Vet over video call?

ssc97

Member
it is a bit too shallow. You want one of the tubs like in the graphic I included above for the lay bin. You want 5-6 inches of sand in it.

Thanks. I just ordered one on Amazon with the play sand also and should arrive tomorrow.

Don't really have any other choice but is it ok for her to be going to the vet's tomorrow or is this something that ideally is checked out ASAP? Frustrating the vet couldn't accommodate her this evening.
 

Beman

Chameleon Enthusiast
Thanks. I just ordered one on Amazon with the play sand also and should arrive tomorrow.

Don't really have any other choice but is it ok for her to be going to the vet's tomorrow or is this something that ideally is checked out ASAP? Frustrating the vet couldn't accommodate her this evening.
This is one of those things where time matters. Not having a lay bin now can matter. It would be one thing if you could run to home depot to get the tub and the playsand today to get it set up today and see if she starts laying before you try to get her into the vet. But the longer she is holding eggs that she needs to lay the more dangerous it gets. The only thing the vet could do is maybe give her a shot to induce laying and an xray. If they are a very experienced reptile vet they might suggest spaying and removing the eggs while they are at it. But not all females survive this surgery either.

This is why I was saying proper lay bin today like this morning go get the stuff get it in and put her down in it to see if she starts. Because if she starts to lay you can push the vet appointment until she is done. They would then do an xray to ensure she laid the entire clutch.
 

ssc97

Member
This is one of those things where time matters. Not having a lay bin now can matter. It would be one thing if you could run to home depot to get the tub and the playsand today to get it set up today and see if she starts laying before you try to get her into the vet. But the longer she is holding eggs that she needs to lay the more dangerous it gets. The only thing the vet could do is maybe give her a shot to induce laying and an xray. If they are a very experienced reptile vet they might suggest spaying and removing the eggs while they are at it. But not all females survive this surgery either.

This is why I was saying proper lay bin today like this morning go get the stuff get it in and put her down in it to see if she starts. Because if she starts to lay you can push the vet appointment until she is done. They would then do an xray to ensure she laid the entire clutch.
Ok. It's unfortunately 7pm here so I can't get to the vet. Not ideal, I know. I'm dropping her off at the vet's first thing tomorrow morning and I'm going to go straight from there to pick up everything she needs after. Hopefully it's enough... only about 14 hours until her appt..
 

Beman

Chameleon Enthusiast
Ok. It's unfortunately 7pm here so I can't get to the vet. Not ideal, I know. I'm dropping her off at the vet's first thing tomorrow morning and I'm going to go straight from there to pick up everything she needs after. Hopefully it's enough... only about 14 hours until her appt..
Ok sorry I keep forgetting your in a different time zone then I am. When I think tomorrow I think of a long time because it is still morning here lol.
 

ssc97

Member
Ok sorry I keep forgetting your in a different time zone then I am. When I think tomorrow I think of a long time because it is still morning here lol.
Ah lol fair enough. Well hopefully 12 hours isn’t going to make a huge difference..
 

Beman

Chameleon Enthusiast
Ah lol fair enough. Well hopefully 12 hours isn’t going to make a huge difference..
Hopefully not. And since she is sleeping anyways not like you can do a lot tonight with the lay bin. Please let us know what happens with the vet. Make sure they are focusing on xray and figuring out if this is related to needing to lay that clutch... With your husbandry and the looks of her that is what I am leaning towards as being the issue.
 

ssc97

Member
Hopefully not. And since she is sleeping anyways not like you can do a lot tonight with the lay bin. Please let us know what happens with the vet. Make sure they are focusing on xray and figuring out if this is related to needing to lay that clutch... With your husbandry and the looks of her that is what I am leaning towards as being the issue.
Yes i spoke to the receptionist she said the vet is absolutely going to X-ray her. I heard the Cham scratching in the cage earlier so hopefully it is the right time for treatment. She’s been much more lively today and don’t think she took any day time naps (still 1 eye closed but otherwise right eye open) so i am hoping that’s somewhat a positive
 

Beman

Chameleon Enthusiast
Yes i spoke to the receptionist she said the vet is absolutely going to X-ray her. I heard the Cham scratching in the cage earlier so hopefully it is the right time for treatment. She’s been much more lively today and don’t think she took any day time naps (still 1 eye closed but otherwise right eye open) so i am hoping that’s somewhat a positive
eye issue can be linked to supplement issues. Or infection.
 

ssc97

Member
Dropped her off at the vet's this morning. Waiting to hear back from them - fingers crossed. Vet said they'd feel her belly and depending on the condition they would do an x-ray or ultrasound (depending on whether they think she's eggbound or has follicular stasis). They said if her eggs have hard shells they'll inject calcium / oxy up to 3x and if its follicular stasis / other issues they will do a surgery. Does that sound about right to you all?

They seem a lot more knowledgable than the other vet but not taking my chances anymore given the last experience.
 

ssc97

Member
Tough news, she unfortunately has follicular stasis - vet did the ultrasound and seems very certain. They are moving for her surgery on Friday morning.
 

ssc97

Member
Vet is suggesting we bring her home today and bring her back to the clinic on Friday. Other option is they can keep her there but don't recommend it. Do you guys think that's the best idea? It's about a 20 min drive each way and I don't think she loves being transported
 

Beman

Chameleon Enthusiast
Hopefully you have a dark box with a stick pushed through you can put her in for the drive. This way it is dark and it will stress her the least amount.

