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Gracetheace

New Member
Hello, I’m grace and I have a male veiled chameleon. I’ve had him since June, so he’s roughly 7 or so months. His brother from the same clutch is fully grown while my little dude is still relatively small. I’m wondering if I can get some insight as to why he’s smaller and not full grown by now?

Info:
Reptibreeze XL cage (24x24x48)
Male veiled chameleon 7-8 months old
rotates from crickets to meal worms every two weeks
Gets zoo med repticalcium without D3 once a month
I spray his enclosure twice a day
Poop is brown and white
Eats twice a day
Has plenty of vines and branches to climb on (3 6ft branches and 2 6ft vines)
100 watt daylight blue bulb
5.0 tropical UVB bulb
 

ERKleRose

Chameleon Enthusiast
Hello, I’m grace and I have a male veiled chameleon. I’ve had him since June, so he’s roughly 7 or so months. His brother from the same clutch is fully grown while my little dude is still relatively small. I’m wondering if I can get some insight as to why he’s smaller and not full grown by now?

Info:
Reptibreeze XL cage (24x24x48)
Male veiled chameleon 7-8 months old
rotates from crickets to meal worms every two weeks
Gets zoo med repticalcium without D3 once a month
I spray his enclosure twice a day
Poop is brown and white
Eats twice a day
Has plenty of vines and branches to climb on (3 6ft branches and 2 6ft vines)
100 watt daylight blue bulb
5.0 tropical UVB bulb
I already see some husbandry changes that need to made, so if you fill out this form, then all feedback can be on one post. Also pics of your chameleon and his set up are needed.

Chameleon Info:
  • Your Chameleon - The species, sex, and age of your chameleon. How long has it been in your care?
  • Handling - How often do you handle your chameleon?
  • Feeding - What are you feeding your cham? What amount? What is the schedule? How are you gut-loading your feeders?
  • Supplements - What brand and type of calcium and vitamin products are you dusting your feeders with and what is the schedule?
  • Watering - What kind of watering technique do you use? How often and how long to you mist? Do you see your chameleon drinking?
  • Fecal Description - Briefly note colors and consistency from recent droppings. Has this chameleon ever been tested for parasites?
  • History - Any previous information about your cham that might be useful to others when trying to help you.

Cage Info:
  • Cage Type - Describe your cage (Glass, Screen, Combo?) What are the dimensions?
  • Lighting - What brand, model, and types of lighting are you using? What is your daily lighting schedule?
  • Temperature - What temp range have you created (cage floor to basking spot)? Lowest overnight temp? How do you measure these temps?
  • Humidity - What are your humidity levels? How are you creating and maintaining these levels? What do you use to measure humidity?
  • Plants - Are you using live plants? If so, what kind?
  • Placement - Where is your cage located? Is it near any fans, air vents, or high traffic areas? At what height is the top of the cage relative to your room floor?
  • Location - Where are you geographically located?

Current Problem - The current problem you are concerned about.

--------------

Please Note:
  1. The more details you provide the better and more accurate help you will receive.
  2. Photos can be very helpful.
 

Gracetheace

New Member
Chameleon Info:
  • Your Chameleon - Veiled chameleon, male, 8 months. He has been in my care since may of 2020
  • Handling- I try to handle him if he’s willing, if not I don’t force him to prevent stress
  • Feeding - I switch between large crickets, medium sized mealworms, and will occasionally feed collard greens dusted with calcium powder I have. Crickets 3-5, mealworms 5. If I have crickets I’ll feed him twice he seems to not want more than 10 a day. He will eat about 5-7 mealworms a day. I will gut load crickets with potatoes and carrots. Mealworms I’ll hit load with collard greens.
  • Supplements - Zoo med repticalcium without D3. I try to give it to him once every two weeks when I feed collard greens.
  • Watering - I have a misting spray bottle. I spray twice, maybe three times a day. I do see him drinking a minute or two after I spray.
  • Fecal Description - Brown with white droppings. They’re not liquidity. I have not tested him for parasites while he’s been in my care.
  • History - no history that I can think of other than he can be aggressive sometimes when I go to handle him. If I see that he is angry I will leave him be.

