Applesauce?

edub2017

New Member
A few weeks ago i thought of a crafty way to increase the nutiritonal content of a few feeders, here's what i did. I bought some organic apple/sweetpotato sauce (ingredients: organic apples, orgainc sweetpoatatoes, water) mixed in a little bit of gutload and calcium powder. I then dipped about two thirds of a hornworm--the exception being the head-- into the mixture. The mixture was very pasty and stuck very well to the worm, though he was mostly immobile....obviously. I then presented the worm to my chameleon on a spoon. He quickly devoured it, leaving no trace of the residue behind. Within a couple of days i was able to spoon feed the sauce to him without the worm. I was wondering what you guys thought of this method, or if their were any reason i should discontinue using it--i feed him the mixture twice a week. I figured the added moisture and natural vitamins could only help, but i have been wrong before. :D
 

Frank Castle

New Member
Candy Coated Worms for the Chams. LOL. To me (my opinion) sound more like a treat. I am not sure what the chams nutrinal needs are when if comes to The apple sauce and sweet potatos, but getting that calcium and gutload in it may be a good Idea. My only concern would be the extra Carbohydrates from the applesauce, and the Starch from the sweet potato. I know chams need fat and protien, but I am not sure what the effects of those other components may be. I am interested in what others have to say on this. Some one elses insight that is better knowlegeable on Chams Nutritional needs.

Frank
 

Jam

New Member
I can't give any scientific studies or info on it -- only experiences. But hermie pretty much lived on applesauce and other baby foods for a couple weeks while he was sick and no longer wanted worms. We would put it in a 1 cc syringe, and put a little blob on his nose, he would lick it off and eventually just open his mouth for you to deposit some in there, swallow and then pop his mouth open for more.

Since he's been sick this time around he's started doing the same thing.

By choice I wouldn't let it replace regular feeders, but if Hermie lived on the stuff while sick and then got better, it can't be too bad for them?
 

lowendfrequency

New Member
Chameleons do not eat fruit in the wild. They do not have the ability to process the high sugar content. Continuing to feed fruits will most likely damage the good bacteria present in a chams digestive system.

I realize that as chameleon keepers we're all constantly learning, but come on guys. If you have any compassion for these animals then please don't experiment on them.
 
lowendfrequency said:
Chameleons do not eat fruit in the wild. They do not have the ability to process the high sugar content. Continuing to feed fruits will most likely damage the good bacteria present in a chams digestive system.

I realize that as chameleon keepers we're all constantly learning, but come on guys. If you have any compassion for these animals then please don't experiment on them.
I agree, i would just stick to the basics
 

edub2017

New Member
lowendfrequency said:
Chameleons do not eat fruit in the wild. They do not have the ability to process the high sugar content. Continuing to feed fruits will most likely damage the good bacteria present in a chams digestive system.

I realize that as chameleon keepers we're all constantly learning, but come on guys. If you have any compassion for these animals then please don't experiment on them.

Chameleons don't consume hornworms in the wild either. Almost everything we feed chameleons besides hissing roaches are not native to their enviorns. Insects none-the-less, but veildes eat vegitaiton native to their areas, couldn't the same argument be made?
 

Jason

New Member
Yes, veiled consume vegetation in the wild. This consists mostly of flowers and leaves. The feeding a fruit to calyptratus is a captive practice that really only has it's basis in the fact the they WILL eat it, not that they should. There are many of us who believe that these animals are not equipped to process the large amounts of natural sugars and starches in fruit as there is no evidence that these items are consumed in the wild. I guess my question would be, what are you trying to accomplish by doing this?
 

edub2017

New Member
AS A SUPPLEMENT,to help with hydration and increased vitamin content. Namely, vitamin A, which is crucial but often lacking in captive diets.

Anyway, I will discontinue use until my next vet visit, so i can speak with a professional.
 
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Jason

New Member
edub2017 said:
AS A SUPPLEMENT,to help with hydration and increased vitamin content. Namely, vitamin A, which is crucial but often lacking in captive diets.

Anyway, I will discontinue use until my next vet visit, so i can speak with a professional.

Applesauce on it's oown contains little to no vitamin A, sweet potato added to the mix does provide beta carotene but no preformed vitamin A. Recent research has suggeted that chameleons may not be able to efficiently process beta carotene into usable vitamin A. In addition to this the small amounts of moisture in relation to the high sugar and starch content will have little effect on hydration.

I applaud you for thinking outside the box and trying something new, but I'm afraid that in this case you'd probably be much better served by offering the applesauce to your feeders instead of directly to your cham.
 
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