Screen Climbing, attitude change, no appetite

Aubreyw

New Member
My about 7 month old Veiled Chameleon has recently not been eating the crickets I offer. I offered a horn worm and she accepted that, but didn't eat anything else this past week. I also noticed she was almost constantly screen climbing and even climbing on the roof of the enclosure. She also has been way more temperamental and meaner than usual. I rearranged and added husbandry and more climbing sticks because I thought maybe she just didn't have enough to climb on or was bored. That hasn't seemed to help much. The only recent change has been. the basking light. I used a 100 W bulb for a couple days because the 75W bulb broke. I decided to go for the 60 W bulb because I live in Arizona and the temps have been increasing. Could this have something to do with it?
 

MissSkittles

Chameleon Enthusiast
What have your basking temps been?
Her restlessness sounds like she may be in her receptive period. Has she recently developed her pretty colors and patterns?
 

Aubreyw

New Member
The basking temps range from 85-90 throughout the day.
Can you describe a little more what a receptive period is? I have seen conflicting answers.
She has recently developed more colors such as yellowish spots and more teal colors
 

MissSkittles

Chameleon Enthusiast
The basking temps range from 85-90 throughout the day.
Can you describe a little more what a receptive period is? I have seen conflicting answers.
She has recently developed more colors such as yellowish spots and more teal colors
The receptive period is when they’ve become sexually mature and ready for mating. I think of it as they get all prettied up and go searching for a man.
You’ll want to lower her temps so they don’t get any higher than 80.
 

MissSkittles

Chameleon Enthusiast
Does your girl have a lay bin? If not, now is the time to get it made and put it in her enclosure. It’s best to use a plastic bin that is at least 12” wide and long. Fill it to about 5-6” with washed play sand that is moistened throughout enough to hold a tunnel without collapsing. Usually it’s best to drill some tiny holes in the bottom of the bin to drain any excess water that may get in. She may lay her eggs as soon as within a few weeks of her receptive period ending. Once she enters her lay bin and starts digging, you’ll need to give her absolute privacy. It’s best to cover just the lower half of her enclosure with a light sheet. You can make some small peek holes to check on her, but do not let her see anyone or she may stop digging and could become eggbound. She may dig a few tunnels until she’s happy with one. She may sleep in a tunnel. Keep your normal light schedule. When her tunnel is done to her satisfaction, she’ll put her butt down and lay her eggs. She’ll very carefully cover all of her tunnels and return to her basking branch when all done. Feed and hydrate her well for a couple of days. Hornworms and silkworms are great feeders at this time. Then you’ll want to count the eggs and dispose of them as they aren’t fertile. After a couple of days of feeding her well, you’ll start her on a reduced feeding schedule of 3-4 feeders, 3 days a week (plus occasional treats) and keep her basking temp at no higher than 80. This will help reduce her egg production and laying, which will prolong her life.
 
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