Are Hornworms Too Big??

DeShawni Green

Established Member
It could also be this but from my expirience they gape when they are too hot. Well at least mine do
I always knew they gaped when too hot, but then i noticed my cham gape when it wasnt too hot. I didnt understand why at first, but once it happened again it seemed to suggest the a large hormworm was the common factor. Again, just something I have seen and have a theory on.
 

MissSkittles

Chameleon Enthusiast
Hi. I’ll put my feedback in red.
Chameleon Info:
  • Your Chameleon - Veiled chameleon, female, 7-12 months old (prev owner not sure). I have had her for all of three days ? I'm just worried that I'll do something wrong and want to make sure she's getting the best care possible.
  • Handling - I haven't handled her since I got her, I've offered her a 'hand taxi' but she does not seem to trust me enough yet. It can take a long time before being trusted. Try starting slow with hand feeding.
  • Feeding - I'm feeding dubias and hornworms. Friday she had 7 dubias all an average of 3/4 ish in, yesterday she had 5 dubias and 2 1.5 in hornworms, today all she's had is one 4in ish hornworm as a treat since I felt bad after invadng her space to clean the floor of the enclosure. I'm currently feeding daily as I think she is still very young and needs the energy to grow. I am gut loading the dubias with kale, almond, and apple. Hornworms have their special cup stuff from Josh's frogs. Variety is the spice of a chameleons life. Attaching feeder and gutloading graphics for you.
  • Supplements - I have repticalcium and rep cal multivitamin. I am doing calcium for most of the feeds and then will do the vitamin maybe once every two weeks. She also need a calcium with D3 once every two weeks. Calcium without D3 on all feedings except the multivitamin and D3 ones.
  • Watering - I mist every 4 hours with an exo terra monsoon solo. The cycle lasts 2 minutes. I haven't seen her drink (I'm not around her all the time) but there are water drops on leaves available for her. Many chams are very secretive about drinking. I suspect it’s a veiled conspiracy to rob us of the cuteness of them drinking. ;) You could cut back on misting to 3-4 times daily but keep the same length.
  • Fecal Description - She has not been tested for parasites as I know of. I haven't found any droppings yet, but I don't know if she hasn't had any or if they arejust hidden in some of the plants in the enclosure.
  • History - I got her from someone who had to rehome because he was going to college. Hasn't laid eggs yet. She has not ever been to the vet but has iverall been healthy from what I understand. She used to eat crickets but I just switched her to dubias.

Cage Info:
  • Cage Type - 2x2x4 screen cage with cling wrap on 3 of the sides to keep humidity in.
  • Lighting - I have a linear t5 uvb bulb for uvb. Do you know the strength of the uvb bulb or when the uvb was last replaced? Most lose effectiveness after 6 months. A 5.0 uvb is recommended. Arcadia brand 6% needs be changed only yearly. I also have a combo uvb and heat bulb I am using as the heat source for now, That's what she came with but I'm looking for a new one that's just heat. Lights come on and off at 7 am and pm, respectively. I suspect the combo bulb is a mercury vapor bulb and should be removed. For basking/heat, a plain old fashioned incandescent light bulb is perfect. You could also use halogen. Just not LED as they don’t emit much heat.
  • Temperature - Cage floor is around 70 and basking spot in the higher 80s in the daytime. Bring the basking temp down to 80-82* and it’ll be perfect. At night they go off (her cage is in my finished basement which doesn't get below 60 for now -- will probably get a lower-grade heat mat or emitter for the wintertime as I live in a colder climate. A heat mat won’t do much for a cham. If your nighttime house temps get below 50-60* use a heat emitter bulb. I measure the temps with a heat gun that points a laser at a spot then tells you the temp. You should probably get a digital thermometer with a probe to get a better idea of temps as the temp gun can only measure surfaces.
  • Humidity - Humidity is around 55% when most evaporated and gets up to a little over 60% after mistings. I am creating the humidity with the mister and keeping the plastic wrap on the sides. I use a digital hygrometer to measure humidity. You need to bring down your humidity a bit. Ideal humidity for a veiled during the day is between 30-50%. At night when it’s cooler it can get as high as 100%. Heat+ high humidity can = respiratory infection. If you cut back on the frequency of your misting, this will help lower it.
  • Plants - She has 3 live plants in her enclosure - a ficus tree (which came from the previous home and seems to be her favorite) and 2 hanging pothos plants which she doesn't seem to use as much. Perfect! Veiled’s will nibble on their plants at times and these are both deemed safe. You could add more branches though. Get some branches from outside, wash with Dawn dish soap and blast well with a hose to rinse. Just avoid pine and other trees with sap.
  • Placement - The cage is located at the bottom of the basement stairs. I am a student and still live with my whole family, so there are 4 people in the house. It is not a super high traffic area but it is how everyone gets into the basement (my dad works from home downstairs on weekdays, but his office is in the opposite side of the basement. My brother and I will go to hang out/ play video games via these stairs. I'd say it is a medium-low traffic area as we spend most of our time upstairs. The top of the cage is probably 6ft off the ground. As long as she is higher than the people, a little traffic should be ok. Chams like to be able to look down upon us and their world...makes them feel safe.
  • Location - I am in Massachusetts. Ahh...my beautiful Mass...how I miss it.
  • There are a few great resources for learning more about your chameleon.
  • Check out Neptune The Chameleon on YouTube.
  • Another invaluable resource is https://chameleonacademy.com/ You can also access the chameleon breeder podcasts there which are super informative.
    And of course, there’s here. Feel free to ask whatever questions you may have. We all learn from each other. :)

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