Egg barring?

Hello, I just got a baby veiled (I'm pretty sure female) on April 1st. I noticed she's been acting strangely. She's not been eating as much and when she wakes up she goes straight to her basking branch and stays there the whole day. Before this week she was active and going around the cage. Her cage temp stays around 70 but I can't get a temperature gun to find her basking temp. She also seems a tad chubbier than before, could she be laying eggs soon or is she sick? If she is laying eggs soon, is this okay for a laying bin? It is hermit crab sand in a dish.
 

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Haley Hendrix

Avid Member
Start off by filling out the form so we can help you. I think it’s a girl, she’s showing the markings of a girl and a temperament. She has a smaller casque so i’m thinking it’s a girl. She may be gravid. @MissSkittles can help
you with proper lay bins and everything. Also make sure that you’re cleaning out her cage daily.
Chameleon Info:

  • Your Chameleon - The species, sex, and age of your chameleon. How long has it been in your care?
  • Handling - How often do you handle your chameleon?
  • Feeding - What are you feeding your cham? What amount? What is the schedule? How are you gut-loading your feeders?
  • Supplements - What brand and type of calcium and vitamin products are you dusting your feeders with and what is the schedule?
  • Watering - What kind of watering technique do you use? How often and how long to you mist? Do you see your chameleon drinking?
  • Fecal Description - Briefly note colors and consistency from recent droppings. Has this chameleon ever been tested for parasites?
  • History - Any previous information about your cham that might be useful to others when trying to help you.

Cage Info:

  • Cage Type - Describe your cage (Glass, Screen, Combo?) What are the dimensions?
  • Lighting - What brand, model, and types of lighting are you using? What is your daily lighting schedule?
  • Temperature - What temp range have you created (cage floor to basking spot)? Lowest overnight temp? How do you measure these temps?
  • Humidity - What are your humidity levels? How are you creating and maintaining these levels? What do you use to measure humidity?
  • Plants - Are you using live plants? If so, what kind?
  • Placement - Where is your cage located? Is it near any fans, air vents, or high traffic areas? At what height is the top of the cage relative to your room floor?
  • Location - Where are you geographically located?
 
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MissSkittles

Chameleon Enthusiast
Hi. I’m not familiar with hermit crab sand either, but I’m going to say that any sand or other substrate bought at a pet store is most likely not an appropriate choice. A much better and safer choice is to get a bag of play sand (the kind used in children’s sandboxes) from a home improvement store. The problem with pet store sand is that it is usually calci sand, which (unlike natural sand) binds together in clumps and can cause impaction if eaten. Eco Earth and other substrates are usually just coco coir, which are too loose for lay bins. Your chameleon needs to dig tunnels down and across when she lays, so needs a substrate that will hold together when moist to allow this without collapsing and burying her.
She also need a large enough bin to be able to make her tunnels. I say that it needs to be at least 12” long and wide, but longer/wider is even better. As for depth, your substrate should be about 6” deep, so the bin should be at least 8” deep.
 
Ok so let's start with getting a picture if the back feet to tell the gender, it would also be helpful to have a picture of her on your hand to see how small she is.
I don't think she is comfortable with me yet so I haven't tried handling her, but here is what I could get of the back of her feet.
 

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Start off by filling out the form so we can help you. I think it’s a girl, she’s showing the markings of a girl and a temperament. She has a smaller casque so i’m thinking it’s a girl. She may be gravid. @MissSkittles can help
you with proper lay bins and everything. Also make sure that you’re cleaning out her cage daily.
Chameleon Info:

  • Your Chameleon - The species, sex, and age of your chameleon. How long has it been in your care?
  • Handling - How often do you handle your chameleon?
  • Feeding - What are you feeding your cham? What amount? What is the schedule? How are you gut-loading your feeders?
  • Supplements - What brand and type of calcium and vitamin products are you dusting your feeders with and what is the schedule?
  • Watering - What kind of watering technique do you use? How often and how long to you mist? Do you see your chameleon drinking?
  • Fecal Description - Briefly note colors and consistency from recent droppings. Has this chameleon ever been tested for parasites?
  • History - Any previous information about your cham that might be useful to others when trying to help you.

