Grasshoppers

Chamel619

Established Member
Thank you for your replies ,

I would typically agree with the statements above. Most packaged bugs are freeze dried and have very low nutritional value as well as being difficult to digest.

My curiosity about this particular product is the way the hoppers are processed.

I currently breed super worms, dubia and hissers and have many resources for my crickets, wax and silk worms, but this years goal is to add a diurnal insect to the menu.

I’ve ordered a package for closer inspection.

If anyone in SoCal has a alternative to achieve this goal, you’re in courage to post
 
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GoodKarma19

Chameleon Enthusiast
I've actually recieved "Eco-Bug" samples in shipments before - mealworms, super worms, and bsfl. I didn't feed them to my chams, but my starling sure liked them! It has a high moisture content, a far cry from freeze dried offerings. Reminds me of a better processed version of the "Can O (blank)" products. Can't see it being much good for anything beyond a handfed treat, though, given the general need for movement to entice a chameleon's prey drive.

Interested to hear of your findings!
 

Chamel619

Established Member
I've actually recieved "Eco-Bug" samples in shipments before - mealworms, super worms, and bsfl. I didn't feed them to my chams, but my starling sure liked them! It has a high moisture content, a far cry from freeze dried offerings. Reminds me of a better processed version of the "Can O (blank)" products. Can't see it being much good for anything beyond a handfed treat, though, given the general need for movement to entice a chameleon's prey drive.

Interested to hear of your findings!

Thank you, this is the exact type of feedback I’m looking for.

I would not attempt to make these a staple, but do exactly as you said “A hand fed treat” on a non-feeding day.

I’ll have a better idea of what I’m willing to do after I’ve examined the hoppers internal organs under the microscope.

Im not yet giving up on finding a source of live hoppers. Just questioning options.
 

snitz427

Chameleon Enthusiast
Live grasshoppers aren’t a commonly sold feeder in the us because up until this year, most species were tightly regulated. 2 have come off the list so I would expect to see differential grasshoppers occasionally for sale. There are, of course, some people who are willing to risk shipping other species but you’ll have a difficult time finding it advertised.

If you have native hoppers I’d recommend catching some! Let them breed and separate the babies, which can then breed without being separated. If you live out in the woods or very rural area that is free of pesticides, you can feed and breed the wild caught directly. There is always a chance of parasites, but further from urban areas the better. @Brodybreaux25 does this down in Louisiana wilderness.
 

Chamel619

Established Member
So, Amazon delivered the grasshoppers - I feel this is an omen to abandon the idea. :cautious:

Again, thank you all for your input. I will continue to search for a obtainable diurnal insect.

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Brodybreaux25

Chameleon Enthusiast
“Wilderness” lol

Yes, I do feed a nearly 100% wild caught diet from early spring to fall. But since I’m so far south that means about 9-10 months out of the year lol. It has risks, have to be vigilant and ready to act when and if some types south.

.... unfortunately your not going to find anyone to cross state lines with them.
 

snitz427

Chameleon Enthusiast
“Wilderness” lol

Yes, I do feed a nearly 100% wild caught diet from early spring to fall. But since I’m so far south that means about 9-10 months out of the year lol. It has risks, have to be vigilant and ready to act when and if some types south.

.... unfortunately your not going to find anyone to cross state lines with them.

Hey I was trying to be polite. My family owns land (swamp) in LA. Its about as far removed from Baltimore’s concrete jungle as it gets!

There are some people who sell various species by mail... but ya gotta know someone. I think this summer you’ll be able to find differential, and I think it was either red legged or two striped that were “deregulated.” Red legged are kinda small IME, though.
 

Motherlode Chameleon

Chameleon Enthusiast
Live grasshoppers aren’t a commonly sold feeder in the us because up until this year, most species were tightly regulated. 2 have come off the list so I would expect to see differential grasshoppers occasionally for sale. There are, of course, some people who are willing to risk shipping other species but you’ll have a difficult time finding it advertised.

If you have native hoppers I’d recommend catching some! Let them breed and separate the babies, which can then breed without being separated. If you live out in the woods or very rural area that is free of pesticides, you can feed and breed the wild caught directly. There is always a chance of parasites, but further from urban areas the better. @Brodybreaux25 does this down in Louisiana wilderness.

Where have you seen that two species have come off the list? I just looked at the USDA Agriculture site and they have three Melanoplus species posted. The same three Melanoplus species that the USDA started with to begin with.

Best Regards
Jeremy A. Rich
 

snitz427

Chameleon Enthusiast
Where have you seen that two species have come off the list? I just looked at the USDA Agriculture site and they have three Melanoplus species posted. The same three Melanoplus species that the USDA started with to begin with.

Best Regards
Jeremy A. Rich

Perhaps they were there all along. Im going off a post from October announcing their addition, and per the aphis site it says de-regulated beginning 8/2019... my interpretation of that wording is that they were regulated prior to 8/2019. If not, I might suggest they change it to “updated as of,” instead of beginning.

I’m not sure why the misconception has been that they’ve been regulated all along, but that is certainly the message I’ve received elsewhere.

https://www.chameleonforums.com/threads/grasshoppers.171678/#post-1520697

https://www.aphis.usda.gov/aphis/ou...its/plant-pests/330-web-lists/plant-pest-list
 

Motherlode Chameleon

Chameleon Enthusiast
Perhaps they were there all along. Im going off a post from October announcing their addition, and per the aphis site it says de-regulated beginning 8/2019... my interpretation of that wording is that they were regulated prior to 8/2019. If not, I might suggest they change it to “updated as of,” instead of beginning.

I’m not sure why the misconception has been that they’ve been regulated all along, but that is certainly the message I’ve received elsewhere.

https://www.chameleonforums.com/threads/grasshoppers.171678/#post-1520697

https://www.aphis.usda.gov/aphis/ou...its/plant-pests/330-web-lists/plant-pest-list

I think the regulations were that they were strictly not allowed to be shipped in state and across state lines. That is with the exception of me (for now) as I had permits to move two species of Schistocerca through the state of California. The new species are allowed to be shipped in state and federally and I think that is the same status since those species were made legal.

Best Regards
Jeremy A. Rich
 

snitz427

Chameleon Enthusiast
I think the regulations were that they were strictly not allowed to be shipped in state and across state lines. That is with the exception of me (for now) as I had permits to move two species of Schistocerca through the state of California. The new species are allowed to be shipped in state and federally and I think that is the same status since those species were made legal.

Best Regards
Jeremy A. Rich

Yes, that’s what I meant by regulated. Unable to be shipped/cross state lines without permits. It is odd that some of the regulated species are migratory and native to much of North America. I don’t know enough about the subject to speculate, but I will happily take the differential and katydids! :)
 
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