Reptile/Amphibian of the Week

12 YEAR OLD HERPOTOLIGIST

Established Member
Hello everyone. I am so sorry I missed last week's Reptile/Amphibian of the Week. I had a lot going on and I forgot, so this week's Reptile/Amphibian of the week will be for this week and last week.



This week's and last week's Amphibian of the Week is...


red-eyed-tree-frog-on-leaves-3-2.ngsversion.1599857829864.adapt.1900.1.jpg


The Red-Eyed Tree Frog will grow to be 2 cm in length for males and around 3-4 cm in length for females. It is widely known for its bulging red eyes; blue, yellow, and green mixed body color; and its orange toes. When the Tree Frog sleeps, it hides its distinct colors, but the frog displays its colors if it is being chased to confuse or disinterest the predator. Similar to other Tree Frogs, the Red-Eyed Tree Frog has suction cups for climbing along its toes that allows it to climb trees and leaves.
 

Klyde O'Scope

Chameleon Enthusiast
The Red-Eyed Tree Frog will grow to be 2 cm in length for males and around 3-4 cm in length for females. It is widely known for its bulging red eyes; blue, yellow, and green mixed body color; and its orange toes. When the Tree Frog sleeps, it hides its distinct colors, but the frog displays its colors if it is being chased to confuse or disinterest the predator. Similar to other Tree Frogs, the Red-Eyed Tree Frog has suction cups for climbing along its toes that allows it to climb trees and leaves.

From: https://www.lamar.edu/arts-sciences...jungle-critters-2/the-red-eyed-tree-frog.html
The Red-Eyed Tree Frog will grow to be 2 cm in length for males and around 3-4 cm in length for females. It is widely known for its bulging red eyes; blue, yellow, and green mixed body color; and its orange toes. When the Tree Frog sleeps, it hides its distinct colors, but the frog displays its colors if it is being chased to confuse or disinterest the predator. Similar to other Tree Frogs, the Red-Eyed Tree Frog has suction cups for climbing along its toes that allows it to climb trees and leaves.

Looks like somebody's been plagiarizing again. Just another friendly reminder... ;)
If you're going to copy/paste from another source, it's customary to quote and credit them and provide a link to your source, as I've done above (there are other ways as well).

Here are a number of articles on more formal citations you may need later in high school, college, or beyond. how to cite wikipedia as a source

Let me put it another way... Suppose I signed up on a different forum, and began copy/pasting information from this forum—including posts, blogs, care sheets, and other items from the resources section without citation or credit of any kind—essentially claiming it as my own original work. Would that be right? Suppose it was your original work that you had spent weeks to months (years in the case of a blog?) on, it got passed around the web—site to site—and you never got credit or recognition for your efforts? Would that be alright with you?

There's nothing wrong with using information from another source as long as you give credit to that source.

I speak as an author, instructor, and publisher.
 
Last edited:

kinyonga

Chameleon Enthusiast
Red eyed tree frogs are one of my favourite frogs!
I had one once but it didn't live long. It came in sick and I didn't know enough about it to save it back then.
Good choice for this week's critter of the week!
 
Top Bottom