Cage Info:

  • Cage Type - Describe your cage (Glass, Screen, Combo?) What are the dimensions?
  • Lighting - What brand, model, and types of lighting are you using? What is your daily lighting schedule?
  • Temperature - What temp range have you created (cage floor to basking spot)? Lowest overnight temp? How do you measure these temps?
  • Humidity - What are your humidity levels? How are you creating and maintaining these levels? What do you use to measure humidity?
  • Plants - Are you using live plants? If so, what kind?
  • Placement - Where is your cage located? Is it near any fans, air vents, or high traffic areas? At what height is the top of the cage relative to your room floor?
  • Location - Where are you geographically located?
• Willow is a veiled chameleon, I'm pretty sure she's a female and I'm unsure of the age, maybe 3-5 months
• I have never handled her, I got her three weeks ago and she's still shy around me.
• I feed her two super worms at around 7 am when she wakes up and about two crickets at 1 pm and three mealworms around 4:30 pm
•I don't really have a supplement schedule yet, I've given her worms dusted with a multivitamin twice
• I hand mist her cage about three times a day when I notice it's getting dry.
• She's pretty consistent, her feces is a dark brown, almost black with off white urinates.
• I just got her April 1st, I don't know much about her.

•She has a 24x24x48 inch reptibreeze mesh cage.
•She has a 75 watt white heat bulb and a 24" reptisun T5 HO UBV light. I turn both lights on at 6:40 am and both off at 7:00 pm
•I don't have a temperature gun but her overall cage temp stays around 70 degrees day and night, I measure by a temperature and humidity level combo.
•Humidity levels stay around 40-60 in the day and they stay around 30-40 at night. I think I need an automatic misting system, which do you recommend for good affordable options?
•I have four types of plants in the cage, all live. I have a golden pothos, a cordyline, croton plant, and I do forget the name of the last one but I know it is mostly safe as long as she doesn't eat it.
• The cage is in the corner of my dining room, people mostly pass by but don't stay in the room often. The top of the cage is 70 inches from ground.
• I live in Ohio (United States), the weather ranges in humidity and temperature so it is hard to say
 

MissSkittles

Chameleon Enthusiast
I’ll be putting my feedback in red. :)
• Willow is a veiled chameleon, I'm pretty sure she's a female and I'm unsure of the age, maybe 3-5 months Love the name! She does look like a pretty little she to me.
• I have never handled her, I got her three weeks ago and she's still shy around me.
• I feed her two super worms at around 7 am when she wakes up and about two crickets at 1 pm and three mealworms around 4:30 pm Attaching feeder and ‘gutloading’ graphics. It’s best to feed just once in the morning which gives time for basking to digest. The feeder graphic will explain about feeder choices. I’m not the best at determining age, and feeding amounts vary by age. I’m going to guess she should be having around 7-8 feeders once daily. As she starts reaching about 6 months, you’ll want to cut her back to feeding every other day. We try not to over feed our ladies as they reach maturity to help reduce their egg laying and I’ll make a separate reply addressing that.
It is important to feed the feeders well so that they provide more nutrition. I feed my bugs fresh dandelion greens, watercress, chard, collards, various types of squash, sweet potato and Repashy Bug Burger in which I’ve added some bee pollen. I keep them well fed so I don’t need to specifically gutload.

•I don't really have a supplement schedule yet, I've given her worms dusted with a multivitamin twice Proper supplements are essential! A great schedule is to lightly dust all feeders at every feeding with a phosphorus free calcium without vitamin D3. One feeding every other week you’ll use Reptivite with D3. The Reptivite is a combined multivitamin and D3 and is a good and easy choice.
• I hand mist her cage about three times a day when I notice it's getting dry. You do want the enclosure to dry out in between misting. Usually misting 2-3 times a day for at least 2 minutes is perfect.
• She's pretty consistent, her feces is a dark brown, almost black with off white urinates.
• I just got her April 1st, I don't know much about her.

