Piebald chameleon

Countrygirl01

New Member
I recently rescued a baby (~5g) piebald chameleon and I’m looking for some general information and experience with this particular morph. I really can’t find any information on the internet and want to provide the best care. Anything special that the piebalds need or y’all would recommend since we’re currently building her more permanent enclosure. She seems to be doing really well. Originally had a lot of retained shed in the eyes causing her to not eat on her own and keep her eyes closed. I’ve rehabilitated and assist fed for the last few weeks and her eyes are fully open now. She willingly eats when I assist, but not really eating well on her own when I leave crickets (in a bowl) in her enclosure. Any suggestions on how to encourage her to eat on her own/hunt?
 

Attachments

  • EEFE60A3-957A-4868-9E53-A49D24B45E12.jpeg
    EEFE60A3-957A-4868-9E53-A49D24B45E12.jpeg
    189.2 KB · Views: 25

ERKleRose

Chameleon Enthusiast
Welcome on here! Piebald veileds have the same care as normal ones, they're just colored differently. This site goes through everything, so make sure to read through all of the modules and the veiled care sheet: https://chameleonacademy.com/

If you want, you can fill out a husbandry form to make sure everything is in tip-top shape! You can try a feeder run or let the feeders loose in her cage to see if that helps. What are you using for a bowl?
 

Countrygirl01

New Member
Welcome on here! Piebald veileds have the same care as normal ones, they're just colored differently. This site goes through everything, so make sure to read through all of the modules and the veiled care sheet: https://chameleonacademy.com/

If you want, you can fill out a husbandry form to make sure everything is in tip-top shape! You can try a feeder run or let the feeders loose in her cage to see if that helps. What are you using for a bowl?
Thank you for the info and link! I’ll definitely read through that. I’m currently feeding small crickets in a small cloudy/clear container that meal worms come in and I’ve removed one of their back legs so they can’t jump out, but still move around a lot.
 

Beman

Social Media Manager
Staff member
I would do a husbandry review. I agree with Kinyonga... UVB is almost always associated with eating issues.

If you want to just copy and paste the form below in your reply and fill it out with a ton of detail. Add pics of the entire cage and of the lighting on top.

Chameleon Info:
  • Your Chameleon - The species, sex, and age of your chameleon. How long has it been in your care?
  • Handling - How often do you handle your chameleon?
  • Feeding - What are you feeding your cham? What amount? What is the schedule? How are you gut-loading your feeders?
  • Supplements - What brand and type of calcium and vitamin products are you dusting your feeders with and what is the schedule?
  • Watering - What kind of watering technique do you use? How often and how long to you mist? Do you see your chameleon drinking?
  • Fecal Description - Briefly note colors and consistency from recent droppings. Has this chameleon ever been tested for parasites?
  • History - Any previous information about your cham that might be useful to others when trying to help you.

Cage Info:
  • Cage Type - Describe your cage (Glass, Screen, Combo?) What are the dimensions?
  • Lighting - What brand, model, and types of lighting are you using? What is your daily lighting schedule?
  • Temperature - What temp range have you created (cage floor to basking spot)? Lowest overnight temp? How do you measure these temps?
  • Humidity - What are your humidity levels? How are you creating and maintaining these levels? What do you use to measure humidity?
  • Plants - Are you using live plants? If so, what kind?
  • Placement - Where is your cage located? Is it near any fans, air vents, or high traffic areas? At what height is the top of the cage relative to your room floor?
  • Location - Where are you geographically located?

Current Problem - The current problem you are concerned about.
--------------
Please Note:
  1. The more details you provide the better and more accurate help you will receive.
  2. Photos can be very helpful.
 

kinyonga

Chameleon Queen
Regarding the comment about UVB...I was thinking more about this..."Albino and hypomelanistic morphs of any species are likely to be more sensitive to UV and visible light, and will need much-reduced exposure levels. Skin pigments, especially melanin, block UV radiation. A lack of skin and eye pigmentation therefore allows a higher percentage of UV to penetrate the cells, increasing the risks of UV skin damage (“sunburn”) and even cancer. Fortunately, this increased UV transmission means that adequate vitamin D3 synthesis should still be possible despite lower UV exposure."

https://reptilesmagazine.com/an-in-depth-look-at-uv-light-and-its-proper-use-with-reptiles/
 

Beman

Social Media Manager
Staff member
Regarding the comment about UVB...I was thinking more about this..."Albino and hypomelanistic morphs of any species are likely to be more sensitive to UV and visible light, and will need much-reduced exposure levels. Skin pigments, especially melanin, block UV radiation. A lack of skin and eye pigmentation therefore allows a higher percentage of UV to penetrate the cells, increasing the risks of UV skin damage (“sunburn”) and even cancer. Fortunately, this increased UV transmission means that adequate vitamin D3 synthesis should still be possible despite lower UV exposure."

https://reptilesmagazine.com/an-in-depth-look-at-uv-light-and-its-proper-use-with-reptiles/
So I actually looked into this because I had one... From the Chameleon Academy. https://chameleonacademy.com/veiled-chameleon-care/

"The Translucent or Pied morph of veiled chameleon is a color variety that has been encouraged in captivity. It is characterized by patches of white, pink, and black colors. Although there have been concerns of its ability to survive normal UVB, breeders of this morph report that there appears to be no difference in behavior or health between normal and translucent animals."

I had mine under a 3 UVI and he was growing perfectly with no issues.
 

kinyonga

Chameleon Queen
You might find this interesting...about "regular" veileds...
"Saudi Arabia, and are found in a wide range of habitats including dry plateaus, mountains, and river valleys. They are diurnal, usually found in bushes and shrubs in the daytime, retreating into shade during the middle of the day. Skin samples allowed moderate amounts of UVB through. These chameleons live in an environment with high levels of UVB in the sunlight, but because they are predominently shade dwellers their UVB requirements in captivity may be considered similar to those of Parson's and Globifer chameleons."

"Unlike the bearded dragons tested, chameleon skin gives more uniform results, regardless of where on the body the samples come from. This is probably because, being an arboreal and lateral basker, the chameleon’s whole body would be exposed to UVB."

http://www.uvguide.co.uk/skintests.htm

This was interesting but not about veileds...
"Panther chameleon - gravid female side 34%"
"Panther chameleon - old female side 19%"
 
Top Bottom