Egg Help!!!

Hey guys!!!
First post here as I am just getting started with this life changing journey of hopefully hatching 3 eggs. Purchased the three panther eggs for $150 as of two weeks ago and have been a stress case ever since...I feel like this is a home ec assignment for 30 year olds.

After doing research, building an incubator, and reading about generalized chameleon care my mind is slightly at ease.

My major concerns at this point are two things that have come to my attention as of the past couple of days.

#1) two of the three eggs appear to have hairline looking fractures running longways down them....is this normal?

#2) Will eggs sink or raise in the substrate that they are in? One appears to be sinking further into the substrate as when I bought it. One of the others appears to have swelled significantly to the point that it appears to be floating on the substrate.

After talking to the breeder I purchased from he mentioned cold won't harm the eggs which I called bs on hence the intervention of the incubator which will essentially be used during cold snaps this winter here in Northern California. With hatch dates of 2-15 on one and 3-1 for the other two I still have a journey ahead I know. At the same time should I be anticipating early babies?
 

janjan20

Chameleon Enthusiast
Welcome! Can you provide pics of the eggs and bin? Did the breeder mark the eggs so they are right side up?
Most members that incubate eggs do it at room temp. I am unfamiliar with automated incubators.
With you being in a colder part of Cali, what are your current home temps?
Once you post pics hopefully our resident eggsperts( :LOL:) can give better advice.
 

Redman

Avid Member
Incubation at higher than normal room temperature IS possible, but I wouldn't recommend it. I personally use a modified "Closet" method of panther egg incubation with incredibly good hatch rates (nearing 100%). The thing to remember about additional heat and humidity is that it makes a great formula for bacteria, which is not your friend.

I am sure that if you ask 20 people, you will get 20 different answers, but it's hard to argue with the success of the closet method.
 
Yeah in a normal insulated house I wouldn't have a problem with the closet method....my house was build in 1856 and has 0 insulation hence my concern.

Over the past week they have been in the range of 70-74 degrees. I have an inkbird 308 that I'm more than blown away with at this point. Gives me full control for $50.
 

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Beer optional?
 

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kinyonga

Chameleon Queen
The eggs look good to me.
I've never used that kind of substrate so I can't tell you if they will sink or not. (On vermiculite they don't seem to.)
 
I know absolutely nothing about bedding substrate this is what came with my eggs. Not oppose to switching it up but I figure the breeder picked what works for me. It doesn't look collapsible by any means essentially....best compared to lava rocks in my opinion. This whole stretch is foreign to be which is why I'm reaching out to you guys. I'm already well past $350 invested into this experiment which is why I'm so focused on making every think work out. Could have easily gotten a baby but I'm a believer that anything easily accomplished and isn't usually worth acheiving.
 
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