•She has a 24x24x48 inch reptibreeze mesh cage. Beautiful!
•She has a 75 watt white heat bulb and a 24" reptisun T5 HO UBV light. I turn both lights on at 6:40 am and both off at 7:00 pm Great! What strength is the uvb bulb? If 5.0 or 6% you’ll be perfect and want to make sure basking area is about 8” away from lights. If anything higher, you’ll need to make sure that there is about 12” from the light to basking area.
•I don't have a temperature gun but her overall cage temp stays around 70 degrees day and night, I measure by a temperature and humidity level combo. This is most likely the reason that she is dark. Basking temp should be around 80f. A digital thermometer with a probe is the best way to measure temps. At night lower temps are ideal.
•Humidity levels stay around 40-60 in the day and they stay around 30-40 at night. So daytime should be between 30-50% and at night can/should be 80-100%. Many use a cool mist humidifier at night to boost humidity. I love my Mist King and instead set 2-3 brief misting during the night to boost humidity. I think I need an automatic misting system, which do you recommend for good affordable options? Mist King! While you can find Reptirain and such a bit cheaper, they can’t come close to Mist King for reliability and flexibility. They are well worth the extra cost.
•I have four types of plants in the cage, all live. I have a golden pothos, a cordyline, croton plant, and I do forget the name of the last one but I know it is mostly safe as long as she doesn't eat it. I can’t find much info if the cordyline is safe for reptiles. As veileds do eat their plants, they do need to be safe.
• The cage is in the corner of my dining room, people mostly pass by but don't stay in the room often. The top of the cage is 70 inches from ground. (y)
• I live in Ohio (United States), the weather ranges in humidity and temperature so it is hard to say

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I’ll be putting my feedback in red. :)
• Willow is a veiled chameleon, I'm pretty sure she's a female and I'm unsure of the age, maybe 3-5 months Love the name! She does look like a pretty little she to me.
• I have never handled her, I got her three weeks ago and she's still shy around me.
• I feed her two super worms at around 7 am when she wakes up and about two crickets at 1 pm and three mealworms around 4:30 pm Attaching feeder and ‘gutloading’ graphics. It’s best to feed just once in the morning which gives time for basking to digest. The feeder graphic will explain about feeder choices. I’m not the best at determining age, and feeding amounts vary by age. I’m going to guess she should be having around 7-8 feeders once daily. As she starts reaching about 6 months, you’ll want to cut her back to feeding every other day. We try not to over feed our ladies as they reach maturity to help reduce their egg laying and I’ll make a separate reply addressing that.
It is important to feed the feeders well so that they provide more nutrition. I feed my bugs fresh dandelion greens, watercress, chard, collards, various types of squash, sweet potato and Repashy Bug Burger in which I’ve added some bee pollen. I keep them well fed so I don’t need to specifically gutload.

•I don't really have a supplement schedule yet, I've given her worms dusted with a multivitamin twice Proper supplements are essential! A great schedule is to lightly dust all feeders at every feeding with a phosphorus free calcium without vitamin D3. One feeding every other week you’ll use Reptivite with D3. The Reptivite is a combined multivitamin and D3 and is a good and easy choice.
• I hand mist her cage about three times a day when I notice it's getting dry. You do want the enclosure to dry out in between misting. Usually misting 2-3 times a day for at least 2 minutes is perfect.
• She's pretty consistent, her feces is a dark brown, almost black with off white urinates.
• I just got her April 1st, I don't know much about her.

