Veiled Lady has become ill out of blue

CamoChameleonsHuman

Chameleon Enthusiast
Please be aware that sunken eyes do NOT always indicate dehydration! Forcing water on a sick chameleon can do more harm than good. It can be dehydration, but there are many instances where chameleons are ill and unfortunately on their way out when their eyes sink in. In any case, it is a bad sign.
I wasn't advising force feeding or forced hydration. But the shower method is at least something to try if hydration could be a factor. If she is as you describe as "too far gone" than what's the harm?
 
Please be aware that sunken eyes do NOT always indicate dehydration! Forcing water on a sick chameleon can do more harm than good. It can be dehydration, but there are many instances where chameleons are ill and unfortunately on their way out when their eyes sink in. In any case, it is a bad sign.

:C I am getting ready to take her to the vet this morning, hopefully with some injections and medicines she will bounce back as fast as she fell down. It all happened so rapid, last week she was so bright and plump, she had belly rolls that were oh so cute. And then, bam. Stopped eating. Started sleeping during day. Stopped drinking 2 days ago. Her coloring still has moments of being a good color but still very dull. Vaguely black with polka dots coming through, and very skinny now.
I did not think the eyes being sunk in were from dehydration myself, as her urates are still very white. My gut is telling me it is a parasite but hopefully in a couple hours we will have the answer and the remedies!!
Although her eyes are sunk, she's still on her perch, has not fell off her vines at all or stumbled or too weak to lift herself up. Her grip is still mighty in her back legs, even pricked me yesterday by gripping so hard. I know she is strong enough to make it through this.
Thank you for your reply ! Very good to preach because many people think sunk eyes always means dehydration.
 
I wasn't advising force feeding or forced hydration. But the shower method is at least something to try if hydration could be a factor. If she is as you describe as "too far gone" than what's the harm?

Nothing is too far gone until it is gone. Her eyes may be sunk in and her appetite diminished but I would not say she has been given a death sentence (unless I do not get her treatment of course) she has alot of strength and fight in her.
 
Hey all yall that are still watching this, I have a question about the vet - what is the best way to transport a chameleon? When healthy I would probably just carry her on my person, but I am not doing that with her in her current state.
Can I use a cat carrier and prop a stick in it? Should the box or carrier be misted at all? I feadcsomething about taking a bottle of hot water and wrapping it in a towel, I'm assuming that is to create humidity in the small space, would yall recommend doing this? Or is there a simpler way? The ride to vet is 15 minutes or so.
 
Hey all yall that are still watching this, I have a question about the vet - what is the best way to transport a chameleon? When healthy I would probably just carry her on my person, but I am not doing that with her in her current state.
Can I use a cat carrier and prop a stick in it? Should the box or carrier be misted at all? I feadcsomething about taking a bottle of hot water and wrapping it in a towel, I'm assuming that is to create humidity in the small space, would yall recommend doing this? Or is there a simpler way? The ride to vet is 15 minutes or so.

And if it means much, I live in Georgia and it has been raining yesterday and this morning so humidity should be high today as the sun rises. Right now it's slightly chilly but will increase to high 70s shortly
 

jamest0o0

Chameleon Enthusiast
Put her in a dark box with something to perch on. That's always the best way to transport them.

No one intends to be negative, it's just we've all seen hundreds of chameleons like this, where the owner said they got sick out of nowhere and then start to make a turn around only to drop off out of nowhere. Just want to be realistic about the situation, no reason to not be optimistic and try everything though.

Did you say you had glass in Georgia? Humidity shouldn't be high during the day. I mentioned that above. I don't think that's the cause for your current problem, but just pointing out an adjust to make. Warm+low humidity(day), cool and high humidity(at night)
 
Put her in a dark box with something to perch on. That's always the best way to transport them.

No one intends to be negative, it's just we've all seen hundreds of chameleons like this, where the owner said they got sick out of nowhere and then start to make a turn around only to drop off out of nowhere. Just want to be realistic about the situation, no reason to not be optimistic and try everything though.

