can you keep 2 different species of pygmes together or not

eisentrauti

Avid Member
To quote the famous leader of the greatest country: "yes, you can !"
To come back to a serious basis, it depends on how long you will try it this. Sooner or later one party will die...
 
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Carlton

Chameleon Enthusiast
as the title states :)


p.s dont be nasty its just a question
I think the best way to answer your own question is to consider the following:

1. Do the species you want to keep occur in the same habitat in the wild?
If not, why subject an easily stressed animal to an unnatural situation? Keeping them in captivity on their own is hard enough. Subjecting them to some strange unknown or aggressive cage mate that they cannot escape from could tip them over the brink.

2. Can you be sure that one species won't introduce a toxin, a parasite, a bacteria that the other species has no resistance to?
If not, why take the risk?

3. Do you completely understand the needs of each species (space, personal territory, microclimates for basking, drinking, hunting, resting)?
If not, you can miss something important but subtle. One or the other species will probably "win" and the other will decline, get sick, and die.

4. Do you not have the space to give each captive its own territory?
If not, stick to one species and let them thrive. If you really want another species create a unique territory for it in another place. It is always better not to crowd chams of any type. You would probably get to enjoy more natural behavior and activity if they each have their own space anyway. Stressed and inhibited chams are boring.
 

harry7890

New Member
I think the best way to answer your own question is to consider the following:

1. Do the species you want to keep occur in the same habitat in the wild?
If not, why subject an easily stressed animal to an unnatural situation? Keeping them in captivity on their own is hard enough. Subjecting them to some strange unknown or aggressive cage mate that they cannot escape from could tip them over the brink.

2. Can you be sure that one species won't introduce a toxin, a parasite, a bacteria that the other species has no resistance to?
If not, why take the risk?

3. Do you completely understand the needs of each species (space, personal territory, microclimates for basking, drinking, hunting, resting)?
If not, you can miss something important but subtle. One or the other species will probably "win" and the other will decline, get sick, and die.

4. Do you not have the space to give each captive its own territory?
If not, stick to one species and let them thrive. If you really want another species create a unique territory for it in another place. It is always better not to crowd chams of any type. You would probably get to enjoy more natural behavior and activity if they each have their own space anyway. Stressed and inhibited chams are boring.
a simple no would have sufficed ;) hehe , thankyou for that i will bear that in mind but i will just stick to the one species :) in the one tank :)didnt concider all that.


thanyou everyone else for you replys
 

harry7890

New Member
yes and i thank you for it :) a no can often leave you wondering why?? so thankyou for righting that out , im sure it will help others too not just me :)
 
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