•She has a 24x24x48 inch reptibreeze mesh cage. Beautiful!
•She has a 75 watt white heat bulb and a 24" reptisun T5 HO UBV light. I turn both lights on at 6:40 am and both off at 7:00 pm Great! What strength is the uvb bulb? If 5.0 or 6% you’ll be perfect and want to make sure basking area is about 8” away from lights. If anything higher, you’ll need to make sure that there is about 12” from the light to basking area.
•I don't have a temperature gun but her overall cage temp stays around 70 degrees day and night, I measure by a temperature and humidity level combo. This is most likely the reason that she is dark. Basking temp should be around 80f. A digital thermometer with a probe is the best way to measure temps. At night lower temps are ideal.
•Humidity levels stay around 40-60 in the day and they stay around 30-40 at night. So daytime should be between 30-50% and at night can/should be 80-100%. Many use a cool mist humidifier at night to boost humidity. I love my Mist King and instead set 2-3 brief misting during the night to boost humidity. I think I need an automatic misting system, which do you recommend for good affordable options? Mist King! While you can find Reptirain and such a bit cheaper, they can’t come close to Mist King for reliability and flexibility. They are well worth the extra cost.
•I have four types of plants in the cage, all live. I have a golden pothos, a cordyline, croton plant, and I do forget the name of the last one but I know it is mostly safe as long as she doesn't eat it. I can’t find much info if the cordyline is safe for reptiles. As veileds do eat their plants, they do need to be safe.
• The cage is in the corner of my dining room, people mostly pass by but don't stay in the room often. The top of the cage is 70 inches from ground. (y)
• I live in Ohio (United States), the weather ranges in humidity and temperature so it is hard to say

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Thank you so much! Her ubv is a 5.0. I will definitely be getting her different vitamins, looking for a misting system, and getting a better thermometer. The plant I forgot was an umbrella plant, she loves that and sleeps in it every night. Thank you!
 

MissSkittles

Chameleon Enthusiast
Umbrella trees are perfect for chameleons!
So here is where I’ll tell you about the laying process. Laying eggs takes so much out of our sweet little ladies and shortens their lives. Having very large clutches also increase the risks of becoming egg-bound. We can try to reduce both the frequency of laying and the amount of eggs produced thru diet and temperature. IMO it’s a little tricky until they have laid their first time, but I’m not as experienced as some. They can start laying as young as 5-6 months old and to me, reducing their feedings may also inadvertently reduce their needed nutrition.
You’ll know she’s reached sexual maturity when her big girl colors come in...beautiful teals, oranges or yellows. Around the same time she may get very restless...constantly on the move and exploring every nook and cranny of her enclosure. She’s basically gotten all prettied up and is now looking for a man. ;) She’ll be like this for anywhere from 1-3 weeks or so. This is when you need to get your lay bin ready and put it in her enclosure. Sometime in the next few weeks or so, you’ll see she’s getting plump and may be lumpy near her hind end. She may start eating less. One day you’ll find she isn’t in her normal spot and you’ll find she’s in her lay bin and has started digging. Quietly cover the visible parts of her enclosure and give her total privacy to do her thing. When I think my girls are close, I keep a light sheet attached to the side of their enclosure so when it is time, I just pull it and clip it in place. Sometimes I just put it in place daily so they will feel more secure in going to their bin. I do peek in discretely (cut little holes in the sheet) every now and then to make sure they are ok. The whole process takes 1-2 days. You’ll know she’s done when she’s fully covered her holes and is sitting on her basking branch like nothing happened. I make sure to give my girls some hornworms and/or silkworms to help hydrate them and give a good long misting. You’ll want to feed her very well for 2-3 days after and then start her new diet. You’ll want to cut her feedings down to 3-4 feeders, 3 days a week. I also give occasional treats. This is what I’ve done for my 2 veiled beauties and while both have been receptive a few times in the past year, one hasn’t laid in over a year and the other went almost one year exactly before laying. She did sneak peeks at my male veiled and I’m not sure if that’s what triggered her to produce eggs, while the other girl hasn’t.
I already told you about the lay bin, but here’s a great graphic on it.
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kinyonga

Chameleon Queen
@MissSkittles said..."IMO it’s a little tricky until they have laid their first time"...this is very hard to judge because ideally you want her to be pretty much full grown but to cut the clutch size it seems they need to be cut back just before they get their big girl colors...and who can figure that out??

You said.."They can start laying as young as 5-6 months old and to me, reducing their feedings may also inadvertently reduce their needed nutrition"..another issue I've always struggled with.

You said..."the other went almost one year exactly before laying. She did sneak peeks at my male veiled and I’m not sure if that’s what triggered her to produce eggs, while the other girl hasn’t"...it's always been thought that seeing the male can kick the female into egg production. I've never tried to prove it....so in not sure.

IMHO, even getting the to only lay a couple of dozen eggs per clutch is a good step to them living longer with proper husbandry.
 
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