It definitely sounds like they know chams but we have now gone outside my level of experience.

I am going to tag another member in. She has had her chams spayed and understands the after care and may be able to give you a better idea of what to expect. @jannb the vet is spaying her female veiled due to follicular stasis. They do not live in the US. Can you please help them with what they need to expect and any changes in care when they bring her home?
 

ssc97

Member
Hopefully you have a dark box with a stick pushed through you can put her in for the drive. This way it is dark and it will stress her the least amount.

It definitely sounds like they know chams but we have now gone outside my level of experience.

I am going to tag another member in. She has had her chams spayed and understands the after care and may be able to give you a better idea of what to expect. @jannb the vet is spaying her female veiled due to follicular stasis. They do not live in the US. Can you please help them with what they need to expect and any changes in care when they bring her home?

Thanks. Yes we have a box with a stick for transport and we put a hot water bottle in (wrapped around soft fabric) so she stays warm during transport. We've transported her like that before and she seems ok.

Vet we spoke to said she's been working with exotics for over 25 years and did the same surgery to a bearded dragon last week (successfully). She said its not 100% success rate (obviously), but more make it rather than not, so I'm really hoping she pulls through well.

I spoke to the vet again and I think they can provide better care in the surgery than we can at home. They are administering her fluids and the nurse is keeping an eye on her. Her eyes are pretty much shut regardless. I think in case something shocking were to happen, they can react quicker (and likely more effectively) than we can at home. Just my two cents but happy to be corrected if someone else has an opinion.
 

Beman

Chameleon Enthusiast
Thanks. Yes we have a box with a stick for transport and we put a hot water bottle in (wrapped around soft fabric) so she stays warm during transport. We've transported her like that before and she seems ok.

Vet we spoke to said she's been working with exotics for over 25 years and did the same surgery to a bearded dragon last week (successfully). She said its not 100% success rate (obviously), but more make it rather than not, so I'm really hoping she pulls through well.

I spoke to the vet again and I think they can provide better care in the surgery than we can at home. They are administering her fluids and the nurse is keeping an eye on her. Her eyes are pretty much shut regardless. I think in case something shocking were to happen, they can react quicker (and likely more effectively) than we can at home. Just my two cents but happy to be corrected if someone else has an opinion.
How cold is it where you live? Unless it is cold like lower then 50 I would not use the hot water bottle.

So they are going to keep her until the surgery or provide after care? It sounds like they do know reptiles. But like you said this is a risky surgery. Either way she needs to be taken care of and from what you have said about this Vet I would feel comfortable trusting them.
 

ssc97

Member
How cold is it where you live? Unless it is cold like lower then 50 I would not use the hot water bottle.

So they are going to keep her until the surgery or provide after care? It sounds like they do know reptiles. But like you said this is a risky surgery. Either way she needs to be taken care of and from what you have said about this Vet I would feel comfortable trusting them.

It varies but like a day like today it is probably right at 50 or slightly below -especially with wind chill.

They are keeping her until the surgery. Unfortunately as they're doing Friday surgery, so that means they won't be around overthe weekend and there's a national holiday on Monday. Not ideal for her. So the idea is they will do the surgery first thing Fri morning then they will keep an eye on her all day Friday and we will pick her up end of the day. It would have been nice for her to be in their care a few days after the surgery but unfortunately they simply won't be in so it's not an option. They said they'd be in touch after the surgery to discuss results / any care.

Would be good to have an idea of how to prepare of course beforehand in case there's anything missing that I should buy in prep for Friday
 

jannb

Chameleon Enthusiast
Don’t feed her after midnight before surgery. You should make a hospital bin just incase you need it. My vet has me drop off my girls early morning the day of surgery. He normally keeps them over night and makes sure they are eating and drinking before they come home. My girls are able to return to their normal free range when they come home. My girls had stitches that dissolved in about a month and the first few weeks I try to keep them as dry as possible. Getting them to wet can cause them to dissolve to early. I would ask the vet how many times they have successfully done this surgery? Please keep us posted on how she does.
 

ssc97

Member
Do t feed here after midnight before surgery. You should make a hospital bin just incase you need it. My vet has me drop off my girls early morning the day of surgery. He normally keeps them over night and makes sure they are eating and drinking before they come home. My girls are able to return to their normal free range when they come home. My girls had stitches that dissolved in about a month and the first few weeks I try to keep them as dry as possible. Getting them to wet can cause them to dissolve to early. I would ask the bet how many times they have successfully done this surgery? Please keep us posted on how she does.

Thanks. She's with the vet right now until her surgery Friday morning. How should I make a hospital bin?

Unfortunately they are doing the surgery on Friday morning and aren't open Saturday - Monday (Monday due to a national holiday). I would have preferred they keep her to monitor, but I think we will have to. What signs should we be looking for?

How do you keep the chams dry with mistings? Do you just try to mist around them / the plants?

I asked the vet how many times she's done it and she wouldn't give me a straight answer but said she's been doing it for over 20 years and that she did this exact surgery successfully on a bearded dragon last week so I hope that means that they are experienced enough but of course complications do happen and it isn't 100%. Currently hoping for the best but expecting the worst basically
 
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