jpg
    003.jpg
    241.2 KB · Views: 284

juice28

New Member
Not sure about eating...but I HATE them lol...those things bite! Got bit as a kid....been traumatized ever since LMAO
 

DanSB

Avid Member
I don't know but I would ask myself a few questions:

Is the wood they are in toxic?

What do they eat is it toxic?

What is the possibility they have parasites, some pathogen?

Since termites are ok to feed I would assume these are too but I really don't know anything about their natural history to say with any certainty.
 
eh, if bear grylls eats em, your cham prob can
bear-grylls-eats-grub-o.gif


scarabs (and their larvae) arent toxic, but might give your chameleon a pinch if he doesnt chomp them quick enough

parasites are a risk with any WC food

they eat roots and composting vegetative matter, but arent terribly hardy, so if they're eating something toxic it would probably kill them (ie black walnut or a similar toxic tree). There was even a study done that showed oils from plants like garlic and thyme proved to be fatal to the grubs (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23448028)

Id try it out, the grubs dont really move around a lot if I can remember right, so he might not even be all that appealing
 

chameleoman

Established Member
eh, if bear grylls eats em, your cham prob can
bear-grylls-eats-grub-o.gif


scarabs (and their larvae) arent toxic, but might give your chameleon a pinch if he doesnt chomp them quick enough

parasites are a risk with any WC food

they eat roots and composting vegetative matter, but arent terribly hardy, so if they're eating something toxic it would probably kill them (ie black walnut or a similar toxic tree). There was even a study done that showed oils from plants like garlic and thyme proved to be fatal to the grubs (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23448028)

Id try it out, the grubs dont really move around a lot if I can remember right, so he might not even be all that appealing

I WAS JUST GONNA SAY TOO EAT THEM LIKE BEAR GRILLS!!!! They look so good to eat! I've eaten cooked horn worms, silkworms, butter worms, dubia roaches and crickets. On man vs wild and survivor man they cook them on the coals of a small fire, it looked good I've always wanted to try those wood grubs.
 

junglefries

Avid Member
if you feed

Please video if you do. as others may see do's or don't. anything extra or different you can feed your cham is a plus. different vitamins and minerals. plus encouraging variety. mine go ballistic for preying mantis and bumblee bees.
 

laurie

Retired Moderator
Cheryl I see no problem feeding those. But you should feed them to your dogs, kids, or yourself.:rolleyes: they look pretty big for a Cham, plus I would not want to chance one of mine getting bit.
 

Deevo

New Member
I've seen a few people now feeding bumble bees to their chams. Is this really safe? What about the risk of getting stung?? Is the bumblebees fur an irritant ?

Sorry to highjack the thread but someone's reply above reminded me to ask this question.
 

bbprinting

New Member
I've seen a few people now feeding bumble bees to their chams. Is this really safe? What about the risk of getting stung?? Is the bumblebees fur an irritant ?

Sorry to highjack the thread but someone's reply above reminded me to ask this question.

I've seen this also but they always remove the stinger first.
 

spawn

Member
You guys baby your chams too much. Remove the stingers from bees? Really?? You don't think chams eat bees in the wild? Get out of here with that.
 

DanSB

Avid Member
You guys baby your chams too much. Remove the stingers from bees? Really?? You don't think chams eat bees in the wild? Get out of here with that.

Chams in the wild have an average lifespan of 2 to 3 years. Most people here are hoping to improve on that and not risking mouth injuries is just one small thing many do.

I don't know if it is a legitimate risk, but it might be so why risk it?
 

sandrachameleon

Chameleon Enthusiast
there are so many prey choices, why choose bumble bees or honey bees? those wild populations are necessary for pollination - please don't kill them unnecessarily.
 

little leaf

Avid Member
well, I did chop off 1 of his big mouth parts with nail clippers - I am sure he could have given a nasty bite - I showed it to the panthers - one RAN AWAY - (Capone - lol) and Max looked at me like " YOU eat it ! " :cool: and I know Olive would have loved it, but I think it was just a bit big for her- so I grilled it, it taste like chicken ;) ( JK ! ) it taste like rabbit :p :p
as for bees - NEVER - I now look at the honey bee as "rare" in our area - and would dig it out of Olive's mouth if I saw her with one and let it go - and the yellow jackets - no way :eek:
I have found more of those, but left them for the wild birds - I really do wish I could put them back in another log to live - but you can tell they start to die about the min/ they hit the air :(
 

natureboy86

New Member
I WAS JUST GONNA SAY TOO EAT THEM LIKE BEAR GRILLS!!!! They look so good to eat! I've eaten cooked horn worms, silkworms, butter worms, dubia roaches and crickets. On man vs wild and survivor man they cook them on the coals of a small fire, it looked good I've always wanted to try those wood grubs.

lol really? Soooo, you occasionally take one of your cham's feeders, throw em on the pan, cook them and eat them? Did you sautee them? :p
 
Top Bottom