Shedding PLEASE HELP

jewel0301

Member
So this UVB is incorrect. You need a T5HO fixture and a 5.0 bulb that runs the width of your enclosure. I would get a 24 inch fixture since you will need to have that on the adult cage. Then the basking branch should be 8-9 inches below with the fixture sitting directly on the cage.

Make sure you get the reptivite with D3 version.

With your feeding... Cut back on the wax worms... Really those are meant more for treats. Not a staple feeder due to the high fat content.

I would feed in the morning so he has all day to bask. But if you want to add additional crickets do it like at noon. Otherwise it is more then ok to add all feeders to the feeder cup or run in the morning and he will eat as he wants.

Yeah nope so at the branch with a temp guage that has a probe you want it to be 80 Degrees. No hotter then 82. This is for their entire life. We do not increase temps just because they become adults. High heat shortens lifespans.
Thank you SO MUCH!!!!!! I’ll probably have more questions the more he grows and older he gets lol!
 

ERKleRose

Chameleon Enthusiast
What do you gutload with? For the T5 HO linear UVB bulb, make sure it is only either a Zoo Med 5.0 (replace every 6 months) or an Arcadia 6% (replace yearly), no other brands or strengths. Definitely get a Solarmeter 6.5 if you afford it, too! Also, I see fake plants, and veileds can’t have them because of the impaction risk. He needs chameleon-safe and veiled-tested live plants only. Could a post a pic of the full cage (lights to bottom), please? @Beman has linked great resources! Make sure to read through every module and the veiled species profile, as well as listen to as many podcasts as possible, from The Chameleon Academy, as they have the most accurate and up-to-date info!
 

cruz.m

Avid Member
Thank you SO MUCH!!!!!! I’ll probably have more questions the more he grows and older he gets lol!
You’ve gotten tons of help and advice but I have a little input. So hornworms are not recommended until 4 months of age usually... if they are small enough larvae then you could feed them as treats I suppose but since they are so small they don’t have as much juiciness and all that in them, as if they were to be more later into the larvae stage. Also, make sure the hornworm isn’t too big for him...I’ll recommend until he’s a little bigger (4 months+) to stop feeding them trust me the time will fly by, remember feeders should be no bigger than the width between their eyes (hornworms are a little exception as they are squishy/softer bodied etc. but still have to be sized appropriately so at 4 months he should still get a small larvae not super tiny though) Waxworms are also treats as they are very fatty, crickets are fine as long as they are gutloaded/dusted if not they really have no nutricional value as their phosphorus to calcium ratio isn’t good. Gutloading your feeders is also very important! Neptune the Chameleon on YouTube has some great videos so you should definitely check her out!
https://m.youtube.com/channel/UC3n4S2GRkOGfk2U8-xhaw6Q
 
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Beman

Chameleon Enthusiast
You’ve gotten tons of help and advice but I have a little input. So hornworms are not recommended until 4 months of age usually... if they are small enough larvae then you could feed them as treats I suppose but since they are so small they don’t have as much juiciness and all that in them, as if they were to be more later into the larvae stage. Also, make sure the hornworm isn’t too big for him...I’ll recommend until he’s a little bigger (4 months+) to stop feeding them trust me the time will fly by, remember feeders should be no bigger than the width between their eyes (hornworms are a little exception as they are squishy/softer bodied etc. but still have to be sized appropriately so at 4 months he should still get a small larvae not super tiny though) Waxworms are also treats as they are very fatty, crickets are fine as long as they are gutloaded/dusted if not they really have no nutricional value as their phosphorus to calcium ratio isn’t good. Gutloading your feeders is also very important! Neptune the Chameleon on YouTube has some great videos so you should definitely check her out!
https://m.youtube.com/channel/UC3n4S2GRkOGfk2U8-xhaw6Q
Just want to correct one thing here. Horns can be fed to babies as well as long as they are size appropriate. They start off quite small when you order them in especially in winter months because the do not have the same growth rate as summer warm temps in shipping.
Small silks can be fed to babies as well. You would be looking at using the 1 inch length for a 3-4 month old cham. And of course hand feeding only so there is not a risk of tongue damage since horns are able to secure themselves to things. 1/4 inch size feeders for crickets and Dubia.

Crickets actually are a healthy feeder even if your doing a crap gutload.... Almost all the feeders we feed have a bad phos to cal ratio this is why we dust them with the correct supplementation. To balance this ratio out.


Feeder nutrition chart.jpeg
 

jewel0301

Member
What do you gutload with? For the T5 HO linear UVB bulb, make sure it is only either a Zoo Med 5.0 (replace every 6 months) or an Arcadia 6% (replace yearly), no other brands or strengths. Definitely get a Solarmeter 6.5 if you afford it, too! Also, I see fake plants, and veileds can’t have them because of the impaction risk. He needs chameleon-safe and veiled-tested live plants only. Could a post a pic of the full cage (lights to bottom), please? @Beman has linked great resources! Make sure to read through every module and the veiled species profile, as well as listen to as many podcasts as possible, from The Chameleon Academy, as they have the most accurate and up-to-date info!
gut loading with kale!
 

ERKleRose

Chameleon Enthusiast
I attached something for gutloading!! You need to gutload with more than just kale.
@jewel0301 make sure to only use the chart with the white background, it is the updated version and the one you should use! Your gutload needs more ingredients, so also make sure there’s tons of varied safe and fresh ingredients (in the correct ratios), as variety is key for gutload ingredients, and feeders, too!
 
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