Jackson Chameleon pair

Can I house a pair of Jackson's in a 30x18x36 I will have 2 basking spots 2 feeding bins and 2 plants for them
Thanks in advance
 

cswan19

New Member
From what I've heard chameleons shouldn't be housed together. Even if it seems like they are okay and not fighting it will stress them out and may cause problems.
 

ISA my Veiled

New Member
Honestly an awful idea, species like pygmies are most often held together just fine in from what I have heard female dominant groups but larger species are more solitary and prefer to get there space. Also having two in the cage regardless of what you put in can lead to bullying and stress by cutting the other off of food, and attacking. So overall just a bad idea because of the harm it can do to both chameleons. Good you asked though.
 

Lovereps

Avid Member
I'll add that Jackson's, although a fairly small species of chameleon, require a lot of room per animal--far more than anyone would guess.

I'm very glad you will be keeping them separately.
If you read through past posts of people who have kept Jackson's together, the story typically ends sadly with one of the chams becoming ill and dying because of the constant stress (which was not apparent by observing the chams). :(
In the wild, a chameleon can escape a stressful situation.

Here is a caresheet with good info on Jackson's chameleons:
https://www.chameleonforums.com/care/caresheets/jacksons/
Jackson's are a "montane" species, meaning that their native habitat is in the mountains.
They need cooler temps, higher humidity and about 1/2 the supplement dusting of Veiled and Panther chams.

If you read the forum caresheets, a single Jackson's should have a cage measuring at least 18"x18"x36" and, as rather shy chams, they require plenty of foliage to hide behind.
Your 2 plants would be good in one cage--and will help to maintain the high humidity levels that Jackson's need (70%-80%).
An automatic misting system makes it easier for you and better for the chams.

FWIW, I keep Jackson's individually in cages that are 24"x24"x48".
There are barriers between the cages so that they are not able to see any other chameleons.
Nothing fancy, just plastic sheets which totally prevent them from seeing their neighbors.
 

leedragon

Avid Member
actually what I know is that jacksonii can be housed togther but gravid females should alway be alone.

but it may be better to have they in separet cages
 

Miss Lily

Chameleon Enthusiast
I agree with keeping them separate, only introducing them if and when you want them to breed. I would think that being a species that require cooler temps, the idea of two basking spots would suggest to me that temps would make temps too hot for them. My adult male (he is still my baby boy lol) is in an 18 x 18 x 36" cage and all of it is well patrolled, althought he never ventures to the bottom, the rest is well utilised in his daily wanderings. :D
 

leedragon

Avid Member
I agree with keeping them separate, only introducing them if and when you want them to breed. I would think that being a species that require cooler temps, the idea of two basking spots would suggest to me that temps would make temps too hot for them. My adult male (he is still my baby boy lol) is in an 18 x 18 x 36" cage and all of it is well patrolled, althought he never ventures to the bottom, the rest is well utilised in his daily wanderings. :D
THAT´s exatly what I have been thinking about, what happens when you have several mountain species that require cooler temps but each one of those need a basking light, the room temperature will raise, how do peole soles this problems?

how does people keep temperaturs cool with several basking light in the same room
 

Blueberry2223

New Member
to be honest it all depends on your chameleons I have had my two Jacksons together for over a month and I have never had a problem with either but i have heard that some Jacksons will fight with each other so it all depends on your chameleons
 

Lovereps

Avid Member
to be honest it all depends on your chameleons I have had my two Jacksons together for over a month and I have never had a problem with either but i have heard that some Jacksons will fight with each other so it all depends on your chameleons
Blueberry2223, I don't know how you can state that after this thread of yours https://www.chameleonforums.com/help-me-please-107586/ , in which your chams are exhibiting abnormal behavior by sleeping during the day and where you were warned by a veterinarian that "If one cham is more dominant then that one will likely get more of the food and be in the basking position longer, which will mean the other won't be able to bask and thermoregulate like it needs and may not be getting enough food or water. The signs of cagemate aggression can be very subtle and easily missed. It doesn't sounds like much but that can be the difference between life and death over time. It is much more difficult to get a sick chameleon back to health than it is to prevent them from becoming sick. They need to be separated immediately before they slip away from you.""

Your chams are already showing signs of illness--which is sleeping during the day--and you've chosen to ignore the warnings.
No one here gets satisfaction of an "I told you so" when someone ignores sound advice and loses a cham or two.
It makes everyone sad, to be perfectly honest.

If you choose to ignore advice, that's your prerogative and no one can force you to do otherwise--- but advising others to make the same mistake you've been warned against doing is just unconscionable.

actually what I know is that jacksonii can be housed togther but gravid females should alway be alone.

but it may be better to have they in separet cages
Leedragon, the jacksonii that you are referring to, I suspect, are not the same subspecies that we have here in the USA. In the USA, we mostly have Jackson's xantholophus--which are the largest of the Jackson's, whereas in Europe, you typically have Jackson's jacksonii and Jackson's merumontanus, instead---both much smaller subspecies.
If these smaller chams are being housed together, it would certainly not be in an enclosure that normally is recommended for a single chameleon but in a far larger enclosure, several times the size for a single cham-- where there is ample room to escape the other and multiple basking areas.
It would also be a venture only for an advanced chamkeeper, wouldn't it?
 
Last edited:

OldChamKeeper

Chameleon Enthusiast
THAT´s exatly what I have been thinking about, what happens when you have several mountain species that require cooler temps but each one of those need a basking light, the room temperature will raise, how do peole soles this problems?

how does people keep temperaturs cool with several basking light in the same room
One thing many keepers forget about species that like it cooler is that they still go thru periods during the year in their native habitats where temps will be somewhat higher than "cool".