Cage Info:
  • Cage Type- I have the zoo med XL cage. 24x24x48. It’s all screen.
  • Lighting - Zoomed daylight blue reptile bulb 100w. Zoomed reprising 5.0 UVB. I turn on the lights at 8am and turn them off at 9-10pm.
  • Temperature - I currently don’t have anything to measure temp with. The lowest temp it will get to with the lights off is 69°F.
  • Humidity - I currently don’t have anything to measure humidity levels. I spray his enclosure 2-3x a day.
  • Plants - I have fake vines. I also have a ficus benjimina that I recently took out due to lack of space.
  • Placement - The cage sits on a end table. The highest point of the cage is 5ft off the ground. He lives in my bedroom and no one is in there except myself. He’s next to a window for some additional heat.
  • Location - i am located in central Texas.

Current Problem - wondering why he hasn’t grown much since I’ve gotten him. He’s roughly 10” nose to tail.
 
Last edited:

Gracetheace

New Member
9D0E80B2-0399-49CC-AEDE-DEF0242CACFA.jpeg
7294EC11-2A77-4A25-9D33-7EF91F28CB18.jpeg
 

ERKleRose

Chameleon Enthusiast
Okay, so a lot of changes need to be made. My feedback will be in red. I’m attaching resource links and care images at the bottom, too. I also really encourage you to read through every module and listen to as many podcasts as possible on The Chameleon Academy’s site.
Chameleon Info:
  • Your Chameleon - Veiled chameleon, male, 8 months. He has been in my care since may of 2020
  • Handling- I try to handle him if he’s willing, if not I don’t force him to prevent stress
  • Feeding - I switch between large crickets, medium sized mealworms, and will occasionally feed collard greens dusted with calcium powder I have. Crickets 3-5, mealworms 5. If I have crickets I’ll feed him twice he seems to not want more than 10 a day. He will eat about 5-7 mealworms a day. I will gut load crickets with potatoes and carrots. Mealworms I’ll hit load with collard greens. Contrary to some info out there, veiled chameleons only need to be fed insects, no vegetation. Mealworms are a no-no for feeding chameleons, too, so stop feeding ASAP. Crickets are fine, but healthier options are available, and variety is key for feeders and gutloads. Feed the insects collard greens instead, along with multiple choices from the list bellow. If the potato isn’t sweet potato, stop feeding that, too. Care images for healthy feeders and gutloads are linked below. All feeder insects should either be fed 24/7 with healthy and quality gutloads or feed healthy and quality gutloads anywhere from overnight to an hour or few before feeding them off. He should be fed every other day around 30 minutes after lights come on.
  • Supplements - Zoo med repticalcium without D3. I try to give it to him once every two weeks when I feed collard greens. Your supplement schedule is off and lacks all that is needed for a healthy chameleon. For needed added supplements, since you already have the Zoo Med Repti-Calcium without D3, buy Zoo Med Reptivite with D3. You will use the calcium without D3 on every feeding, except for once every two weeks, when you’ll use the Reptivite with D3. All feeders should be lightly dusted in the proper supplement for that day right before feeding them off. How old is your calcium? As a general rule of thumb, all supplements should be replaced every 5 months to make sure they are at full strength. Obviously toss if expired, as well.
  • Watering - I have a misting spray bottle. I spray twice, maybe three times a day. I do see him drinking a minute or two after I spray. How long is each misting session? During the day, they should be a minimum of 2-5 minutes long. Having an automated mister really helps with that!
  • Fecal Description - Brown with white droppings. They’re not liquidity. I have not tested him for parasites while he’s been in my care. With your concerns, and for general peace of mind, have a fresh fecal sample taken to an experienced chameleon vet for a fecal float to test for parasites. Also taking him into the vet for a check-up, x-rays, bloodwork, etc. would be a great idea!
  • History - no history that I can think of other than he can be aggressive sometimes when I go to handle him. If I see that he is angry I will leave him be. Where did you get him from?

