Chameleon won’t go back in cage

Klyde O'Scope

Chameleon Enthusiast
Entertaining discussion.

We let our panther out the other day to do some serious plant work in his enclosure. He got out once before on his own, and AFAIK, stayed around the Missus' plant table next to the enclosure.

So this time, we just put him on a rubber tree and went to work. He climbed all over that table, up the hanging plants, back down again, down to the window seat, up the mullion, fell off, up the drapes, back on the rubber plant, back up the hanging spider plant... This went on for the few hours it took us to fix things.

Several times now I've used a stick, dowel, bamboo stake... whatever was handy to relocate him out of danger—and to put him back home. I slide it from the front under his chest, and carefully lift (like a pizza board). He's inevitably forced to grab the stick or lose his balance and hold of whatever he's on—he doesn't have a choice. One foot, two feet, 3 feet... when number 4 grabs the stick, you've got him/her. If he gapes, hisses, or snaps, I ignore him, and speak to him softly—"Silly lizard... Aren't you scary?" That kind of stuff.

It works, he's getting used to it, and he's not gaping, hissing or snapping as much. Just be gentle.

And yes, I have been bitten by both lizards when they were small, but not by either since. More of a pinch.
 

Muffin28

Member
Entertaining discussion.

We let our panther out the other day to do some serious plant work in his enclosure. He got out once before on his own, and AFAIK, stayed around the Missus' plant table next to the enclosure.

So this time, we just put him on a rubber tree and went to work. He climbed all over that table, up the hanging plants, back down again, down to the window seat, up the mullion, fell off, up the drapes, back on the rubber plant, back up the hanging spider plant... This went on for the few hours it took us to fix things.

Several times now I've used a stick, dowel, bamboo stake... whatever was handy to relocate him out of danger—and to put him back home. I slide it from the front under his chest, and carefully lift (like a pizza board). He's inevitably forced to grab the stick or lose his balance and hold of whatever he's on—he doesn't have a choice. One foot, two feet, 3 feet... when number 4 grabs the stick, you've got him/her. If he gapes, hisses, or snaps, I ignore him, and speak to him softly—"Silly lizard... Aren't you scary?" That kind of stuff.

It works, he's getting used to it, and he's not gaping, hissing or snapping as much. Just be gentle.

And yes, I have been bitten by both lizards when they were small, but not by either since. More of a pinch.
“Like a pizza board”
I love lol
 

Muffin28

Member
He started to move again but he is just going back up the cage. Might have to call a tall friend to help get him down
ugg.. Wish I could help. Next option stick... but put it up under him not in his face.
We have movement !! But he’s at the top top again

I placed pillows at the bottom just in case

looks like he’s gonna go back in on his own. More to come !! 😂
 

Beman

Chameleon Enthusiast
We have movement !! But he’s at the top top again

I placed pillows at the bottom just in case

looks like he’s gonna go back in on his own. More to come !! 😂
Do you have a ladder so if he goes to the very top you can get him down? Maybe call for reinforcements :hilarious:
 

Muffin28

Member
Just put 5 pairs of pants on your arms and scoop him up 😂
SUCCESS 😂 I had my friend come help me

I also just noticed how LONG he is. He is gonna be a year this month

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MissSkittles

Chameleon Enthusiast
Your guy (and you) had quite the adventure! I use the ‘corral’ method when needing to handle my chams...correction: my veileds. They are so busy turning this way and that to hiss that I’m able to get a hand under their feet. Confidence is key.
 

Klyde O'Scope

Chameleon Enthusiast
“Like a pizza board”
I love lol
It's a technique I started with my bearded dragon. With him I used a wooden ruler; a paint stick would work as well. Beardies don't grab the stick, so it really is more like scooping them up on a pizza board—I wish I had pics of the look on his face... :LOL:

With most animals I've had, I've found it's a matter of distracting and befuddling them in order to disarm them and diffuse the situation. When Ol' Stinkeye (the beardie) would gape & hiss, I'd slowly approach from the front (and slightly above—but carefully) and pet him on the head with one finger. This was when he was still small; IDT it would work with an adult. Part of working with animals is being prepared to get bitten—or scratched, or whatever, and knowing ahead of time what your defense/response is going to be, and NEVER lose your temper. They're just doing what Nature programmed them to do. ;)
 

Muffin28

Member
It's a technique I started with my bearded dragon. With him I used a wooden ruler; a paint stick would work as well. Beardies don't grab the stick, so it really is more like scooping them up on a pizza board—I wish I had pics of the look on his face... :LOL:

With most animals I've had, I've found it's a matter of distracting and befuddling them in order to disarm them and diffuse the situation. When Ol' Stinkeye (the beardie) would gape & hiss, I'd slowly approach from the front (and slightly above—but carefully) and pet him on the head with one finger. This was when he was still small; IDT it would work with an adult. Part of working with animals is being prepared to get bitten—or scratched, or whatever, and knowing ahead of time what your defense/response is going to be, and NEVER lose your temper. They're just doing what Nature programmed them to do. ;)
It's a technique I started with my bearded dragon. With him I used a wooden ruler; a paint stick would work as well. Beardies don't grab the stick, so it really is more like scooping them up on a pizza board—I wish I had pics of the look on his face... :LOL:

With most animals I've had, I've found it's a matter of distracting and befuddling them in order to disarm them and diffuse the situation. When Ol' Stinkeye (the beardie) would gape & hiss, I'd slowly approach from the front (and slightly above—but carefully) and pet him on the head with one finger. This was when he was still small; IDT it would work with an adult. Part of working with animals is being prepared to get bitten—or scratched, or whatever, and knowing ahead of time what your defense/response is going to be, and NEVER lose your temper. They're just doing what Nature programmed them to do. ;)
Honestly once I put on the mitt it was easy peasy lol

I was like “HAHA you can’t get me now”
 
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