Gular edema

erik775

Established Member
What the heck...my sambava has gular edema and it won't go away no mater what i doo???stoped supplementing for a while nothing uped his misting nothing and gave him more outside time nothing...now i noticed my nosy be is getting it:mad::mad::mad::(:(:(i don't know what the heck I'm doing wrong...i mist my nosy be 3 times a day and when i do i make sure his cage is pretty soaked and i supplement him regularly...what in the word am i doing wrong????:confused::confused::confused:this sucks!!!
Oh yeah and my nosy be has lived by an open window since I've had him so he kinda has two Sources of uvb...
I feel so dumb ...i feel like i can't keep the gular edema from coming..like i don't know how to do things right..should i mist more???i just got a mist king for my sambava with gular edema and my female(no gular edema)but my nosy be is in our room and the other two chams are in the livingroom...

I need some help man...:(:(:(
I just noticed it on my nosy be and i want to stop it before it getts bad like my sambava...my sambava looks like he has some big boobs...:eek::(:eek:
 
Last edited:

carol5208

Chameleon Enthusiast
Honestly, I don't think you can get rid of it. I am not sure why both of your chameleons have gotten it. I have a cham that I took in from another forum member. He has gular edema also and he came to me with it 17 months ago and I have never really conquered it. There are days when it is better and less noticeable than others. I have tried everything and the supplementing thing...well there is some suspect that it is caused by over supplementation but the guy I got him from really did not supplement him at all, so that kinda throws that theory out the window. My chameleon has it for atleast 3 years from the time I have owned him and the previous owner stated he had it about 1 1/2 yrs prior to that. It is not deadly as he would have been gone years ago if that were the case. I wish I could give you some advice and there was a way to figure out what really causes it.
 

erik775

Established Member
Honestly, I don't think you can get rid of it. I am not sure why both of your chameleons have gotten it. I have a cham that I took in from another forum member. He has gular edema also and he came to me with it 17 months ago and I have never really conquered it. There are days when it is better and less noticeable than others. I have tried everything and the supplementing thing...well there is some suspect that it is caused by over supplementation but the guy I got him from really did not supplement him at all, so that kinda throws that theory out the window. My chameleon has it for atleast 3 years from the time I have owned him and the previous owner stated he had it about 1 1/2 yrs prior to that. It is not deadly as he would have been gone years ago if that were the case. I wish I could give you some advice and there was a way to figure out what really causes it.

Dang..that sucks ive been trying on my sambava and yeah it doesn't go away...i hope it goes away on my nosybe...
 

pigglett79

Avid Member
My sambava also has it. I too cannot determine the cause. I have tried many things and it doesn't go away. Like carol said it is fluctuates in severity, but doesn't go away completely. The good thing is that he doesn't seem to notice that he sometimes has moobs, and it hasn't effected his self esteem ;)
 

Saldarya

Established Member
As others have mentioned, my Female Panther has it and again, it fluctuates with severity. To the question of whether or not various supplementation issue may cause it, I think there is some merit to that as in my case I believe I can point to something specific at the time I was dosing that in retrospect was likely unnecessary and possibly caused it. That being said, making the change after the fact doesn't seem to cause it to improve.

For what its worth, the major change I made in my keeping was to pay close attention to my gutload to ensure that it included items that contained the necessary supplements and reply upon that as a method to provide the chams the proper supplementation rather than rely strictly upon the specific dry supplements. This along with a VERY varied choice in feeders I believe has made a dramatic, and a positive, impact on all of the animals to include limiting this potential issue.

I know it is frustrating, especially when you evaluate your care procedures and feel that they are solid. But move forward with the learning and dont be afraid to deviate from the standard supplementation schedule that is always posted and rather adjust to your specific animals needs.

Bobby
 

ferretinmyshoes

Veterinarian
Staff member
My panther's went away completely after about a year of fluctuating. It's been gone for almost two years now. But two of my others still fluctuate with it intermittently...
 

ataraxia

Avid Member
Never stop supplementing completely. Plain calcium/UVB may help.

Regulate feeder intake. Not allowing the animal to become obese.
Gut load with a variety of ingredients and choose ingredients low in oxalate and no animal protein.
Be careful with supplements with preformed vitamins.
Good hydration.

Edit: If you smoke. Place the enclosure somewhere where he wont be subjected to it.
 
Last edited:
Top Bottom