WC Feeders

JackP308

Established Member
Should I ID every WC bug before I feed. I was walking through a heavily wooded area and streams the last few days since it has warmed up. Collecting different tree barks and other river wood and driftwoods. I also seen a bunch of cool insects Id imagine my geckos and chameleons would gobble up. Im not to worried about pesticides in these areas as much as some being toxic bugs or unhealthy?

For people that feed WC bugs do you already know what you are looking for or do you catch a bunch of whatever you find and ID them. making sure its healthy to eat. I know bright caterpillars and bugs like that probably should be avoided. Any tips on going about feeding wc insects is appreciated. Thanks

would you feed a few wc bugs w/ the usual or stick to strictly commercial feeders?
 

jdog1027

Established Member
I personally now always stick to 'commercial feeders' as opposed to wild caught. I know that in theory, wild chameleons eat wild insects, so it's a toss. I lost a male Jackson once to what I am almost 100% certain was a contaminated feeder katydid. He was fine that evening and dead on the branch the next morning. At very least, I would try to research your local flora and fauna and become familiar with what is indigenous to Ohio. Not only pesticides, but parasites are also something to worry about when it comes to wild collected insects. I know alot of very experienced keepers on here collect wild insects with excellent results in regards to the health of their chameleons.
 
In last few year or so, I've started to raising my own non-commercial feeders. And I've noticed change in appetite and growth. Sometimes a little too much in the appetite dept. as seen in the photo.

Always reseach and ID the bugs you collect. Everything in moderation.
 
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jojackson

New Member
Commercially bred insects can also carry parasites, less likely but it happens.
Pesticides are a greater concern imo. A healthy animal is not likely to have issues with parasites in wc bugs, sick or debilitated animals, or those kept in sub optimal conditions
are another story.
You can gutload wc bugs with your usual gutload for a week if you like, after which if there is anything in its gut thats harmful is well and truely gone, and if theres any pesticide poisoning, the bugs will be dead anyway (dont feed). (almost foolproof)
Ofcourse this negates the quality of natural gut content in wc insects.
Some insects may absorb heavy metals etc but thats a discussion for another day.

Any wc bugs come with certain risk, aka they move, so you cant be sure where they came from (pesticide sprayed area). Collection from areas as far from pollution as possible is common sense. Its a hotly debated subject and will likely continue to be so.

Best advice? If in doubt, dont! It's your lizard/s. :)

Everything in moderation.
Bravo!
 

Hugh Wahl

New Member
In last few year or so, I've started to raising my own non-commercial feeders. And I've noticed change in appetite and growth. Sometimes a little too much in the appetite dept. as seen in the photo.

Always reseach and ID the bugs you collect. Everything in moderation.
Damn that's a mouth full. Lol :eek:
 
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