Tentative habitat setup. Feedback appreciated

Pickle-cham

Avid Member
I’ve been able to keep my humidifier from getting any mold growth by adding a little hydrogen peroxide to my tank with every fill. H2O2 is actually naturally occurring in rain (and breastmilk-fun fact) but levels are decreasing due to air pollution so in the rainforest it would be even more present. It is also known to help fight respiratory infections. Before I got my chameleon I was using the humidifier with hydrogen peroxide anyways at 1c/5 liters but for her I reduced it to less than 1/2 c and it’s still going well. I’ve had to clean it once in 4 months and it was barely dirty, with being run almost daily. Just a tip if you hate having to clean that frequently. ☺
This is interesting to know, i used hydrogen peroxide to deal with a mealybug infestation on my umbrella tree and known its uses in control in pests on plants i also used to use it on algae control on planted aquarium. Didn't know how safe it is with chameleons though
 

Thatwizard420

Avid Member
Hi. :) Congrats on your pending chameleon! All looks okay to me except feeders. I’ll attach both feeder and gutload sheets for you. Superworms should not be a staple feeder as they are too fatty, not to mention addictive. There’s several other good feeders to use as staples and of course, chams like variety as much as we do. I hear you about roaches but I’d suggest trying them. The roaches we use for feeders aren’t anything like disgusting German roaches or palmetto bugs. I hate them as much as everyone else, but I’ve got nice colonies of discoids and Surinam.
I’m not sure about using avocado as gutload. I seem to recall reading somewhere that it is toxic for some reptiles.
If you haven’t already found your way there, https://chameleonacademy.com/ is a fantastic resource for learning about chameleons. Make sure to check out the podcasts too. Another great resource is Neptune the chameleon on YouTube. Of course, the forum is always helpful and feel free to ask as many questions as needed. Most important of all though...you have to post pics of your cham when you get him/her. 🥰
View attachment 289161View attachment 289162
do only the roaches have to be farmed?
 

ERKleRose

Chameleon Enthusiast
do only the roaches have to be farmed?
Preferably all feeders should be bought from healthy and reputable feeder insect companies. If you live where there’s no pesticides or city pesticid spray overs, you can use wild-caught. Just be careful, as wild-caught and bad feeder companies posse a higher risk for parasites. Whatever you choose, fecal floats are recommended!
 

ERKleRose

Chameleon Enthusiast
Preferably all feeders should be bought from healthy and reputable feeder insect companies. If you live where there’s no pesticides or city pesticid spray overs, you can use wild-caught. Just be careful, as wild-caught and bad feeder companies posse a higher risk for parasites. Whatever you choose, fecal floats are recommended!
Edit: pose, not posse
 
Found a lowes by my work with some plants. Just got one or two 😂
 

Attachments

  • IMG_20210119_164731960.jpg
    IMG_20210119_164731960.jpg
    376.1 KB · Views: 27

Thatwizard420

Avid Member
Found a lowes by my work with some plants. Just got one or two 😂
try to quarantine the plants for a month or so, while they're quarantine, try to water them with just water so all fertilizer can flush out.
Most nurseries use a systemic pesticide. In the case of a pothos which Veileds love to eat, I would propagate them from a stem, then once new growth came out that's when I would put in enclosure.

Maybe I'm just worrying too much, but I work at a nursery and the stuff they use I assume its not good for any animal.
 

Thatwizard420

Avid Member
Preferably all feeders should be bought from healthy and reputable feeder insect companies. If you live where there’s no pesticides or city pesticid spray overs, you can use wild-caught. Just be careful, as wild-caught and bad feeder companies posse a higher risk for parasites. Whatever you choose, fecal floats are recommended!
I know all that, I was just commenting on the Feeder Sheet. Only Roaches say farm, and not any of the other bugs.
 
try to quarantine the plants for a month or so, while they're quarantine, try to water them with just water so all fertilizer can flush out.
Most nurseries use a systemic pesticide. In the case of a pothos which Veileds love to eat, I would propagate them from a stem, then once new growth came out that's when I would put in enclosure.