Cage Info:
  • Cage Type- I have the zoo med XL cage. 24x24x48. It’s all screen.
  • Lighting - Zoomed daylight blue reptile bulb 100w. Zoomed reprising 5.0 UVB. I turn on the lights at 8am and turn them off at 9-10pm. You need to replace both of those bulbs ASAP! Get a T5 High Output linear fixture and a T5 High Output linear UVB bulb of the same size. Get either Zoo Med 5.0 or Arcadia 6% for the bulb strength. Zoo Med UVB bulbs need to be replaced every 6 months, while Arcadias are only once per year. The linear fixture needs to be at least the length of your enclosure (24”) or a size up (36”). It should be placed over the middle part of your enclosure, either diagonal across or straight across the middle. Also getting a UVI Solarmeter is a worthwhile investment! It gives you accurate readings of UVI measurements for anywhere in the enclosure, outdoors, etc. Get a regular white light incandescent bulb from the hardware store for his basking bulb. You’ll have to play around with wattages until you get one that produces the correct temperature on his basking branch. Both his UVB and heat bulbs (along with any plant bulbs) should be all on together for twelve hours and all off for 12 hours. Getting a timer for lights helps a lot with this! No lights at all at night!
  • Temperature - I currently don’t have anything to measure temp with. The lowest temp it will get to with the lights off is 69°F. Temperatures are super important! While at the hardware store, pick up some digital hygrometer-thermometer combos (usually in the weather section) and a digital temperature gun. Place one digital hygrometer-thermometer combo by his basking branch, one near the middle height of his cage, and one near the bottom. During the day, you want his basking branch to be a few degrees under 85*F. The top of his back should read around 85*F with the temp gun. Both his heat and UVB bulbs should be around 8-9 inches away from his basking branch (which should be the highest up branch in his cage). If he’s too cold while basking at that basking temperature, increase the wattage of the heat bulb. If he’s too hot, lower the wattage. At night, a temp drop is good. They can safely withstand 50-60*F at night. If it goes below that, get a super small wattage ceramic heat emitter. It won‘t produce any light.
  • Humidity - I currently don’t have anything to measure humidity levels. I spray his enclosure 2-3x a day. Humidity levels are crucial, too. During the day, they should be between 30-50% and up to 100% at night. If his humidity during the day allows it, only mist in the morning and late afternoon/night. At night, using a fogger/cool mist humidifier provides natural hydration. Make sure you place the tube output at the top of his cage so the fog rolls down it. Make sure to clean/disinfect/sanitize the humidifier and tubes thoroughly and often if you go that route. Otherwise, using an automated misting system (unless you want to hand mist the cage in darkness at night) helps with night humidity too! Live plants help raise and keep humidity, too, as well as offering an abundance of drinking surfaces and hiding places with their foliage!
  • Plants - I have fake vines. I also have a ficus benjimina that I recently took out due to lack of space. All fake plants and fake vines with leaves on them need to be pulled out ASAP! Veileds are notorious for taking a chomp out of anything, which can cause impaction if it isn’t something they’re supposed to eat. Only fake vines without leaves on them and properly cleaned and chameleon-safe real branches, vines, and live plants should be used in a veiled chameleon’s enclosure. Make sure to put rocks/pebbles too big for a chameleon to eat over the soil in the plant pots. You can pick up a big bag for like $5 at the hardware store.
  • Placement - The cage sits on a end table. The highest point of the cage is 5ft off the ground. He lives in my bedroom and no one is in there except myself. He’s next to a window for some additional heat. His cage shouldn’t be by a window if you don’t know his cage temps. Chameleons should only be by a window if they can’t see their reflection in them and if the window is energy-efficient enough to not alter cage temps. Is he near any vents, drafts, or fans?
  • Location - i am located in central Texas.

Current Problem - wondering why he hasn’t grown much since I’ve gotten him. He’s roughly 10” nose to tail. It could be improper husbandry, some type of parasites or something else wrong with his health, or just how he grows.

