females first eggs ?

Brad

Administrator
Staff member
Fate X,

I don't have much experience with female chameleons and eggs, but from readings I believe a female veiled can become sexually mature in 5-6 months. I assume eggs could soon follow. Again, I don't really have enough experience in this area to be offering advice.
 
Veiled Chameleon.


Also, thats not to say that you SHOULD be mating them at that age, in the wild that is what age they could when they are receptive, or raped. However, being captive bred, it's often the case that females that young cannot handle being pregnant, because they have grown weak from a cooshy captive lifestyle. In the wild, only the srong, smart & lucky survive.
 

Fate X

New Member
i'm not gonna breed them that young,but they seem very strong and i mean strong their hands are like clamps n they are much stronger then i thought they would be at their age.
i see almost no weakness at all in them .
 
Also, thats not to say that you SHOULD be mating them at that age, in the wild that is what age they could when they are receptive, or raped. However, being captive bred, it's often the case that females that young cannot handle being pregnant, because they have grown weak from a cooshy captive lifestyle. In the wild, only the srong, smart & lucky survive.
Weak...

Well, for one instance, possibly a weak immune system. Since CBB chameleons grow up in (usually) a clean, low-stress, no short of food, no territory to defend, no males to ward off, etc... Basically nothing that would build character, require a need of faster physical growth, or increase in instinctive determination and will to survive.

Just some ideas for the sake of conversation. That and, Im sure many females die in the wild from matings too early. However since only a few out of many die, and chameleon keepers have only a few to begin with, why add risks for impatience for receiving offspring.
 

IvorySerpent

New Member
Veiled Eggs

Hi,

I am currently the proud Hu-Mama of a clutch of 46 good Veiled eggs.....so far....Pantera is double-clutching on me!! Through research my Hubby & I have done, the Veiled can start laying at the age of 5 months, but we decided to wait until Pantera was at least a year old to start her off. She was actually in an enclosure with two juvie males when wh got her, along with one of the males she was kept with. We did alot of research on breeding since we had a Veiled before but it was a Big male and he was celibate. We stressed over all the horror stories we read, but luckily Pantera is an exceedingly healthy girl and didn't have the dehydration issues or egg-bound problems we came to fear for. She's currently baking her second clutch and again looks to have swallowed marbles. Doesn't look as "full" as the first go-round.......THANK GOODNESS!!
Good luck with your girl!!


IvorySerpent

Jessica Ivory
 

Chris Anderson

Dr. House of Chameleons
Staff member
Will,

Just as a side comment, while continuity of common names would be nice, they are all unofficial, vary widely and essentially, none are incorrect. If we wanted to get really technical and only use the most commonly used common name, we should be calling them Yemen Chameleons. For clarity's sake, it would be stupid of me to use a common name that others were not familiar with. That doesn't make me wrong but it inhibits my ability to communicate with others about them. By the same logic, its equally stupid of me to use the common name in the first place. I doubt many would absolutely know off the top of their head that another common name for Ch. calyptratus is the Cone-headed Chameleon or that Ch. cristatus is also called the fringed chameleon. My point is, you can call a chameleon anything you want for a common name as long as people know what you're talking about and you aren't wrong for doing so. You may loose people along the way but that is the fundemental issue with common names in the first place. Just my 2 cents.

Chris
 
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