Good, good, good, good vibrations...

kinyonga

Chameleon Enthusiast
https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2014/dec/04/scientists-plan-search-the-worlds-rarest-chameleon
"Chapman’s pygmy chameleon also is known to produce a low frequency sound vibration, which is perceived as a ‘buzzing’ and is transmitted through the twigs and other substrates they sit on. These vibrations are used as a means of communicating with each other, particularly during courtship and territorial displays, and possibly also for startling predators.”

Veiled chameleons...
https://www.jstor.org/stable/1447408?seq=1#page_scan_tab_contents
https://web.archive.org/web/20080418003008/http://www.geocities.com/RainForest/Vines/5014/hoot.html
http://www.biosci.missouri.edu/cocroft/Publications/RBC pubs/1999 Cocroft Copeia.pdf



https://web.archive.org/web/20051119090127/http://www.adcham.com/html/taxonomy/species/chcalyptratus.html
Other species have been known to do it too...
B. decaryi (E. Edwards)
B. thieli (E. Edwards; L. Horgan)
C. dilepis (K. Barnett)
C. Johnstoni (F. LeBerre)
C. melleri (A. Banks)
C. Oweni (F. LeBerre)
C. senegalensis (K. Barnett)
F. ousteleti (multiple ADCHAM list members)
F. pardalis (multiple ADCHAM list members)
R. brachyurus (J. Mease)
R. brevicaudatus (J. Mease)
R. kerstenii robecchii (E. Edwards; J. Mease)
R. uluguruensis (J. Mease)
 
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