Did you say you had glass in Georgia? Humidity shouldn't be high during the day. I mentioned that above. I don't think that's the cause for your current problem, but just pointing out an adjust to make. Warm+low humidity(day), cool and high humidity(at night)

Thank you for the humidity tip! That is something I did not know, I was under the impression the humidity should always try to be at the same level and around 65-70 or so percent, never going under 50. If I can ask, what level do you keep your humidity at during day and night? (I'm assuming you have a chameleon or multiple)
 

jamest0o0

Chameleon Enthusiast
Yup, humidity should swing not stay the same. You want watering times to be cool only to dry out and heat up after. For this reason I mist heavy in the morning before lights are on and at night when they just shut off. I have a montane species chameleon at the moment, so my watering is more intense with higher humidity. For you, 5min+ misting morning and at night would be good, that can be adjusted a little based off your humidity. You'll want about 30-50% ambient humidity during the day. At night have it go up to 70%+
 
Well, we are back from the vet. I would love to say it went great but it felt like a waste of time, when I called they told me they had experience, but upon arriving it was obvious they did not. They were very quick to see us, accommodating, and friendly, but the veterinarian did not have special training into chameleons at all. If they would of been honest I could of used the day driving 2 hours to a real reptilian vet.
All that being said, she and I agreed it did not seem like an egg related issue. And she felt that it was not MBD. Seeing how weak and miserable my baby is though I really would have appreciated an injection of fluids/nutrients/calcium maybe - but she was not experienced enough to feel comfortable doing any of those. Hopefully they will still be helpful when it comes to the fecal though, which I think will defi Italy shed some much needed lights. And if it comes back positive they can get me the medication necessary to rid her of the life sucking invaders!! I feel so horrible for her, they really do go down hill fast when they are sick.
The fecal I had was 48 hrs old so they wanted a fresher sample. I did manage to get quite a bit of sweet potatoe mush and water into her belly while at the vet so once that passed threw her we will have our answers!! I really hope.
If the fecal comes back negative (which is really really doubt) tomorrow is Saturday and I will spend the day driving to Atlanta to a vet who really does know exotic creatures.
 

jamest0o0

Chameleon Enthusiast
Well, we are back from the vet. I would love to say it went great but it felt like a waste of time, when I called they told me they had experience, but upon arriving it was obvious they did not. They were very quick to see us, accommodating, and friendly, but the veterinarian did not have special training into chameleons at all. If they would of been honest I could of used the day driving 2 hours to a real reptilian vet.
All that being said, she and I agreed it did not seem like an egg related issue. And she felt that it was not MBD. Seeing how weak and miserable my baby is though I really would have appreciated an injection of fluids/nutrients/calcium maybe - but she was not experienced enough to feel comfortable doing any of those. Hopefully they will still be helpful when it comes to the fecal though, which I think will defi Italy shed some much needed lights. And if it comes back positive they can get me the medication necessary to rid her of the life sucking invaders!! I feel so horrible for her, they really do go down hill fast when they are sick.
The fecal I had was 48 hrs old so they wanted a fresher sample. I did manage to get quite a bit of sweet potatoe mush and water into her belly while at the vet so once that passed threw her we will have our answers!! I really hope.
If the fecal comes back negative (which is really really doubt) tomorrow is Saturday and I will spend the day driving to Atlanta to a vet who really does know exotic creatures.

Sorry to hear that. If it's a parasite, it's probably coccidia, which would still probably be plentiful in a 48 hour sample.
 
So, today is the shi//iest day. Reptar is still alive but just barely, im shocked she made it through the night. She finally moved down off her vines and is resting on a moist warm towel I placed in bottom of tank. I've moved her outside for real sun and heat, humidity today is 75 naturally and the temp is 81 naturally. I feel like scum of the earth that I have failed her so bad.

I took her to vet yesterday, laid 100 dollars and all they did was oo and aww at her like it was a fu**ring zoo. They literally turned it into a photo shoot. Told me to take her home and force feed mushed up vegetables.

