Panther aim/shooting issue

Rusty84

New Member
My panther cannot shoot his tongue straight and catch his food. He seems eager to eat when I put the food in and he goes rushing over to get it but his tongue comes out sideways and upwards.
I have attached an image to show his how far he misses by.

Can anyone suggest what may be causing this?

He’s in a reptibreeze with a basking bulb, 5.0 UVB T5, an LED grow light for the live plants, dripper and mist system.
I’ve tried feeding him locusts, crickets, dubias dusted with non D3 calcium but I’m concerned he’s not eating enough.

Any help would be most appreciated.

PS I know feeding from tongs is not ideal but I’m basically having to wait till he shoots then give him the food. I’ve never seen him catch his own meal.
 

Attachments

  • 4D38C848-9CF6-4D95-9900-464EB0B2FCE5.png
    4D38C848-9CF6-4D95-9900-464EB0B2FCE5.png
    817.5 KB · Views: 40
  • 045486C7-B4EF-4771-B41F-269867DB655B.png
    045486C7-B4EF-4771-B41F-269867DB655B.png
    729.2 KB · Views: 39

Rusty84

New Member
What is the multivitamin and frequency used?
Not currently adding a multivitamin. It wasn’t mentioned when I got him but I’ve since learned that it is a requirement but was under the impression it could be achieved through the gutload of the feeders?
I should add this has been the case since I got him so was clearly a problem before but am obviously not able to confirm what was offered prior to him arriving with me.
If I should add a multivitamin can you suggest one so I can order asap?
 

Lindasjackson

Chameleon Enthusiast
Hi, and welcome to the forum. We are glad you’re here! The tongs may be how he hurt his tongue. Tongs should never be used with chams, it’s just too dangerous. Can you just hold the feeder in your fingers and put it in his mouth when he opens it to try to shoot his tongue? Does he have any dark spots or sores on his tongue or in his mouth? Are you giving him any D3 at all? It sounds like he needs to be seen by a vet that has Cham experience.
 

Rusty84

New Member
Hi, and welcome to the forum. We are glad you’re here! The tongs may be how he hurt his tongue. Tongs should never be used with chams, it’s just too dangerous. Can you just hold the feeder in your fingers and put it in his mouth when he opens it to try to shoot his tongue? Does he have any dark spots or sores on his tongue or in his mouth? Are you giving him any D3 at all? It sounds like he needs to be seen by a vet that has Cham experience.
Thank you for the welcome and reply.
He has been like this since I got him so hasn’t hurt himself on the tongs with me but could have been the cause before.
I use a D3 calcium one per month.
Not sure of using my fingers as he’s a grumpy wee so and so and tried to bite should I get too close.
I have an exotic vet not too far away so may have to take him there to be seen.
 

bbyoda

Chameleon Enthusiast
Here's the supplement schedule:

- phosphorus free calcium without D3 every feeding, except:
- calcium with D3 once a month
- multivitamin once a month

I use Reptivite with D3 like @Lindasjackson which is both the multivitamin and D3 so I do that every two weeks (so twice a month). You can get a separate multivitamin without D3 and use it with the other supplements you have now.

How old is his UVB bulb? Can you share pics of the entire enclosure top to bottom?

We have a full help / husbandry form if you want a full review you copy and paste and add your answers. The questions are in the "how to ask for help" thread in the health forum. Just easier to provide advice when we have the holistic picture of the husbandry.
 

DocZ

Chameleon Enthusiast
Looking at the pictures, it looks like his tongue is fully extending. Does that seem right to you?
What’s your gutloading like, what insects are feeding? There’s some potential that there’s a nutritional deficiency of some kind. I would make sure you’re using nutritious and varied foods for your feeders, and giving as much variety of bugs as possible.

It’s always important to make sure husbandry parameters are dialed in as well any time there’s a health issue. Temp and humidity gradients, and proper day/night humidity cycles are essential to their health
 

Klyde O'Scope

Chameleon Enthusiast
Not sure of using my fingers as he’s a grumpy wee so and so and tried to bite should I get too close.
Depending on the feeder, you might try open hand/palm. This can be challenging with some feeders like crickets, but not entirely impossible.

A feeder bowl/dish may also help; he can shoot down into it. Some of us use these or similar:
1638793707920.png

Petco has them on sale, but they're pretty inexpensive anyway. I think mine was $3.

I have an exotic vet not too far away so may have to take him there to be seen.
(y)
 

DonKeesh

Avid Member
Not currently adding a multivitamin. It wasn’t mentioned when I got him but I’ve since learned that it is a requirement but was under the impression it could be achieved through the gutload of the feeders?
I should add this has been the case since I got him so was clearly a problem before but am obviously not able to confirm what was offered prior to him arriving with me.
If I should add a multivitamin can you suggest one so I can order asap?
I would add some repashy calcium plus to his regiment. My guess is vitamin deficiencies.
 

Klyde O'Scope

Chameleon Enthusiast
Not currently adding a multivitamin. It wasn’t mentioned when I got him but I’ve since learned that it is a requirement but was under the impression it could be achieved through the gutload of the feeders?
TBH, the main reason for supplements at all is insurance against... let's call it 'imperfect husbandry'. None of us are perfect. Try as we might, this can include imperfect gutloading.

We humans may need supplements because of poor diet, genetic or other inability to process/assimilate certain nutrients, lack of sunshine (D3), lifestyle, stress, and probably a litany of other reasons... We're all different, so individuals may/will have different needs based on what they're lacking.

Chameleons are also individuals, and may have different needs for some of the same reasons. Since periodic testing of what a particular chameleon may be lacking would be prohibitively expensive, we supplement with some basic things we know they need, but may be lacking. We also have to be careful of over-supplementing with some vitamins (like A & D3).
 
Last edited:

kinyonga

Chameleon Queen
I'm the picture with you using the tongs....were you holding the tongs in that exact position shown when he shot the tongue out and the tongue ended up shooting onto the screen as it shows in the photo?

We're his eyes both focused on the cricket when he shot the tongue out?
 
Top Bottom