1610309491285.jpeg
1610309502855.jpeg


http://www.muchadoaboutchameleons.com/2012/04/how-to-set-up-proper-chameleon.html
https://flchams.com/chameleon-safe-plant-list/
https://www.chameleonforums.com/care/plants/
https://chameleonacademy.com/plants/ This plant list is specifically veiled-tested
https://chameleonacademy.com/veiled-chameleon-care/
https://chameleonacademy.com/setting-up-a-chameleon-cage/
https://chameleonacademy.com/choosing-and-arranging-branches/
 

ERKleRose

Chameleon Enthusiast
He also needs way more branches, vines, and foliage all over his enclosure! Make sure put the ficus back in his cage ASAP, too! Did you prepare it in any way before you put it in the cage at first?
 
Last edited:

Gracetheace

New Member
He also needs way more branches, vines, and foliage all over his enclosure! Make sure put the ficus back in his cage ASAP, too! Did you prepare it in any way before you put it in the cage at first?
I did go through each leaf and cleaned it with a damp towel just Incase there were insects or poop or something on them. That’s about all I did. I covered the holes at the bottom of the pot with a little door like fixture I made, allowing for drainage when watered but covered Incase he decided to zap it with his tongue.
 

Gracetheace

New Member
Okay, so a lot of changes need to be made. My feedback will be in red. I’m attaching resource links and care images at the bottom, too. I also really encourage you to read through every module and listen to as many podcasts as possible on The Chameleon Academy’s site.
Chameleon Info:
  • Your Chameleon - Veiled chameleon, male, 8 months. He has been in my care since may of 2020
  • Handling- I try to handle him if he’s willing, if not I don’t force him to prevent stress
  • Feeding - I switch between large crickets, medium sized mealworms, and will occasionally feed collard greens dusted with calcium powder I have. Crickets 3-5, mealworms 5. If I have crickets I’ll feed him twice he seems to not want more than 10 a day. He will eat about 5-7 mealworms a day. I will gut load crickets with potatoes and carrots. Mealworms I’ll hit load with collard greens. Contrary to some info out there, veiled chameleons only need to be fed insects, no vegetation. Mealworms are a no-no for feeding chameleons, too, so stop feeding ASAP. Crickets are fine, but healthier options are available, and variety is key for feeders and gutloads. Feed the insects collard greens instead, along with multiple choices from the list bellow. If the potato isn’t sweet potato, stop feeding that, too. Care images for healthy feeders and gutloads are linked below. All feeder insects should either be fed 24/7 with healthy and quality gutloads or feed healthy and quality gutloads anywhere from overnight to an hour or few before feeding them off. He should be fed every other day around 30 minutes after lights come on.
  • Supplements - Zoo med repticalcium without D3. I try to give it to him once every two weeks when I feed collard greens. Your supplement schedule is off and lacks all that is needed for a healthy chameleon. For needed added supplements, since you already have the Zoo Med Repti-Calcium without D3, buy Zoo Med Reptivite with D3. You will use the calcium without D3 on every feeding, except for once every two weeks, when you’ll use the Reptivite with D3. All feeders should be lightly dusted in the proper supplement for that day right before feeding them off. How old is your calcium? As a general rule of thumb, all supplements should be replaced every 5 months to make sure they are at full strength. Obviously toss if expired, as well.
  • Watering - I have a misting spray bottle. I spray twice, maybe three times a day. I do see him drinking a minute or two after I spray. How long is each misting session? During the day, they should be a minimum of 2-5 minutes long. Having an automated mister really helps with that!
  • Fecal Description - Brown with white droppings. They’re not liquidity. I have not tested him for parasites while he’s been in my care. With your concerns, and for general peace of mind, have a fresh fecal sample taken to an experienced chameleon vet for a fecal float to test for parasites. Also taking him into the vet for a check-up, x-rays, bloodwork, etc. would be a great idea!
  • History - no history that I can think of other than he can be aggressive sometimes when I go to handle him. If I see that he is angry I will leave him be. Where did you get him from?

