how many veiled eggs can fit in a hova-bator?

Fate X

New Member
how many veiled eggs can you put in a bova-bator?

i have read of setting the temp between 75- 80 f .

do i leave the eggs in the trays with perlite and put them trays in the incubator?

should i add water to the incubator tray like it says to do?

it took me a few hrs to get the temp to stay at 80 f. i was thinking maybe 78 would be better.
are eggs that re-absorb water and swell up good?
 
I can't help you with use on it, however, I beleive the majority of people breeding do not use hovabators- or regular brand name incubators at all. Its been suggested that Chameleon eggs profit from having a day night temperature variance instead of a cnostant heat that commercial incubators give.
 
Will Hayward said:
I can't help you with use on it, however, I beleive the majority of people breeding do not use hovabators- or regular brand name incubators at all. Its been suggested that Chameleon eggs profit from having a day night temperature variance instead of a cnostant heat that commercial incubators give.
Will, you are right. A lot of breeders use only shoe boxes with lids for incubating, they put pearlite in the bottom and then after everything is inside the box, they put it in a warm closet.
 
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Fate X

New Member
i was thinking of putting a timer on the incubator so it shuts off at night, i had to get the hovabator cause i need something to insulate the eggs from any possible drafts etc.

i have seen on the internet people using these hova bators for veileds.
 
Fate X said:
i was thinking of putting a timer on the incubator so it shuts off at night, i had to get the hovabator cause i need something to insulate the eggs from any possible drafts etc.

i have seen on the internet people using these hova bators for veileds.
I just put them on shelves in a closet. It backs onto an exterior house wall and the tempertaure works fine with day night fluctuations.

I know people that use desk drawers.
 

Fate X

New Member
veiled eggs can incubate at 70 f at night ? i thought 70 was to cold, so then i could just put the eggs in the hova bator without turning it on?
 
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Tempurature will dictate time. I highly suggest reading some articles on methods of incubation. It is a very indepth process and you need to decide which way you should do it. With a diapause, without a diapause, your temperatures, day night varience.

Before you even decide all of this, you need to figure out what you are going to do with so many oh so hungry mouths to feed. how are you going to keep them all, or how are you going to find GOOD homes for them.

Here are two articles you should read, although I reccomend gathering info from multiple sources and making your own discision.

Incubation Strategies by Francois Le Berre
Eggs: Laying to Hatching by Bill Strand
 
Mine were incubated in my closet. They were pretty cool, in the high 60's to mid 70's. Takes longer to hatch - around 8 months.

This last clutch is being incubated a little warmer (since they were laind in the late winter) in the same closet, low 70's to low 80's. I expect them to hatch at the 6.5-7 month mark.

If you incubate them at a constant 80something, it will take around 5.5-6 months, but they will be smaller on average than those incubated a bit cooler.

If your room temp is in the 70's, don't bother wiht an incubator. the chances of it overheating the eggs is much higher than anything going wrong with room-temp incubation.
 
Eric Adrignola said:
If you incubate them at a constant 80something, it will take around 5.5-6 months, but they will be smaller on average than those incubated a bit cooler.
I dissagree, if taken from the laying site and put right into mid 80, there is a good possibility that it could take up to a year. The eggs benefit from a cool period before the increse in temperature and humidity.

Jerm, (a User here) has sucessfully hatched pardalis eggs in 5 months by putting them through a high 60 diapause for one month befor increasing the temperature and moistness to the 80s for another 4 months.

Without diapause, development is prolonged. I have eggs that were laid 3.5 months after another clutch, that I expect to hatch out of order because I did not change the temperature after the first while.
 
Are youtalking about veiled eggs?

A local breeder I know incubates their eggs at a constant 86 degrees (When I said 80 something, I was actually talking about high 80's). Their eggs take less than 6 months most of the time, but they are tiny tiny babies.

I should admit I am not a fan of this breeder practices.

I've never bothered with a diapause for veileds - I'm not even sure if they get one in the wild. Most of my eggs were incubated from the mid 70's to the mid 80's. None took longer than 7 months, except the last clutch, and they were much cooler than "normal" for my veileds.

I know with panthers, a slight temp mess-up can result in eggs taking more than two years ot hatch. gotta get the diapause just right.
 

Fate X

New Member
i plan on these veileds hatching in 5-6 months as for feeding them all , im gonna have a large scale pinhead crickets breeding operation going on,im gonna have enough pins to overfeed them if i wanted to.
there gonna be going to some local petstores and the others will be sold via internet etc. i know someone who can sell some of them also.
right now the issue is getting healthy baby veileds after they hatch and are eating and get healthy then i can be more concerned about selling them , like i said as for food thats no problem.

that was a intresting article incubating stratigies, thing is now im stuck with a hovabator i might not need.
 
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i hatched veiled eggs in a incubator with the high of 84. the reason i used the incubator was becuase they were laid in late november and my house dropped to bellow 50 at night the eggs hatched in may. if i every get a clutch during the summer i don't plan to use an incubator on them
 

Fate X

New Member
what i did was i put the eggs in the incubator because i set the temp to 79 f the temp in the room where they are changes , its airconditioned so it gets cold,if i put them somewhere else its gonna get to hot, the second floor goes to 85-90 easy on a hot day. basically the incubator is not on much its more a convenient ,safe place to keep them and will protect them from drafts etc from the A.C. and the cold of the winter. my house is cold during the winter except for the chameleons room which is probably where the incubator will be moved to . the chameleon room will be about 75 f to 80 f in the winter.
 
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