I have a herp room. Sometimes the temps get around 88F. However humidity and air flow are maintained. While I do own a number of Mnt Meru Jackson's which is a species considered to liking it "cool" I've observed them a number of times get their surface temps to around 90F ( I own a Cooper temp gun hence being able to check herp skin temps).

There is a lot more to keeping a herp comfortable than using a cookie cutter thought process. Looking at yearly temps and rainfall in addition to other factors from their home country/region allow for an understanding of their ranges and needs.

Concerning housing them together. I've witnessed what happens when they can see each other, doesn't matter if they are in the same cage or across the room, every species I've kept they like to be solo. Some were actively aggressive, others "looked" like they tolerated each other but you could see signs of stress if you looked for them. As a matter of routine I keep all chams solo unless breeding is in order and my females always did better as a result.

Chams, unlike many animals, do better alone.
 

leedragon

Avid Member
Blueberry2223, I don't know how you can state that after this thread of yours https://www.chameleonforums.com/help-me-please-107586/ , in which your chams are exhibiting abnormal behavior by sleeping during the day and where you were warned by a veterinarian that "If one cham is more dominant then that one will likely get more of the food and be in the basking position longer, which will mean the other won't be able to bask and thermoregulate like it needs and may not be getting enough food or water. The signs of cagemate aggression can be very subtle and easily missed. It doesn't sounds like much but that can be the difference between life and death over time. It is much more difficult to get a sick chameleon back to health than it is to prevent them from becoming sick. They need to be separated immediately before they slip away from you.""

Your chams are already showing signs of illness--which is sleeping during the day--and you've chosen to ignore the warnings.
No one here gets satisfaction of an "I told you so" when someone ignores sound advice and loses a cham or two.
It makes everyone sad, to be perfectly honest.

If you choose to ignore advice, that's your prerogative and no one can force you to do otherwise--- but advising others to make the same mistake you've been warned against doing is just unconscionable.



Leedragon, the jacksonii that you are referring to, I suspect, are not the same subspecies that we have here in the USA. In the USA, we mostly have Jackson's xantholophus--which are the largest of the Jackson's, whereas in Europe, you typically have Jackson's jacksonii and Jackson's merumontanus, instead---both much smaller subspecies.
If these smaller chams are being housed together, it would certainly not be in an enclosure that normally is recommended for a single chameleon but in a far larger enclosure, several times the size for a single cham-- where there is ample room to escape the other and multiple basking areas.
It would also be a venture only for an advanced chamkeeper, wouldn't it?
well yes you probably are right, I was talking about jacksonii jacksonii, a friend of me use to housed 1.2 jacksonii jacksonii and keep the gravid females alone. but it may be possible to keep xanthos the same way if the cage is big enough, but yes it may be better to stick to one per cage
 

leedragon

Avid Member
One thing many keepers forget about species that like it cooler is that they still go thru periods during the year in their native habitats where temps will be somewhat higher than "cool".

I have a herp room. Sometimes the temps get around 88F. However humidity and air flow are maintained. While I do own a number of Mnt Meru Jackson's which is a species considered to liking it "cool" I've observed them a number of times get their surface temps to around 90F ( I own a Cooper temp gun hence being able to check herp skin temps).

There is a lot more to keeping a herp comfortable than using a cookie cutter thought process. Looking at yearly temps and rainfall in addition to other factors from their home country/region allow for an understanding of their ranges and needs.

Concerning housing them together. I've witnessed what happens when they can see each other, doesn't matter if they are in the same cage or across the room, every species I've kept they like to be solo. Some were actively aggressive, others "looked" like they tolerated each other but you could see signs of stress if you looked for them. As a matter of routine I keep all chams solo unless breeding is in order and my females always did better as a result.

Chams, unlike many animals, do better alone.
yes man, but the still need cool, maybe no year around but you know a couple of months, how do you keep the room temperature cool if you have many basking light or other thing that warm up the reptil room?
 

Carlton

Chameleon Enthusiast
Based solely on the OP's cage size it would be too small regardless which species it was. A single jax OK. You could always build a large cage frame and divide it into 2 halves but share some of the lights, misting or fogging systems.
 

Carlton

Chameleon Enthusiast
to be honest it all depends on your chameleons I have had my two Jacksons together for over a month and I have never had a problem with either but i have heard that some Jacksons will fight with each other so it all depends on your chameleons
A month isn't very long at all. Risky idea regardless of their personalities. Signs of "conflict" can be very subtle but constant...usually nothing as obvious as physical fighting...and neither can get away from the other if it feels threatened. Jax tend to show their stress by retreating and hiding to shut out the world, not fighting. Eventually one or both will crash. Separate them.
 

OldChamKeeper

Chameleon Enthusiast
If you are using multiple basking lights and still want to give them some cooler temps one solution is to have the basking lights on a timer and only have them come on for a brief time, say 8am to 10am. However using this method requires you paying close attn to your chams and making sure they are getting what they need.
 

djfishygillz

Established Member
Why are people so dang stubborn about housing them together! Just separate them! lol

Excuse my tone but come on, just keep them alone. It can only have negative or neutral effects on the chameleons. There is never a positive to being housed together! Just separate them, it is that simple.

If you want animals that need attention and to be housed together get sugar gliders, or prairie dogs. Not chameleons, they do best when alone.
 

jfw60

New Member
actually what I know is that jacksonii can be housed togther but gravid females should alway be alone.

but it may be better to have they in separet cages
Yes absolutely. This couple has been together for a year with no trouble.
 
Top Bottom