Baby T. johnstonii!!!

So I came home from the reptile super show today in San Diego and came straight to the incubator, opened the container up and there were 5 beautiful baby johnston's. There were 12 eggs total and all the others look great still with a couple others with their eggs slit.
Here are some crappy pics of them lol. Enjoy!









 

ponders

Chameleon Enthusiast
OMG congrats Paul! What a nice surprise to come home to!

I think I see mine right there, that little green girl! :D
 

Rango3d

Avid Member
You learn something new every day. I thought they had live birth not eggs.
Awesome!:D
Put me on the list for 1.
I have wanted 1 for some time now.
 
Congrats! I love that species. Back in the late 80s to early 90s, I had quite a few clutches. I always had a good hatch rate. I wasn't successful raising any of them to adulthood though because their high sensitivity to vitamins, especially D3, wasn't fully realized.

I remember raising houseflies for them. At first, the babies did fine. Then I made the mistake of using powdered milk as part of the mix to feed the fly larvae. Big mistake! Even without using powdered supplements on the flies, the babies quickly developed edemas. I have little doubt that the D3 in the powdered milk was responsible. Feeding non-supplemented commercially bred crickets produced the same poor results. I highly suspect that the feed the suppliers used to raise their crickets had high levels of D3. Thankfully, good info on the dangers of D3 (and other fat soluble vitamins) is readily available today.

I'd love to give T. johnstonii a try again. I suspect I would do better with them now. My first pair of adults I ever had developed edemas, and I quickly figured out (pre-internet days) that stopping the dusting of the insects had positive results, at least for the adults. Unfortunately, I became too focused on pre-formed A due to the article by John Annis is the Chameleon Information Network newsletter. To his credit though, John mentioned D3 as a possible cause, but to my knowledge, a follow-up study on D3 wasn't conducted by him and the veterinarian he worked with in the vitamin A study.

In any case, little did I know that, in my experiences, the main culprit of organ malfunction/damage resulting in edema was too much D3 in the foods that were being fed to my feeders. I easily avoided edemas in other adults I purchased (mainly by limiting or eliminating the use powdered supplements), but the babies were more sensitive. I look forward to seeing everyone's progress in raising the babies. Good luck in raising the babies! Hopefully, I'll be able to afford some in the future. I remember buying johnstonii for only $50 a piece. As a teenager, especially, I thought that was a lot of money back then. :)
 

Action Jackson

Chameleon Enthusiast
Congrats! I love that species. Back in the late 80s to early 90s, I had quite a few clutches. I always had a good hatch rate. I wasn't successful raising any of them to adulthood though because their high sensitivity to vitamins, especially D3, wasn't fully realized.

I remember raising houseflies for them. At first, the babies did fine. Then I made the mistake of using powdered milk as part of the mix to feed the fly larvae. Big mistake! Even without using powdered supplements on the flies, the babies quickly developed edemas. I have little doubt that the D3 in the powdered milk was responsible. Feeding non-supplemented commercially bred crickets produced the same poor results. I highly suspect that the feed the suppliers used to raise their crickets had high levels of D3. Thankfully, good info on the dangers of D3 (and other fat soluble vitamins) is readily available today.

I'd love to give T. johnstonii a try again. I suspect I would do better with them now. My first pair of adults I ever had developed edemas, and I quickly figured out (pre-internet days) that stopping the dusting of the insects had positive results, at least for the adults. Unfortunately, I became too focused on pre-formed A due to the article by John Annis is the Chameleon Information Network newsletter. To his credit though, John mentioned D3 as a possible cause, but to my knowledge, a follow-up study on D3 wasn't conducted by him and the veterinarian he worked with in the vitamin A study.

In any case, little did I know that, in my experiences, the main culprit of organ malfunction/damage resulting in edema was too much D3 in the foods that were being fed to my feeders. I easily avoided edemas in other adults I purchased (mainly by limiting or eliminating the use powdered supplements), but the babies were more sensitive. I look forward to seeing everyone's progress in raising the babies. Good luck in raising the babies! Hopefully, I'll be able to afford some in the future. I remember buying johnstonii for only $50 a piece. As a teenager, especially, I thought that was a lot of money back then. :)
Thanks for all that good information. My adult females have some edema and I suspect it's from feeding crickets fresh from my supplier. I will definately keep what you said in mind when my babies hatch.
 

Motherlode Chameleon

Chameleon Enthusiast
Paul

Great news! Long awaited neonates from a long awaited import! With a couple fingers crossed some more clutches can hatch out and some captive bred lines could become established with the existing wild caughts.

Best Regards
Jeremy A. Rich
 
Thanks you guys! so 12 out of 12 hatched but one died shortly after. The one that died was the last to hatch, so Im assuming it used every ounce of energy it had to get completely out of the egg. It was perfectly formed though and looked just like the rest. Im pretty bummed about it.

Here are a couple more pics I took of a couple of them (some have attitude already and puff up and gape!)






I post most of my cham pics on Instagram (showjet95) fyi for anyone that enjoys pics of cool chams and dart frogs:)
 
Top Bottom