Chams hearing

Itz_bean

New Member
So my sleep schedule is kinda off and I stay up till like 2 to 3 am everyday and play games w my friends, while I'm playing I like to listen to metal core and songs with alot of bass, how are chams sleep affected by that? Will I have to start listening to music with headphones or just at a lower volume ?
 

Beman

Chameleon Enthusiast
So my sleep schedule is kinda off and I stay up till like 2 to 3 am everyday and play games w my friends, while I'm playing I like to listen to metal core and songs with alot of bass, how are chams sleep affected by that? Will I have to start listening to music with headphones or just at a lower volume ?
So they do not hear the way we do but they feel the vibrations. So yes if your blasting music with a ton of base then this is not the best. More importantly though how bright is the room that the cham is in? They need a 12 hour lights on and 12 hours total darkness period. So your tv and room lights would cause issues.
 

Itz_bean

New Member
So they do not hear the way we do but they feel the vibrations. So yes if your blasting music with a ton of base then this is not the best. More importantly though how bright is the room that the cham is in? They need a 12 hour lights on and 12 hours total darkness period. So your tv and room lights would cause issues.
The only lights I have on at night is my monitor and like a pink led behind it, will that be ok ?
 

Itz_bean

New Member
Depends on how bright and if it right in front of the cham cage.
Its fairly close and there not bright i keep them at like 50 percent and my chair is in front of the cage so I think it should block most of the light
 

CasqueAbove

Chameleon Enthusiast
Ask the Cham. They can be very adaptive but not always. So by ask the chameleon, and those hours he should be so asleep it feels like you could touch him. If eyes open quick, he is not sleeping well.
 

Klyde O'Scope

Chameleon Enthusiast
"chameleons do not have an outer or a middle ear, so there is neither an ear opening nor an eardrum. However, chameleons are not deaf: they can detect sound frequencies in the range of 200–600 Hz."...

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chameleon

Just found this yesterday.
Measurements of auditory sensitivity in terms of the electrical potentials of the cochlea were carried out in two species, Chamaeleo senegalensis and Chamaeleo quilensis. The results indicated poor sensitivity in comparison with lizards in general, yet the performance was not far below that found in many species with conventional sound-conducting systems. The frequency range extended from 100 to 10,000 cps, with the best sensitivity in the region of 200 to 600 cps.

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/jez.1401680403
(Emphasis mine) Might they actually hear more than we think?
 

kinyonga

Chameleon Queen
You said..."Might they actually hear more than we think?"...
Maybe...and maybe the level of hearing is different in the ones that use vibrations as part of the communication too.
 

Beman

Chameleon Enthusiast
Ask the Cham. They can be very adaptive but not always. So by ask the chameleon, and those hours he should be so asleep it feels like you could touch him. If eyes open quick, he is not sleeping well.
*poke the bear* :hilarious: very true though.

gareth edwards godzilla GIF
 

kinyonga

Chameleon Queen
"Interestingly, di erent auditory sensitivities were recorded for species of the genus Chamaeleo versus the genus Trioceros, with T. hoehnelii and T. jacksonii having poorer auditory performance than all species of Chamaeleo (Wever, 1968, 1969a). Moreover, severing of the columella decreased hearing performance in species of the genus Chamaeleo but not Trioceros. This was explained by a di erence in the sound-reception mechanisms in the two genera. Whereas aerial sounds are received by the pterygoid plate embedded in the tissues at the side of the head in species of Chamaeleo (Wever, 1968, 1969b), this system is dysfunctional in Trioceros because of the lack of the anterior pro- cess of the extracolumella (Wever, 1969a)"...
http://www.anthonyherrel.fr/publications/Herrel 2013 Physiology - Chameleon Book.pdf
 

Klyde O'Scope

Chameleon Enthusiast
You said..."Might they actually hear more than we think?"...
Maybe...and maybe the level of hearing is different in the ones that use vibrations as part of the communication too.
My point was that many sources cite the 200-600Hz, but—for whatever reason—never mention that they still hear in the 100-10KHz range, albeit not well. Vibration can certainly be measured/detected in those ranges.

"Interestingly, di erent auditory sensitivities were recorded for species of the genus Chamaeleo versus the genus Trioceros, with T. hoehnelii and T. jacksonii having poorer auditory performance than all species of Chamaeleo (Wever, 1968, 1969a). Moreover, severing of the columella decreased hearing performance in species of the genus Chamaeleo but not Trioceros. This was explained by a di erence in the sound-reception mechanisms in the two genera. Whereas aerial sounds are received by the pterygoid plate embedded in the tissues at the side of the head in species of Chamaeleo (Wever, 1968, 1969b), this system is dysfunctional in Trioceros because of the lack of the anterior pro- cess of the extracolumella (Wever, 1969a)"...
http://www.anthonyherrel.fr/publications/Herrel 2013 Physiology - Chameleon Book.pdf
Don't have my medical dictionary handy (busy with the other project ;) but they're all odd little critters. :) Such diversity, yet so many similarities. 🤓
 
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