uvb

ferretinmyshoes

Veterinarian
Staff member
The number correlates to concentration of UVB and the options are to try to mimic the natural environment. 2.0 is the lowest concentration and is for animals that normally live on the forest floor or in really dense forested regions where sunlight doesn't penetrate very well. 5.0 is for tropical species like chams where there is a moderate amount of sunlight filtering through the trees since chams would live within the trees under the canopy but not so far down as the forest floor (except for pygs). And 10.0 is for animals with almost constant exposure to sunlight, like desert animals or those in open areas that don't have trees to filter any sunlight.

5.0 is recommended for chams because it fits their environment better than the other 2 options. 2.0 is not enough UVB. 10.0 is more than they would usually see. Chams can get burned from too much UVB, just like we can although it's typically from heat sources that we see it. I don't know the extent of the detrimental effects that are possible, but since we are trying to mimic their natural environment as much as we can to enrich their captive lives I always use 5.0 since it's what they are adapted for. :)
 

Samcham1

New Member
Ok, thanks. I went to get a bulb and they were out of 5.0, I told the guy my cage was 3 1/2 feet tall and he said a 10.0 would work because the cham would have to be within 12" of the 5.0 for it to be effective. I told him I offered a 5.0.
 

ferretinmyshoes

Veterinarian
Staff member
If you put the UVB farther away I think it would have the same effect as using a 5.0...but I'm not entirely sure about this. I'm sure you could find more info on this concept if you did a search for it, it's come up before.
 

mwebb

Member
10.0

if you go to zoomeds sit they recommend a 10.0 if you use a screen cage becuse the screen acts as a filter.
 
If you put the UVB farther away I think it would have the same effect as using a 5.0...

This is correct.

The 10.0 will have twice the UVB output that the 5.0 does.

If you double the distance from lamp to the highest area in the cage where your cham basks, he will not be getting half of the UVB, but only 1/4 of it (inverse square law). A UVB meter is your friend here.
 

Chris Jury

New Member
Generally agreed with the above, but for sake of clarity, the 2.0, 5.0, 10.0, etc. designations are the supposed percentage of the total light output of the bulb that falls within the UVB band. If all bulbs had equivalent output, this would tell us something very useful, but they don't. For instance, 10% of x and 5% of 2x are, in fact, the same UV intensity. For the animals, the UV intensity is what is important, not the percentage of total light output that is UVB. As such, these designations are *very* rough guides as to the bulbs' output.

Based on the data I've seen from testing, and my own and other's experience either a 5.0 or 10.0 of common brands is fine IMHO, provided that the animal can regulate exposure to the light. With either bulb I'd be sure the animal can get within at least 12", if not 6" of the bulb, but also can get several feet away, and be in the shade. Choices for the animal is the key.

cj
 

javsto

New Member
aside from uvb bulbs, what do you think about ceramic emitters in regards to heating the reptile in question. I was on a different website looking for habitat supplies and i came upon this youtube vid where they discuss the advantages of a ceramic emitter over an incandescent bulb. I will try to post a link so you can see for yourself and express your opinions.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fAFZOgL5aDA&feature=player_embedded

this second link is to the thermostat that is mentioned in the above video

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JU-iK7aeBPQ&feature=player_embedded
 

Julirs

New Member
aside from uvb bulbs, what do you think about ceramic emitters in regards to heating the reptile in question. I was on a different website looking for habitat supplies and i came upon this youtube vid where they discuss the advantages of a ceramic emitter over an incandescent bulb. I will try to post a link so you can see for yourself and express your opinions.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fAFZOgL5aDA&feature=player_embedded

this second link is to the thermostat that is mentioned in the above video

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JU-iK7aeBPQ&feature=player_embedded

I would never use a ceramic heat emitter for a chameleon unless I was trying to warm a cage at night. These animals associate white light with basking heat, and you want to provide a light environment during the daytime. Now-for tortoises-I use them.
 

javsto

New Member
so you would use one at night in place of the blue/red night light for better heating, especially during cold winter periods? Thats where I was leading because im planning on keeping the cage in my bedroom, either on a small table next to my bed or across the room but i dont know how bright the "nighttime" heating element is.
 

kaylie

New Member
so you would use one at night in place of the blue/red night light for better heating, especially during cold winter periods? Thats where I was leading because im planning on keeping the cage in my bedroom, either on a small table next to my bed or across the room but i dont know how bright the "nighttime" heating element is.

Yeah, if you need extra heat at night, warm the entire room or use the ceramic, no lights at night. If your night temps are 65+ without extra heating, you won't need either.
 
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