Cage Info:
  • Cage Type- I have the zoo med XL cage. 24x24x48. It’s all screen.
  • Lighting - Zoomed daylight blue reptile bulb 100w. Zoomed reprising 5.0 UVB. I turn on the lights at 8am and turn them off at 9-10pm. You need to replace both of those bulbs ASAP! Get a T5 High Output linear fixture and a T5 High Output linear UVB bulb of the same size. Get either Zoo Med 5.0 or Arcadia 6% for the bulb strength. Zoo Med UVB bulbs need to be replaced every 6 months, while Arcadias are only once per year. The linear fixture needs to be at least the length of your enclosure (24”) or a size up (36”). It should be placed over the middle part of your enclosure, either diagonal across or straight across the middle. Also getting a UVI Solarmeter is a worthwhile investment! It gives you accurate readings of UVI measurements for anywhere in the enclosure, outdoors, etc. Get a regular white light incandescent bulb from the hardware store for his basking bulb. You’ll have to play around with wattages until you get one that produces the correct temperature on his basking branch. Both his UVB and heat bulbs (along with any plant bulbs) should be all on together for twelve hours and all off for 12 hours. Getting a timer for lights helps a lot with this! No lights at all at night!
  • Temperature - I currently don’t have anything to measure temp with. The lowest temp it will get to with the lights off is 69°F. Temperatures are super important! While at the hardware store, pick up some digital hygrometer-thermometer combos (usually in the weather section) and a digital temperature gun. Place one digital hygrometer-thermometer combo by his basking branch, one near the middle height of his cage, and one near the bottom. During the day, you want his basking branch to be a few degrees under 85*F. The top of his back should read around 85*F with the temp gun. Both his heat and UVB bulbs should be around 8-9 inches away from his basking branch (which should be the highest up branch in his cage). If he’s too cold while basking at that basking temperature, increase the wattage of the heat bulb. If he’s too hot, lower the wattage. At night, a temp drop is good. They can safely withstand 50-60*F at night. If it goes below that, get a super small wattage ceramic heat emitter. It won‘t produce any light.
  • Humidity - I currently don’t have anything to measure humidity levels. I spray his enclosure 2-3x a day. Humidity levels are crucial, too. During the day, they should be between 30-50% and up to 100% at night. If his humidity during the day allows it, only mist in the morning and late afternoon/night. At night, using a fogger/cool mist humidifier provides natural hydration. Make sure you place the tube output at the top of his cage so the fog rolls down it. Make sure to clean/disinfect/sanitize the humidifier and tubes thoroughly and often if you go that route. Otherwise, using an automated misting system (unless you want to hand mist the cage in darkness at night) helps with night humidity too! Live plants help raise and keep humidity, too, as well as offering an abundance of drinking surfaces and hiding places with their foliage!
  • Plants - I have fake vines. I also have a ficus benjimina that I recently took out due to lack of space. All fake plants and fake vines with leaves on them need to be pulled out ASAP! Veileds are notorious for taking a chomp out of anything, which can cause impaction if it isn’t something they’re supposed to eat. Only fake vines without leaves on them and properly cleaned and chameleon-safe real branches, vines, and live plants should be used in a veiled chameleon’s enclosure. Make sure to put rocks/pebbles too big for a chameleon to eat over the soil in the plant pots. You can pick up a big bag for like $5 at the hardware store.
  • Placement - The cage sits on a end table. The highest point of the cage is 5ft off the ground. He lives in my bedroom and no one is in there except myself. He’s next to a window for some additional heat. His cage shouldn’t be by a window if you don’t know his cage temps. Chameleons should only be by a window if they can’t see their reflection in them and if the window is energy-efficient enough to not alter cage temps. Is he near any vents, drafts, or fans?
  • Location - i am located in central Texas.

Current Problem - wondering why he hasn’t grown much since I’ve gotten him. He’s roughly 10” nose to tail. It could be improper husbandry, some type of parasites or something else wrong with his health, or just how he grows.