Maybe I'm just worrying too much, but I work at a nursery and the stuff they use I assume its not good for any animal.
I wouldn't say you are worrying to much. They are probably using mycobutanil and other systemic fungicides unfortunately propagating will not remove these as it's already in the cutting. In general most systemic pesticides should leave the plants systems in like 3 months though.
 

ERKleRose

Chameleon Enthusiast
I use Physan on all of my plants and replace their soil when I get them and try to keep them in quarantine for a few months before using, if I can help it
 

Joeskier

Member
Been having a hell of a time finding plants online or in person. All the lowes and home Depot around have nothing during winter and all the nurseries I'd use near me are either closed for winter or not carrying what I'm looking for.

Anyway I found this site called "PlantVine" and they have EVERYTHING!
a bit more expensive for some stuff especially rarer plants but overall awesome site.

Below is photos what I'm ordering!

Ficus benjamina, pothos, a couple calathea and a couple croton!

They will be medium sized and give me a good dense foliage but my have to supplement some extras while they grow out
Do you have a link ... I have been having the same issues with finding live plants now... also do you mind if I ask where you have ordered your panther from I think I’m might be getting mine from the same place ... mine will be ready approximately March 😊
 

Thatwizard420

Avid Member
I wouldn't say you are worrying to much. They are probably using mycobutanil and other systemic fungicides unfortunately propagating will not remove these as it's already in the cutting. In general most systemic pesticides should leave the plants systems in like 3 months though.
I was under the impression that any new growth will not have the pesticide, only what was already treated.
 

Kyle Harvey

Member
Been having a hell of a time finding plants online or in person. All the lowes and home Depot around have nothing during winter and all the nurseries I'd use near me are either closed for winter or not carrying what I'm looking for.
I feel you on trying to find plants right now. All the Pothos I found around here has some serious frost bite to them. Lowes and Depot left them all out to freeze...
 

Thatwizard420

Avid Member
But if you use a cutting, that is treated if you don’t clean it off, as it’s not new growth
I wait for new growth, I don’t just get a cutting and stick it Vivarium. I get a cutting, root it on spag moss, wait for new significant growth, then I stick in vivarium.
New growth is clean of any pesticide, and only that one original stem has it.
 
I wait for new growth, I don’t just get a cutting and stick it Vivarium. I get a cutting, root it on spag moss, wait for new significant growth, then I stick in vivarium.
New growth is clean of any pesticide, and only that one original stem has it.
That's not the case but depends on what kind of systemic pesticides are used and how nasty they are. For example it's been a big issue in Canadian cannabis where people bought clones from nurseries and failed pesticide testing on buds from all the clones over 3 months later. Mind you this is 3 months of new growth including and entire flower cycle. It can take over 7 back to back rounds of tissue culturing the same material to remove systemic pesticides or pathogens from plant material in many instances.

Mind you I am not a scientist. But I have worked in cannabis and ag industries for years and read many studies on this. The truth is there is between very few ppl and nobody on earth that can give solid answers on a lot of this stuff because the science is largely still being done and changing daily.
 
I wait for new growth, I don’t just get a cutting and stick it Vivarium. I get a cutting, root it on spag moss, wait for new significant growth, then I stick in vivarium.
New growth is clean of any pesticide, and only that one original stem has it.
For the record I am by no means telling you you're not doing the right thing, because you are.

That practice should atleast help to reduce and start to break down pesticides. If pescticides are a major concern propagating from seed is always best option but obviously time intensive and slow.
 

NAUSEATE

Member
That's not the case but depends on what kind of systemic pesticides are used and how nasty they are. For example it's been a big issue in Canadian cannabis where people bought clones from nurseries and failed pesticide testing on buds from all the clones over 3 months later. Mind you this is 3 months of new growth including and entire flower cycle. It can take over 7 back to back rounds of tissue culturing the same material to remove systemic pesticides or pathogens from plant material in many instances.

Mind you I am not a scientist. But I have worked in cannabis and ag industries for years and read many studies on this. The truth is there is between very few ppl and nobody on earth that can give solid answers on a lot of this stuff because the science is largely still being done and changing daily.
It sounds like a pregnant mother. Whatever she puts in her body, transfers over to baby. If that is a drug, baby is affected even after being born. DNA could have been damaged which can then continue to following generations. Might be a stretch but thats how I think of it
 
Top Bottom