easiest way to catch chameleons

shane dewar

New Member
we have plenty of flapneck chameleons in my area, i have been tryng sooo hard to find one but i just havent been able to:mad:. when would be the best time to look and where, plsssssss help me!!!
 

Chameleon Nation

New Member
I would say the easiest way would be to go out at night with a flashlight. Chameleons will go out to the ends of branches to sleep. Thus avoids any predators that may be lurking near the trunk looking for an easy meal. Chameleons are also at their brightest while they are sleeping. They should stick out like a sore thumb when you run a flashlight accross them.
 

chameleonneeds

Avid Member
You must live in S.A?

People most commonly find them crossing roads. If you are so sure that there are plenty around then you should see some crossing roads every now and then...
Otherwise just look in the plants at day and night...
 

Eltortu

Established Member
we have plenty of flapneck chameleons in my area, i have been tryng sooo hard to find one but i just havent been able to:mad:. when would be the best time to look and where, plsssssss help me!!!
Plenty, but hard to find?...hhmmm...
 

Jakama

Member
DChalo and Chameleonneeds, both of your arguments are very flawed. Chameleons do not have feelings, at least not in the way we do. They do not get sad because they miss their friends and family. What does matter, however, is preserving ecosystems. The issue here is not whether the chameleon will be happy, but whether the person who is catching these chameleons in the wild is damaging the ecosystem. In light of this, I post the question: Are flap-necked chameleons invasive to South Africa? If yes, then catching them and getting them out of the wild is very much a good deed. But if they are a native species, then catching them in the wild can only result in a damaged ecosystem. Shell out a Benjamin, for Pete's sake, it's worth it to keep these pets in check.
 

chameleonneeds

Avid Member
If you knew mostly of what you were talking about then you would of atleast known that Flap necks are not invasive to S.A, they are found almost all over Africa.

If you are a person concerned so much about their ecosystem then you should stop keeping chams you support the market in a way even if your cham is like 10th generation captive bred, it all started somewhere.

So actualy I dont know what you mean about my argument being flawed - explain
 

dreamforthedead

New Member
Do you want to keep it as a pet? Why take one from the wild? Even just catching one would mostly likely just stress the poor thing out.
 

JoeG

New Member
I caught one once by dressing an orphan in a cricket suit. He was hunted down by a lion chameleon. As I saw his tongue ready to snap, I swooped down from the jungle canopy , hogtied him with his own tongue & dragged him out of the woods slung over my back. Still have him today....... Just kidding, good luck
 

dreamforthedead

New Member
I caught one once by dressing an orphan in a cricket suit. He was hunted down by a lion chameleon. As I saw his tongue ready to snap, I swooped down from the jungle canopy , hogtied him with his own tongue & dragged him out of the woods slung over my back. Still have him today....... Just kidding, good luck
LMAO :D:p:p
 

chameleonoobie

New Member
Every now and then a chameleon must leave it’s home to help save it. Some chameleons are taken from the wild, treated for parasites, fed like kings, live a worry and stress free life being spoiled rotten. If really lucky, they get to have a mate and successfully reproduce, which is their primary purpose. The owner and chameleon enjoy a symbiotic relationship, where the owner gets to share the life of a delicate and wonderful creature, and the chameleon gets a servant caretaker and body guard. When more humans come to know and admire the chameleon, the world might be spared just one tiny bit more from habitat destruction and wonton disregard for all the mysterious creatures that still live there.
 

Hoj

Friendly Grasshopper
Every now and then a chameleon must leave it’s home to help save it. Some chameleons are taken from the wild, treated for parasites, fed like kings, live a worry and stress free life being spoiled rotten. If really lucky, they get to have a mate and successfully reproduce, which is their primary purpose. The owner and chameleon enjoy a symbiotic relationship, where the owner gets to share the life of a delicate and wonderful creature, and the chameleon gets a servant caretaker and body guard. When more humans come to know and admire the chameleon, the world might be spared just one tiny bit more from habitat destruction and wonton disregard for all the mysterious creatures that still live there.
very well said
 
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