Euthanizing....

DocZ

Member
Had to get some sleep last night, so I'm catching up this morning. First off, I was definitely not worked up. I do apologize if it seemed that way, or if I said something that caused any hurt feelings. Like you said text is not the best way communicate. I find all of this very interesting. So glad to see Veterinary professionals jump into the discussion. I actually had located and was reading some of the euthanasia guidelines before I went to bed, great bedtime reading :)

I do understand your concern for the animal's stress during transport. I've only had my chameleon for a short time, but he definitely doesn't like me or being bothered and would not appreciate a vet visit at all. And depending on the underlying issue that necessitates euthanasia, the animal may experience a large amount of additional stress. I think for most people they would not be able to crush their animals head to euthanize it and the best approach is a professional euthanasia. If you're not able to humanely euthanize the animal yourself, it is best for your animal that you take them to someone that can humanely perform the procedure. As a side note, I'm a huge proponent of house visits for my pets. I've been fortunate to have a Veterinarian in our area that will come to your home for check ups and has also came to our home to euthanize animals when needed. So much easier to deal with.

Thanks for the interesting discussions!
 

Beman

Chameleon Enthusiast
Some creatures(many inverts for example) can have the most peaceful death by being frozen. What makes you think vets euthanasia is anything special outside of what a regular person is capable of(a bullet would end suffering pretty damn quick and you don't have to drag a dying animal to a strange place)? You seem to be thinking of this as if everything is human and feels things the way we do. Let's leave the emotions out of this. I'm not arguing that we should freeze our chameleons... i'm pointing out that for some creatures it is a reasonable thing to do. If this was back in the 90's like mentioned, I can see why they may have thought it was painless.
Okay I could word this better... a vet does have better methods of euthanizing for the vast majority, but depending on the animal and the circumstances, there are other possibilities. For a chameleon, just to take them to a vet is an extremely stressful experience. So the animal is being traumatized and dying, great! So much love In that. Maybe we should be talking about humane methods that can be done at home if possible?
I am saying that it is my choice to provide a peaceful death with the assistance of a Veterinarian. I believe that is what I sign up for when I get an animal. To not only provide a loving home, with a great life, and vet care whatever the animal may need. But to also provide end of life care.

I just took my puppy in for her last shot. I go monthly to get her heartguard and nextguard meds to keep her heartworm and flea and tick free. I take her for her annual shots. I buy her healthy food. She has toys, and a special harness so she does not damage her trachea when she pulls. When she is old and it is her time if she is suffering then I will take her to my vet.

Shoot her with a gun, freeze her, or hit her over her head. That is barbaric to me. So you kill yours the way you want to and I will choose my Veterinarian whom I trust when that is the only option left. For me I do not feel that anything else is a "reasonable" thing to do.

And I am tired of it being about me pulling human emotions into it James. I stated my opinion and all the sudden I am an "emotional" person. That is really really annoying.
 

nightanole

Chameleon Enthusiast
Reptiles that freeze during the winter, do not develop ice "crystals". Under a microscope all the ice is smooth, so it doesnt puncture/damage the cells. I assume this does not have pain.

However having your limbs/cells slowly destroyed by ice crystals sounds horrible.

As for me, i think of it a bit differently. For most of us a vet visit can take days to sched. For those times, i just completely destroy the head with a 45lb mallet on a cinderblock. There is no "live brain for minutes", its pulverised. I feel this is more humane than waiting hours or days.

But i much prefer the scheduled method with the vet if you just "know" its there time.
 

ferretinmyshoes

Veterinarian
Staff member
Reptiles that freeze during the winter, do not develop ice "crystals". Under a microscope all the ice is smooth, so it doesnt puncture/damage the cells. I assume this does not have pain.

However having your limbs/cells slowly destroyed by ice crystals sounds horrible.
Yes the difference is that reptiles that hibernate in freezing conditions have adaptations that prevent actually total freezing of the cells. Chameleons do not, and even in reptiles that hibernate they have a slow cooling process to prepare their bodies. It's not a rapid thrust in freezing temperatures or they may suffer damage as well.
 
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