Quick Deploy Outdoor Community Free Range

Provancha65

New Member
From left to right" Decimus Ambilobe, Tony Clifton/Ambilobe, Blue Raja/Nosy Be, Atraxia Sambava(Unammed still:( ), Mr. Rogers/Ambilobe, and Gemini/Ambanja. Orion/Ambilobe and George/Nost Be are not allowed on the free range, as they would cause conflict, we even have a picture of the two after they were placed on the free range together and it turned into fire vs ice. Needless to say, they are no longer allowed within proximity of one another. Also, note the little Sambava patrolling around the base of the structure, he is hunting for honey bees, and has become a professional at sniping them and any other unfortunate winged insects that come into his range. We cleared out the clover and other small flowers from the immediate vicinity, as the global bee population is already in peril, but he adapts rapidly but expanding the distance he is willing to travel.

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Mike Fisher

Established Member
That's pretty cool. It'd be neat to incorporate that idea into an EZ-up so they could get shade if needed. What are you doing for a perimeter, or are you just monitoring full time?

I have a bunch of falcons in my neighborhood because I live close to an airport. They bring a bunch of them in to control the risk of bird strikes by aircraft. I'd be scared to have them out in the open like that around here. The other day a falcon swooped down right in front of me to grab a medium sized squirrel out of my yard. It scooped it up and flew away with very little effort.:eek:

Nice forest background BTW. :) Your chams are amazing.
 

Lala0

Member
How do you manage to keep that many male chams that close together? my two would just go for each other!

Nice area for them to climb on tho!
 

Provancha65

New Member
Mike, we absolutely are watching them for the entire duration they spend on the free range, we also mist and hand feed them during their outing. As we live in the same area, and I used to, and still do, rescue predatory avian species, I am absolutely aware of the dangers of a lurking red-tailed yearling, or a sharp shin or cooper's, which is also why we monitor them while they are on this range. Lala0, we only allow the more temperate males to range together, if they display any re-occurring aggression or show visible signs of excessive stress, we remove them from the range. We have 3 males that we specifically do not allow to range together at all. Also, keep in mind, this is something that we do roughly 2-3 times a month tops.
 

Mike Fisher

Established Member
Also, keep in mind, this is something that we do roughly 2-3 times a month tops.

Probably plenty of time to get more UVB than can be provided by bulbs. They sure are pretty out in the sunlight. Love the contrasts you've got going on with all of the different locales. Thanks for sharing.
 
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