Screen cage or glass cage?

johncjb

New Member
Hi, I've been thinking to get a chameleon (a humid species such as jacksons or quadricornis) and would like to know if a screen or glass terrarium would be better.

How does a screen terrarium keep the fog and humidity in? wouldn't the fog just escape through the walls?

However, would a glass terrarium get soaked from lack of ventilation?

I would like to know which is better for a foggy and cool chameleon.

btw: i've been unable to find any four horned chameleons (quadricornis) for sale anywhere. If anyone knows of a website that sells these I would much appreciate it if you could send me a link.

Thanks,
 

sandrachameleon

Chameleon Enthusiast
If your home or outdoor (wherever you're going to keep the cage) environment is close to what the chameleon needs, screen works well.

If however your local environment has too low of a humidity, you'll want a more solid sided enclosure so that you can better retain the humidity. Glass is one option.

If you have a solid or semi-solid sided cage, you do want to ensure it has a few vents, preferably placed in the lower third of the cage. With even a small heat lamp placed ontop will cause the warmed air to rise, drawing cooler fresh air in through the vents.
 
http://www.flchams.com/other-chameleons-for-sale.asp?id=102605

they are currently out of stock but i would get ahold of them and ask them the ETA on the next babies

you can also look on fauna classifieds or post in the for sale section here that you want one

as for the enclosure. do not buy glass unless you want a sure way to give your guy health issues. buy a reptarium cage thats nylon mesh, the mesh is much much finer than the aluminum enclosures, also buy a large one so you are able to fit a very large plant in that can hold a lot of moisture and water droplets, also purchase zillas tropical mist ( link below) the aloe vera in it will help with humidity and allow the water to bead up nicely on the plants.




http://www.petco.com/product/108568..._4-_-Zilla Tropical Mist Reptile Spray-108568
 

sandrachameleon

Chameleon Enthusiast
I don't think it's a very good suggestion for a first time chameleon owner. They do not know all the quirks to keeping this
 
When I first started keeping chameleons I started with the Exo Terra Naturalistic enclosures and I have had no problems, and have been using them ever since. Ventilation strips provide good circulation because the heat from the lights above push air down, while the vent strips push air upwards, thus creating a nice air cycle.
 

VigilantSpearIII

New Member
Just get an Exo-Terra terrarium. Those are good noob starter enclosures. Easy to maintain moisture, water-proof, pretty sturdy, decent ventilation, plus they look good. I would especially recommend one for a Jackson.

Just wanted to add that glass is not a health risk like some make it out to be. Its a strongly propagated myth that glass=cham-death here in the states for some reason. The only issue with glass is if you keep it too hot aka the greenhouse effect. The other issue is that some chams get upset if they happen to see their own reflection, which is a pretty rare occurrence. Mesh on the other hand is good, but hard to keep humidified to the levels that a Jackson need.

Exo-Terra, Get-chu-one!
 

sandrachameleon

Chameleon Enthusiast
I don't think it's a very good suggestion for a first time chameleon owner. They do not know all the quirks to keeping this

there are "quirks" to any kind of cage. you have to keep the right environment inside the cage no matter what its construction type.

even Screen cages can be dangerous if not done right. Screen blocks some of the UVB (especially dense/fine mesh that is popular in some cages), doesn't retain heat or humidity worth beans, can cause toenails to be ripped out if the interior decoration is such that the cham climbs the screen, ...

I personally like the way Europeans do enclosures with wood. My own cages are largely wood.

that said, if its hard to find a solid or semi-solid walled enclosure (glass or otherwise) the OP could potentially get a screen cages and cover the back and both sides and part of the front with plastic. that would help with retaining humidity. Jacks need 70-80% humidity, which is hard to do with a typical screen cage unless one lives in a naturally humid place.

there are many options for an open minded person who does a little research
 
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