View attachment 288451 View attachment 288452


http://www.muchadoaboutchameleons.com/2012/04/how-to-set-up-proper-chameleon.html
https://flchams.com/chameleon-safe-plant-list/
https://www.chameleonforums.com/care/plants/
https://chameleonacademy.com/plants/ This plant list is specifically veiled-tested
https://chameleonacademy.com/veiled-chameleon-care/
https://chameleonacademy.com/setting-up-a-chameleon-cage/
https://chameleonacademy.com/choosing-and-arranging-branches/
I got him from a local pet store. I also thought about trying to find some decently priced real branches for my little dude but all I can find are super expensive.
 

ERKleRose

Chameleon Enthusiast
I got him from a local pet store. I also thought about trying to find some decently priced real branches for my little dude but all I can find are super expensive.
If he’s from a pet store, then definitely take him to an experienced chameleon vet. It’s cheaper and quicker to find branches in the wild. Just make sure they aren’t rotten or infested, and prepare them properly before putting them in the cage
 

Gracetheace

New Member
If he’s from a pet store, then definitely take him to an experienced chameleon vet. It’s cheaper and quicker to find branches in the wild. Just make sure they aren’t rotten or infested, and prepare them properly before putting them in the cage
Okay. I also read that substrate was a no no in the enclosure so I don’t have any. Is that true? Should I have some? I’m looking into more plants and everything to get him more coverage.
 

ERKleRose

Chameleon Enthusiast
I did go through each leaf and cleaned it with a damp towel just Incase there were insects or poop or something on them. That’s about all I did. I covered the holes at the bottom of the pot with a little door like fixture I made, allowing for drainage when watered but covered Incase he decided to zap it with his tongue.
As long as the plant didn’t have pests on it and you scrubbed hard enough to take any pesticides off, that cleaning method works. Most people use dish soap diluted with water, hydrogen peroxide diluted with water, bleach diluted with water, Physan diluted with water, etc. Just make sure to thoroughly rinse off the plant multiple times if using those methods.
 

ERKleRose

Chameleon Enthusiast
Okay. I also read that substrate was a no no in the enclosure so I don’t have any. Is that true? Should I have some? I’m looking into more plants and everything to get him more coverage.
For you for now, no substrate whatsoever. Just plain bottom with a drainage solution. As you get more advanced and knowledgeable in your chameleon keeping, you can look into going bioactive.
 

Gracetheace

New Member
For you for now, no substrate whatsoever. Just plain bottom with a drainage solution. As you get more advanced and knowledgeable in your chameleon keeping, you can look into going bioactive.
Okay. Do you know good places/ websites to get some other kind of feeders? All I have available near me are crickets and mealworms
 

ERKleRose

Chameleon Enthusiast
Okay. Do you know good places/ websites to get some other kind of feeders? All I have available near me are crickets and mealworms
There are TONS, I’ll provide some links! I’m in Texas as well (Houston); some that are local to me but ship everywhere are Gulfcoast Silkworms and TC Insects. My other favorite is Rainbow Mealworms (they’re the cheapest). Dubia Roaches is cheap, too, but I alway get pest flies in my orders. For best roach varieties, Cape Cod Roaches and Roach Crossing have the biggest variety. Full Throttle Feeders used to sell lots of different roaches and unique feeders, but they don’t any more. Looking at other site sponsors and the chameleon classifieds chameleon food for sale forum on here are great, as well!

https://www.educationalscience.com/reptile-supplies
https://www.tcinsects.com/
https://www.rainbowmealworms.net/
https://dubiaroaches.com/
https://capecodroaches.com/
https://www.roachcrossing.com/
https://www.chameleonforums.com/sponsors/?tag=food
https://www.chameleonforums.com/forums/chameleon-food.82/
 

ERKleRose

Chameleon Enthusiast
As long as the plant didn’t have pests on it and you scrubbed hard enough to take any pesticides off, that cleaning method works. Most people use dish soap diluted with water, hydrogen peroxide diluted with water, bleach diluted with water, Physan diluted with water, etc. Just make sure to thoroughly rinse off the plant multiple times if using those methods.
People also steam clean their plants with a steam cleaner
 
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