Snail success? Or not really.

Rst_Cham

Chameleon Enthusiast
Hi, so, I've basically given up on my snails breeding; they eat and make a huge mess, but no babies so I've just accepted that I have pet snails now. I've put them in a terrarium with plants (that I know they don't like to eat), corkbark, moss, and dead leaves on a coconut coir substrate, a heat mat, a grow light, and I mist and feed them daily and let them live their little lives. I never see any eggs so to be honest, I've been more focused on breeding silks, crickets, grasshoppers, and roaches (you know, things I'm successful at so far.) But this morning I see specks on the glass and plant leaves and they are baby snails. BUT, now they've been exposed to the WC adults so I cant raise them as feeders, right? Sigh.

P.S. baby snails are adorable.
 

Kaizen

Chameleon Enthusiast
Hi, so, I've basically given up on my snails breeding; they eat and make a huge mess, but no babies so I've just accepted that I have pet snails now. I've put them in a terrarium with plants (that I know they don't like to eat), corkbark, moss, and dead leaves on a coconut coir substrate, a heat mat, a grow light, and I mist and feed them daily and let them live their little lives. I never see any eggs so to be honest, I've been more focused on breeding silks, crickets, grasshoppers, and roaches (you know, things I'm successful at so far.) But this morning I see specks on the glass and plant leaves and they are baby snails. BUT, now they've been exposed to the WC adults so I cant raise them as feeders, right? Sigh.

P.S. baby snails are adorable.
I’m actually not sure that that’s true. While I don’t know the life stages of all snail parasites, I think some of the major snail parasites use snails an intermediate host, which, I think means the babies can’t be infected.
 

Hashtag ChamLife

Avid Member
Hi, so, I've basically given up on my snails breeding; they eat and make a huge mess, but no babies so I've just accepted that I have pet snails now. I've put them in a terrarium with plants (that I know they don't like to eat), corkbark, moss, and dead leaves on a coconut coir substrate, a heat mat, a grow light, and I mist and feed them daily and let them live their little lives. I never see any eggs so to be honest, I've been more focused on breeding silks, crickets, grasshoppers, and roaches (you know, things I'm successful at so far.) But this morning I see specks on the glass and plant leaves and they are baby snails. BUT, now they've been exposed to the WC adults so I cant raise them as feeders, right? Sigh.

P.S. baby snails are adorable.
From what I understand, if they're in the same enclosure as the "could have parasites" snails, then no.

The idea is to get the eggs out (the adult snails will burrow down or go under debris that stays moist to lay their eggs). Once you have the eggs, rinse them and place them in a new bin.

That is/was the leading opinion on how to be SURE to not transmit anything.

Personally, I used about 1/2" of soil in a clear box (i used one of those cricket keeper boxes without the tube holes - they'll still sneak out). I was able to spot the eggs either from above or the side or below. My snails left a cluster of eggs about the size of a large pea.
 

Rst_Cham

Chameleon Enthusiast
From what I understand, if they're in the same enclosure as the "could have parasites" snails, then no.

The idea is to get the eggs out (the adult snails will burrow down or go under debris that stays moist to lay their eggs). Once you have the eggs, rinse them and place them in a new bin.

That is/was the leading opinion on how to be SURE to not transmit anything.

Personally, I used about 1/2" of soil in a clear box (i used one of those cricket keeper boxes without the tube holes - they'll still sneak out). I was able to spot the eggs either from above or the side or below. My snails left a cluster of eggs about the size of a large pea.
Yeah, that’s what I’ve read so I guess I won’t risk it. I used to be really good about looking for eggs but never found any so gave up. Thanks for the info.
 

Rst_Cham

Chameleon Enthusiast
I’m actually not sure that that’s true. While I don’t know the life stages of all snail parasites, I think some of the major snail parasites use snails an intermediate host, which, I think means the babies can’t be infected.
Thanks I’m not going risk it but I am going to separate out the babies into their own enclosure and raise them to adults and try again.
 

TheLetterAfterP(Q)

Avid Member
Thanks I’m not going risk it but I am going to separate out the babies into their own enclosure and raise them to adults and try again.
That might take some time!.. my 100+ eggs are barely beginning to get medium sized, and that's not even all of them. Some of them are still teeny tiny snails. Nonetheless, dont give up, you can do it! I'll post some pictures of my egg clutches in just a bit.
 

