what´s the reason.

leedragon

Chameleon Enthusiast
What is the reason Jacksons born in captivity looks so dull compared to their wc parents. I see often Jacksons which are born of Beautiful wc parents that end up with skew horns/ crooked horns, and dull colors?
 

JacksJill

Moderator
Staff member
If I was going to ask someone that question I would probably ask you. If I was going to throw out a guess it would probably lack natural sunlight or something lacking in their diet. Do you have a theory?
 

leedragon

Chameleon Enthusiast
If I was going to ask someone that question I would probably ask you. If I was going to throw out a guess it would probably lack natural sunlight or something lacking in their diet. Do you have a theory?

I have a couple of thought none with really basis. But one is the diet. specifically I thought of snails. They seem to love them when offered to them, but it seem that really few offers them snails. One other is the phisically stimulance of the horns. I read a thread here many years ago like 2008, where a merumontanus had developed crooked horns, the oner made a sort of braces for the horns with a bit of plastic tube. it ended up making them straight again after a period of using them. Now the chameleons seem many times to sleep pushing agains something, the net on the roof or the glass in a corner or something else. if this stimulans of their horns being pushed for 8 hour while they sleep has something to do with it. If the plants in the terrarium reach all the way up and the chameleon climbs to the top to sleep it will be pushing its horn towards the roof. But perhaps is something totally different.
 

JacksJill

Moderator
Staff member
I recently got a wild caught male and he is 1 1/2 times the size of my CB male and has long straight horns. My avatar came bent up at the tip but grew straight from then on. The most significant difference in my husbandry from that of his breeder was that I got him out in an outdoor cage on weekends. My cage was probably larger than what he had as a juvenile and I do feed snails occasionally. Later in his life I added bee pollen to his diet.
 

leedragon

Chameleon Enthusiast
I recently got a wild caught male and he is 1 1/2 times the size of my CB male and has long straight horns. My avatar came bent up at the tip but grew straight from then on. The most significant difference in my husbandry from that of his breeder was that I got him out in an outdoor cage on weekends. My cage was probably larger than what he had as a juvenile and I do feed snails occasionally. Later in his life I added bee pollen to his diet.
cool, then it could actually be something about those things. Yeah I saw a male/ males jacksonii jacksonii at Hamm that looked bigger than your regular jacksonii jacksonii, bigger than the one I had. Pretty damn cool. perhaps there is a sub populations of larger ones or just that all that space makes them use his body more and promote growth. r they are just older then the cb we have.
 

JacksJill

Moderator
Staff member
One more thing to consider is seasonal variation in their colors. Males probably don't do much mating in the certain months. They may have a natural hormone drop just like male panthers.
 

leedragon

Chameleon Enthusiast
One more thing to consider is seasonal variation in their colors. Males probably don't do much mating in the certain months. They may have a natural hormone drop just like male panthers.
could be, and they meet other males now and then which probably stimulates hormons. maybe one should let the males go at eachother in a controlled matter to stimulate their hormons and natural behavior.
 
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JacksJill

Moderator
Staff member
They probably only need glimpses of other males for that kind of stimulation. I'm not willing to risk it.
I think it is more the change of seasons that really sets up their hormones. I know being equatorial the changes aren't drastic but there must be some variation, could even be by rainy season.
 

leedragon

Chameleon Enthusiast
They probably only need glimpses of other males for that kind of stimulation. I'm not willing to risk it.
I think it is more the change of seasons that really sets up their hormones. I know being equatorial the changes aren't drastic but there must be some variation, could even be by rainy season.
probably more sunny or somewhat more Daylight aswell. maybe I Think i read somewhere either here or in chameleonnews ( which btw should release a new issue soon, it has really been a while) that keep their Jacksons together in spring in a greenhouse. I Think it was sticky farm tounges if I recall correctly. I don´t Think that letting them sparr eachother for a minu or few seconds could manage to injure them. but who knows. maybe letting them see eachother as you say could be enough.
 

JacksJill

Moderator
Staff member
"Chameleon's in the Garden" has some anecdotal interactions observed by a homeowner in Hawaii. It might shed some light on things. It is beautifully illustrated.
 
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