I dropped off her fecal yesterday 2 hrs before closing and they never called, I called this morning and was told she's call me back when she gets in at 930. She didn't and I called at 1015 being patient, I understand vets are busy and the world is not revolving around one sick animal. But was again told she is with another patient and will call back, its 1130 now -.- the receptionist said "her fecal appears to be negative but I'll have her call you back" i feel they either did not know how to run and effectively look for invaders in reptile / chameleon fecal or just really dont give a sh**. The fact I've called multiple times and she hasn't called to simply tell me the results pisses me off. It's been an accumulative 8 hours between yesterday and today (counting their hours of operation)

I've called over 10 local vets, and they all reference me to Auburn university ER. I called and they sound great and confident, and I know they are because I took my pit bull there when he got shot in the head and he is still happy and alive today because of them. HOWEVER it is 170$ yes 170 just to be seen, just to walk into the building or schedule an appointment. On the weekends prices are almost doubled and many things are limited. They only have one exotic veterinarian who is off site but on call, I left a description of Reptars condition and history and the receptionist said she will call him and HE will decide if I can bring my baby in today, i mean i can bring her there all I want but without the doctor there its ultimately useless. Auburn is a 2 hour drive from my home. And I have 300$ to my name. My family has told me they are not spending money on a sick lizard, that there is always "reptar #2"

I am willing to pay the 170 to be seen, drive 2 hours there and back, but with 130 to spare on any tests, injections, medicines, I feel I'll have to pick and choose which to do and pray I pick wisely.
I need another fecal from someone who knows what they are doing and what to look for. And I imagine a couple to a few vital injections. From experience, how much do you think these tests/meds run in an ER?

I'm soaking her in a 1/2 water 1/2 pedialyte solution twice a day for 15 + minutes at a time. And force feeding mushed up sweet potatoes from baby food jar, organic, purely sweet potatoe and water. I've rush ordered ReptiAid Herbal Solution for parasite and bacterial infections that many people have reviewed as INCREDIBLE when it comes to chameleons who wont eat drink are weak lethargic etc. It will not be here until tomorrow morning and I cannot find it locally.

I feel like the cure is at hand reach but it's a hologram that I cant a totally grasp.
 

jamest0o0

Chameleon Enthusiast
I really think if shes as bad as it sounds, there's not much you can do. For animals like these to show symptoms means it's *really* bad and many times irreversible. Do you have pictures? You shouldn't be soaking her in anything. Force feeding vegetables to me seems pointless and stressful. Honestly some of this stuff sounds like it will only make it worse for her. I don't blame you because it sounds like your vet gave you bad advice. Let me link some others off the top of my head who may have some more info

@JacksJill
@Brodybreaux25
@Matt Vanilla Gorilla
 
Edit: Auburn just called me back and gave me a ball park number that includes various test and injections of around 250 - 300. So I'm off to Auburn with every penny I have!
 
I will add I know it is not a guarantee she will get better, and I've been weighing the options heavily, and I just feel, money can always be replaced. I can tell she's fighting to hang on so I'm going to fight too. I'm not going in expecting her to make a full recovery, I'm aware she may very well pass on the way there or after. But, my 300 will probably be used on something way less important if I dont use it to try and help her, either way it will feel like a waste in the end if she dies, so aeast I'll feel less guilt knowing I tried everything I truly could. Wish her luck! Will show photos when I get back, just too busy right now.
 
Hey yall!! So we are back from the exotic doctor. He said it did not look at all like MBD or that she has any signs of starting MBD. or a respiratory infection. So he looked into her intestines and dived into her fecal!! He found that she had an extremely high amount of a certain bacteria that is normally present in a healthy chameleon, but when it gets high it causes distress and problems, and was the core of what is wrong with Reptars appetite lethargy sunken eyes etc. He said once this bacteria (I cant recall name of it) got out of balance, the coccidia protozoa followed suit and began increasing as well. But the coccidia is not at a huge increase, but is above normal.
He started her on flukers repta boost at 1.2 cc a day, and prescribed her sulfa/trimethoprim oral suspension .02 ml. Once a day for 7 days. Said she should have energy back or at least ne noticeably improving after 48 hours.

On the way home she did spit up some of the repta boost, not surprised, it was quit a good amount to ingest. Some came out of her nostrils but just a tiny amount. She is resting on the bottom of her tank but still alive and full of the proper medicine finally.

He said her environment was not hot enough and led to the increase on gut bacteria? I told him I keep it between 75 and 85 and drop to 60ish at night, he said to put it at 85 90 at day and 75 at night, that I should not turn off her heat at night, which j always have and she has always seemed to appreciate, she has always just seemed more content at a lower temp. But I will follow his directions as I definitely dont want this to happen again.

Will be picking up her new much larger and air ventilated vertical enclosure tomorrow C: and the reptiaid will be arriving as well, which I may still give her a dose of to help the other medicine and nutrients along.
 
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