TheLetterAfterP(Q)

Avid Member
Most of them are still fairly small, however their is a few monsters scattered throughout.
20191017_221024.jpg
20191114_041116.jpg
20191017_221037.jpg
 

snitz427

Chameleon Enthusiast
Yeah, that’s what I’ve read so I guess I won’t risk it. I used to be really good about looking for eggs but never found any so gave up. Thanks for the info.

me too - and then when I least expected it, I got a ton of babies! unfortunately, I also got a huge springtail explosion after the babies that wrecked my colony. I let them seal themselves up for a bit and need to transfer them to a new setup now. Our work is never done!
 

jamest0o0

Chameleon Enthusiast
Snails just need moist substrate, very high humidity, low ventilation and good food(protein helps!, not just greens/veggies). If they're not breeding, check for mites or springtails. They will crawl all over and stress them out. Mist the snails if they go dormant, they'll wake back up. I've had thousands over the years, messed up a lot and learned a lot along the way. They also like warmth around 80-90 degrees I forgot to mention.

Honestly, the parasite thing might be overblown. I heard somewhere that lungworm will even die out after some time of not finding a new host. I'd have to look more into this, but idk anyone that had a cham get lungworm. I get the need for caution, as I am cautious too, but just throwing it out there.
 

TheLetterAfterP(Q)

Avid Member
VideoCapture_20190807-001249.jpg
20190807_121848.jpg


Question: Do gnats/fruit files count as parasites aswell? Every now and then I see a few flying in the snail enclosure, I'm going to clean it today so it doesn't get out of hand, just wondering.
 

TheLetterAfterP(Q)

Avid Member
Snails just need moist substrate, very high humidity, low ventilation and good food(protein helps!, not just greens/veggies). If they're not breeding, check for mites or springtails. They will crawl all over and stress them out. Mist the snails if they go dormant, they'll wake back up. I've had thousands over the years, messed up a lot and learned a lot along the way. They also like warmth around 80-90 degrees I forgot to mention.

Honestly, the parasite thing might be overblown. I heard somewhere that lungworm will even die out after some time of not finding a new host. I'd have to look more into this, but idk anyone that had a cham get lungworm. I get the need for caution, as I am cautious too, but just throwing it out there.
I'd like to point out that IME, my snails are loving and appreciating the open screen top very much. It does dry them out a bit quicker, but nothing a quick mist can't handle.
 

snitz427

Chameleon Enthusiast
someone mentioned live plants that they snails did not eat - do you mind sharing what plants you're using? I'd like to add a live plant but they've totally destroyed a head of lettuce in 2 days, can't imagine what they'll do to some poor unsuspecting plant.
 

jamest0o0

Chameleon Enthusiast
I'd like to point out that IME, my snails are loving and appreciating the open screen top very much. It does dry them out a bit quicker, but nothing a quick mist can't handle.

I've done both, I liked the lower ventilation better. Plus I don't have time to be spraying down a cage everyday. I've had snails for 3 years now and this is what's worked best for me. If the screen is working for you, be my guest.
 

jamest0o0

Chameleon Enthusiast
View attachment 253297View attachment 253298

Question: Do gnats/fruit files count as parasites aswell? Every now and then I see a few flying in the snail enclosure, I'm going to clean it today so it doesn't get out of hand, just wondering.

Nope, not unless they are the more rare phorid flies that lay eggs in living things. Haven't heard of anyone encountering them though. Not in this hobby at least.
 

Rst_Cham

Chameleon Enthusiast
someone mentioned live plants that they snails did not eat - do you mind sharing what plants you're using? I'd like to add a live plant but they've totally destroyed a head of lettuce in 2 days, can't imagine what they'll do to some poor unsuspecting plant.
I have croton and Arrowhead vine in with them and while they thoroughly enjoying cruising all over them, they haven't taken so much as a bite out of either.
 

Rst_Cham

Chameleon Enthusiast
Snails just need moist substrate, very high humidity, low ventilation and good food(protein helps!, not just greens/veggies). If they're not breeding, check for mites or springtails. They will crawl all over and stress them out. Mist the snails if they go dormant, they'll wake back up. I've had thousands over the years, messed up a lot and learned a lot along the way. They also like warmth around 80-90 degrees I forgot to mention.

Honestly, the parasite thing might be overblown. I heard somewhere that lungworm will even die out after some time of not finding a new host. I'd have to look more into this, but idk anyone that had a cham get lungworm. I get the need for caution, as I am cautious too, but just throwing it out there.
James, thanks for the info, what kind of protein are you feeding them?
I tried putting bug burger in with them and they ignored it.
 
Top Bottom