Can you tell?

Laekyloo

New Member
Hey everyone! First time Cham owner here. I have a four month old veiled who loves to eat crickets. I have a drip system and I also mist his leaves so that he can drink but I haven’t seen him try to drink anything. Sooo, trying to be a good Cham mom, I posted a pic of his poop. I know it’s gross! But I just want to know if it looks good, or what you all can tell from it. Thanks!!
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CamoChameleonsHuman

Chameleon Enthusiast
A bit of dehydration in the urate. We're aiming for pure white urates but a little yellow or orange is OK. Are you using any live plants?

Chameleons can be shy eaters or shy drinkers or both. It's a vulnerable time for them. Automisting systems can help with this.
 

Graves923

Chameleon Enthusiast
How long have you had the chameleon? Cage temps?

I agree with what Camo stated. Its been two years since I've seen my chameleon drink water.
Misting for about 3-5 minutes right before lights out at night will help with the naturalistic hydration. Chameleons and a lot of other reptiles get a good part of their hydration through respiration at night.

I also suggest a good morning misting just after lights come on.
 

Laekyloo

New Member
How long have you had the chameleon? Cage temps?

I agree with what Camo stated. Its been two years since I've seen my chameleon drink water.
Misting for about 3-5 minutes right before lights out at night will help with the naturalistic hydration. Chameleons and a lot of other reptiles get a good part of their hydration through respiration at night.

I also suggest a good morning misting just after lights come on.
I just got him on Sunday, so not very long. I’m still in the process of buying stuff for his cage. I am currently misting the cage myself but I want to get an automatic mister. As far as temps, his basking spot is around 83 and the lower part of his cage is 75. He normally sits on his basking area all day.
 

Laekyloo

New Member
A bit of dehydration in the urate. We're aiming for pure white urates but a little yellow or orange is OK. Are you using any live plants?

Chameleons can be shy eaters or shy drinkers or both. It's a vulnerable time for them. Automisting systems can help with this.
I don’t have anything in there yet that is alive as far as plants. I will be getting some here within the next few days. I bought the kit from Petco which I learned didn’t have very much in it. So I am in the process of getting more for his cage
 

AnamCara

Chameleon Enthusiast
It is important to note how *long* a chameleon goes between poops. If it is more than a few days they can re absorb some of the urate and it can become more orange. Depending on what she is eating Mona can go a week without pooping -- silks make her more regular. When she goes a long time without pooping it is more orange on one end.

Other signs of dehydration are sunken eyes --
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Although the above picture is pretty durastic it gives you an idea.

If you just got the chameleon it will take time for them to adjust to you. Take a look around here and listen to The Cameleon Breeder Podcast and you'll be in good hands.

Let us know if you are interested in reviewing and possibly fine-tuning your husbandry -- we love chameleons here (obviously) and would be more than happy to help.
 
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Ruthless

Avid Member
Those chameleon kits are garbage. But you found out the hard way. Hydration is a big factor in a healthy Cham and a Mistking or Climist system can be your best friend this plus a a good lighting and heat source and your almost complete. If your not planning on hanging plants from the sides of the cage by using something like dragon strand ledges then I would get a umbrella plant and some branches for for horizontal perching to start off with.
 

Graves923

Chameleon Enthusiast
You just got the cham so it probably wasn't getting the best hydration before you got it home. Keep up with regular misting and let the enclosure dry out in between sessions. Keep an eye on the urates and if there is no change in a week or so, then I would start becoming concerned.

Adding live plants to fill the enclosure helps maintain humidity and holds water droplets better than the plastic plants.
 
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