How to breed locusts?

Calypratus

Established Member
Though I do not own a chameleon anymore I would love to know how to breed locusts. I'm an avid bug collector/breeder and I would love to have a locust colony! Sorry this is kind of off topic.
 

Calypratus

Established Member
I’m not sure but I’ll check what species we have locally. From what I know they are definitely not the swarming type
 

Calypratus

Established Member
It died this morning, but I can probably find another soon since it’s finally staring to get warm in NC
 

Brodybreaux25

Chameleon Enthusiast
Only asking because I wasn’t able to identify the ones I was catching as easily as I thought i could due to all the instar stages. May not be a problem for you...
 

Andee

Chameleon Enthusiast
The problem is if it's not a swarming locust it will be considered a grasshopper if I am correct. Grasshoppers are much more complicated to breed than swarming locusts though it's possible. I've done it before.
 

Bigsky

Established Member
Though I do not own a chameleon anymore I would love to know how to breed locusts. I'm an avid bug collector/breeder and I would love to have a locust colony! Sorry this is kind of off topic.
I assume you are talking about grasshoppers. In temperate regions, they have obligatory diapause, so there is only one generation per year.
When nymphs are crowded, they develop extra large wings, a migratory phase when they are adults.
The seventeen year locusts underground as nymphs and adjults appear at 17 year intervals. They are entirely different than grasshoppers.
 

Andee

Chameleon Enthusiast
They are species of locusts/swarming grasshoppers that do not require diapause
 

SauceGandhi

Established Member
I assume you are talking about grasshoppers. In temperate regions, they have obligatory diapause, so there is only one generation per year.
When nymphs are crowded, they develop extra large wings, a migratory phase when they are adults.
The seventeen year locusts underground as nymphs and adjults appear at 17 year intervals. They are entirely different than grasshoppers.
You're thinking of cicadas. Locusts are just grasshoppers with a gregarious swarming phase. Schistocerca gregaria, Locusta migratoria, etc.
 

SauceGandhi

Established Member
If you have any pictures of the grasshopper species you're talking about then I can help you. There are many species of grasshoppers in the US that are easy to breed. None of these guys pictured below had a diapause. All eggs hatched in 4 weeks or less.

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Rst_Cham

Chameleon Enthusiast
I'm interested in this as well. Did you find info online or how did you figure out how to do it?
 

Longhorn1234

Established Member
I remembered reading about a guy who was breeding differential grasshoppers and he was able to reduce the diapause time after every generation. Could be worth a try if you have a specie that needs a diapause
 
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