Receptive again

MissSkittles

Chameleon Enthusiast
Hey there folks. So it seems Miss Grumpy is once again all dressed up and with nowhere to go. She’s got her pretty colors on and has been restlessly climbing all over and up and down her enclosure same as she did in early July when she was receptive. She’s only gone thru the one cycle and it wasn’t all that long ago. She’s been getting 3-4 med/lg sized silkies or 2 silkies and 5-6 sm/med bsfl every other day. Occasionally eats a blueberry or 2. Basking temp is 85-90 with gradients thru enclosure to around 78 during the day and low to mid 70’s at night. I’ve been trying to find a (temperature) compromise between what the cham vet said and forum ideals, as the two aren’t the same.
Questions:
How frequently do they cycle?
Am I feeding too much?
Are my temps too high?
Does being receptive automatically mean she’ll be laying eggs? Can she have a receptive cycle and not need to lay?
Many thanks!
BFC27071-AACA-4946-85E5-5983E5DAEE0C.jpeg
 

MissSkittles

Chameleon Enthusiast
That’s way to hot for a female. Heat also plays a role in egg development also try feeding every 3 days. You want to give her enough to survive but not enough to make to many eggs
I’ve been greatly conflicted on which temp is best for my girl - vet’s advice or forum’s. I had her basking area at around 80 and vet said to make hotter, can get up to 100 and above. Compromising in the middle made the most sense. I am aware of the toll laying places on their bodies and shortens their lifespans, so will lower her temps again. Will also try reducing her feedings. I just didn’t expect her to cycle again so very soon. Thanks Joxie!
 

JoXie411

Chameleon Enthusiast
I’ve been greatly conflicted on which temp is best for my girl - vet’s advice or forum’s. I had her basking area at around 80 and vet said to make hotter, can get up to 100 and above. Compromising in the middle made the most sense. I am aware of the toll laying places on their bodies and shortens their lifespans, so will lower her temps again. Will also try reducing her feedings. I just didn’t expect her to cycle again so very soon. Thanks Joxie!
I get your vet is trying to give you good advice but when it comes to females you want to keep them lower for egg development purposes. It takes a lot out of the female to make eggs and it also shortens their lives every clutch that they have so keeping the numbers down is your best bet
 
Last edited:

kinyonga

Chameleon Enthusiast
IMHO that's too long. I usually only give her a couple of feedings and then cut them back. I have no scientific proof but I think leaving them longer than that sets the number of follicles higher. Just my own belief.
 

MissSkittles

Chameleon Enthusiast
IMHO that's too long. I usually only give her a couple of feedings and then cut them back. I have no scientific proof but I think leaving them longer than that sets the number of follicles higher. Just my own belief.
Well, obviously your own belief has been working quite well at reducing your girl’s egg production and thereby extending their lives a bit. I’ll take any and all advice you want to share. :)
What are the best temp ranges and going by med/lg silkies, how much and how often should I be feeding?
 

kinyonga

Chameleon Enthusiast
Thanks for your faith in me!
I feed them 5 to 8 large crickets every two or three days...or the same amount/volume of other insects. I keep the temperature in the mid to low 80's as much as possible when I'm trying to keep them from producing...but that is mostly to slow their metabolism so they won't feel so hungry.

Even a veiled that I got from a study that was producing clutches regularly I was able to stop from producing eggs after a few months. She lived to be over 7.

I don't think we have to stop them completely...just lowering the clutch size is a good thing IMHO.
 

MissSkittles

Chameleon Enthusiast
Thanks for your faith in me!
I feed them 5 to 8 large crickets every two or three days...or the same amount/volume of other insects. I keep the temperature in the mid to low 80's as much as possible when I'm trying to keep them from producing...but that is mostly to slow their metabolism so they won't feel so hungry.

Even a veiled that I got from a study that was producing clutches regularly I was able to stop from producing eggs after a few months. She lived to be over 7.

I don't think we have to stop them completely...just lowering the clutch size is a good thing IMHO.
Thanks Kinyonga! Much appreciate your advice! :)
 

kinyonga

Chameleon Enthusiast
@MissSkittles you're welcome.

@Bigsky It can with some species...don't know if it works for all of them or not. I've stopped female veileds from producing at all and decreased the clutch size with female panthers. It has to be done right though and it isn't always easy.
 
Top Bottom