Guidance please

I am so sorry about your situation, this is going to sound morbid but is he stiff? If he has passed I would think rigor mortis has set in by now. If the lights are on I would think he would have responded by now.
Seems likely. Pretty sure he passed to the other side. Very confusing situation. My only postulate is that being young the stress of transport overloaded his system. Idk that really makes sense but it's all I got. Some strange anomaly
 

GrayMadder

Chameleon Enthusiast
Yea, it seems like it was a freak accident. Have you talked to the breeder about it? Are they still saying he just needs to warm up?

So strange all the bugs died as well.

I'm sorry for your loss. ☹
 
Yea, it seems like it was a freak accident. Have you talked to the breeder about it? Are they still saying he just needs to warm up?

So strange all the bugs died as well.

I'm sorry for your loss. ☹
I've been in contact with them throughout whole thing. Put him up near his basking spot for awhile incase he was just cold but to no avail.

I don't see how he could have been that cold anyway. Not like it was cold in house was in upper 60s. Never once was he exposed to anything below 65 except walking 15ft from car to house
 

Beman

Chameleon Enthusiast
The baby looks incredibly small. Have you tried taking him out and letting him warm up in your hands? Is baby gripping at all... Are the eyes sunk in?

Per the dubia and silks. They are either way too cold or dead. dubia especially do not like being cold. They like it 80-85 degrees.

But were those dubia to feed the baby? Because your baby looks far too small for them.
 

Mendez

Avid Member
I doubt the dubias are too cold to move, I constantly cool my room down to 55 degrees or below during winter nights and they do just fine--of course, they do slow down when it comes to diet.

Like @Beman said, the only way to know for sure if he is dead is to warm him up. Place him near the basking light and let him warm up--be careful to not overheat him. 80 degrees at the basking is perfect. If he still hasn't moved, then he is dead. He looks dead, but it is also kind of hard to tell. It is worth giving him a second chance.

And you didn't do anything wrong at all. The stress of the transport wouldn't have done this, especially to the bugs. But even little chams should be fine. Chameleons tend to take transportation pretty well--all things considered. It is definitely something on the breeder's end (most likely unintentional). Where did the transaction take place? In his garage? Could it be pesticides--like if the pesticide guy came by and sprayed the place down when no one was around? Anyways, if the guy is willing to replace the cham, I would give him a second chance--seems like all of this is a freak accident. I don't think anyone has heard of this before.
 

Mendez

Avid Member
I've been in contact with them throughout whole thing. Put him up near his basking spot for awhile incase he was just cold but to no avail.
Oh, nevermind, I see you already tried warming him up. If he hasn't moved his eyes around then he is dead. He should be acting the way that you saw him when he was climbing on the plant at the breeders house--at leat moving his eyes around. Chameleons do not stay perfectly still. This is not normal.
I don't see how he could have been that cold anyway. Not like it was cold in house was in upper 60s. Never once was he exposed to anything below 65 except walking 15ft from car to house
Out of curiosity, how cold does it get where you live? And was he in a box? Unless it was colder than freezing, like you, I don;t see how this could pose a problem--since it takes time for internal temps to drop. And if he was in a box--there really is no way that this could have been an issue--even at freezing temps.
 

Fraservet

New Member
For the bugs to have all died as well, without really cold temperatures for some time, it really seems likely they were all exposed to some sort of toxin. They can be much more sensitive than people to chemicals - might be worth checking your car out to make sure it’s not giving off fumes of some kind that could be getting into the interior? If they were like that immediately when you got home that would be a possibility - I assume you didn’t have any symptoms, headaches etc.?
 
I’m so sorry that’s not nice at all I would say it’s on the breeders side of things and not your fault in the slightest so don’t be put off in trying again. Will the breeder give you another? Compensate in anyway? Seems bad if they don’t in some sort of way..sorry for your loss
 

Beman

Chameleon Enthusiast
I've been in contact with them throughout whole thing. Put him up near his basking spot for awhile incase he was just cold but to no avail.

I don't see how he could have been that cold anyway. Not like it was cold in house was in upper 60s. Never once was he exposed to anything below 65 except walking 15ft from car to house
What was the temp between the car to the house? How long was the baby in this temp?
 

Vinesar21

Established Member
Weird question, are you a smoker, were you smoking in the car? Something somewhere happened. Dubias are one of the hardier bugs, they dont just die. Also you should've taken the baby out of the container soon as you got home, i don't think it was a good idea to keep him in.
 

jamest0o0

Chameleon Enthusiast
Just read this, had to be fumes or smoke if the temp never dropped for extended periods of time. It seems weird the breeder said they were asleep, my chams always woke up relatively easily, a breeder should know this.

Did you clean your car with anything, where were they sitting in the car(floor?), maybe something to do with fumes of some sort settling down in the cups where there isn't much ventilation.
 
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