DIY hatching eggs?

Calypratus

Established Member
I was scrolling through ebay the other day when I noticed that you can buy live panther chameleon eggs. Does anyone know if these are a scam or unethical in any way? I have been looking for panther chameleons.
 

SharpShooter

Avid Member
I was scrolling through ebay the other day when I noticed that you can buy live panther chameleon eggs. Does anyone know if these are a scam or unethical in any way? I have been looking for panther chameleons.
Yes, you can do this. Not sure I would buy from any one I didn't at least have glowing reviews for though.

Glowing reviews in mind, @Matt Vanilla Gorilla can supply you with an egg I believe.
 

Calypratus

Established Member
I'm not really looking for an egg. I probably couldn't handle a baby. Last time I checked they are much higher maintenance! Just ttrying to look for a slightly cheaper panther chameleon.
 

SharpShooter

Avid Member
I'm not really looking for an egg. I probably couldn't handle a baby. Last time I checked they are much higher maintenance! Just ttrying to look for a slightly cheaper panther chameleon.
With respect, chams and their care are expensive. If anyone is not in a position to afford the animal, then it's doubtful they can afford a vet trip if its ever needed.

Can't afford the vet, shouldn't have the pet.
 

Calypratus

Established Member
I can in fact afford a vet trip, however some panther chameleons tend to be on pricey side and i'm a little reluctant to pay 300$ dollars for a lizard when I can get the same lizard for 170$. Many sites and breeders have morphs that are expensive. I'm simply looking for a basic panther chameleon (no special colors or mutations or anything). Different breeders have different prices and I'm looking for a breeder that sells lizards at i slightly cheaper price ( My current budget is 250$).
 

Beman

Chameleon Enthusiast
Ok not trying to come off wrong. But cheaper is not better in the world of chameleons.... Do you want one you could ever handle? Do you want one that is healthy and has had the proper husbandry? They are expensive because they are breed with care, time, and thoughtfulness not just their colors. With an egg a lot goes into incubating, hatching, housing, feeding to get it to an age where you don't have to be so concerned. This is why they are more expensive at $300 it takes a lot of time and effort to raise them to be healthy and strong. Honestly I do not feel that $300 is expensive. I would not just buy from anyone because I would want to know where the baby was coming from and that it was genetically healthy as well. $300 vs $170 when you are not getting the same chameleon at all.
I don't think this is something where money can be an issue overall. I have spent over $1800 now on everything... cage, misting system, fogger, lighting, chameleon, vet trip, live plants, wet dry vac for cleaning, special antibacterial cleaner, supplements, feeder food, RO water, little dripper, Cabinet to house everything in, insect holders, feeders, and a desktop area for my guy to hang out on.
It is expensive to provide the right everything so when you look at the overall cost of what you need to have in order to provide the right husbandry then $300 for an amazing chameleon is nothing.
 

SharpShooter

Avid Member
It would appear from what you say that money is your biggest consideration in getting another cham. Trying to keep a cham on a budget doesn't work in general terms and we unfortunately see the results on here daily.

Way too many people jump into getting a cham without research and the full understanding of what the animal needs.

The ridiculously low cost of veileds proliferate this as many wonder why they should need to spend hundreds (if not well over a thousand) on a 'lizard' that cost only 50 quid. Unfortunately it's the poor cham that pays the ultimate price for this attitude.

If someone is prepared to pay top price for a good animal, they are far more likely to invest in the care it requires.

My opinion, like it or lump it, rant over.
 

GoodKarma19

Chameleon Enthusiast
My advice would be to save up a bit and get a quality animal from a quality breeder. There's no reason to rush into getting a new cham! You'll save yourself and your future pet a lot of pain and heartache if you take the time to choose a healthy specimen and make sure all of your ducks are in a row. Cutting corners doesn't do anyone any good, and the last thing you want is to pay less upfront only to have possible health issues to contend with along the line!

You could also, with a bit of work and research, repurpose your enclosure to suit other arboreal species. I'm considering a getting a crested gecko at some point, myself! I was having a blast interacting with one at work the other day, and discovered through talking with the owner that there's a long standing crestie breeder near me. I might have to get ahold of them at some point in the (distant) future, once I get my expenses under control and finish up with my certification.


~Amanda
 

Calypratus

Established Member
Do you guys know any good breeders in NC? I would love to support a local business! I'll probably get it in the summer when my school is out, so if any issues arise I have more time to address them without other things in the way. By then i'll probably have enough money to get a healthy one!
 

CamoChameleonsHuman

Chameleon Enthusiast
I most likely purchase an adult or sub-adult, because last time i checked babies tend to be hard to care for.
Then you will be looking at $400-500 for a Panther. The older they are the more expensive.
If I recall correctly you just lost a female veiled due to being egg bound correct? Females (if healthy) should have no problem laying their eggs. Clearly there was a problem with your husbandry for this to have accord. Or maybe simply you didn't understand the differences and seriousness of owning a female veiled instead of a male. I think you need to do more research and correct some things before you should even consider getting a $300-$500 chameleon. Just my 2¢
 

JoshD49

Chameleon Enthusiast
Please no offense here but I agree with the above and also ensure you have the resources to take care of it since you said your parents are not willing to help.
 

Calypratus

Established Member
Yes she had some issues with laying her eggs. I suspect it was because I put her in the laying bin to late. Tbh I don’t really know. After she was showing signs of being ready to lay I put her in a large plastic bin with about ten inches of moist play sand, she started digging and by morning she had finished digging and was in the hole but there were no eggs just a dead chameleon. I honestly have no idea what it could have been. I didn’t have any issues with her until she was about to lay her eggs ( she would not drink nor eat at all)
 

Calypratus

Established Member
I have since used all money on ensuring I have the perfect setup. I bought a monsoon misting system to replace my old amazon mister, a few live plants, a Arcadia 6% t5 Bulb and the hood, and more branches and things to climb on. I have also since then fed my crickets more nutrient dense food. I truly love these animals and am wanting to provide the best life for one of my own
 

Calypratus

Established Member
My dad is starting to get quite interested in chameleons himself and is willing to buy any nessecary equipment (given I work for it later)
 

Calypratus

Established Member
To prove my point here is a pic of here one month before she was gravid
 

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She might be a little dehydrated in that picture. It is hard to tell with all the shadows in the places where they are in the picture. Dehydration is detrimental to gravid female chameleons.
 
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